On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

frankieleon/Flickr via Creative Commons

Every day doctors write more than 650,000 opioid prescriptions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In some of those cases, addiction follows. As a result, deaths from prescription opioids have more than quadrupled since 1999. Travis Rieder is a bioethicist at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, and he personally experienced a dependence on opioids. He wrote about it in the January issue of the journal “Health Affairs,” and a portion of that article was excerpted in the Washington Post. Original air date: January 24, 2017.

Imagine being a teenager faced with a devastating choice - either be drafted into the army of the country trying to gain control of your home or flee. For Dawit Gebremichael Habte, the only choice was to escape. Eventually, he resettled in the Maryland and focused his efforts on his education - attending Johns Hopkins University - with the goal of returning to help those he left behind. He shares his story in the new memoir, Gratitude in Low Voices.

Time now for another Stoop story, this time from Jim Karantonis, a psychiatric technician stationed at an army hospital during the Vietnam War. He describes an unusual game of baseball. 

Baltimore Heritage

Lions, demons, and devilish fiends--all can be spotted on Baltimore Heritage's gargoyle-themed walking tour of Downtown Baltimore. We hear from Executive Director Johns Hopkins about the nonprofit’s offerings, from tours of LGBT history sites in Mt. Vernon to a biking tour of delis and bakeries in East Baltimore--no spandex allowed! For more information about tours, click here. To suggest a tour, click here to contact Baltimore Heritage.

Our criminal justice system is the largest and most expensive in the world. Critics have zeroed in on the disproportionate impact of mass incarceration on African-Americans. But many African-Americans supported the war on crime that began in the 1970s. Why? We speak to Yale law professor James Forman Jr., about his book “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America”.

Johns Hopkins professor of psychiatry and mood disorders Kay Redfield Jamison, acclaimed author of An Unquiet Mind, trains her expertise on one of the most acclaimed poets of the 20th century in her new book Robert Lowell: Setting the River on Fire. We discuss how Lowell’s manic-depressive disease influenced his writing, the importance of his strength of character, and how common mania is among the creative.

Summoning the Snooze

Apr 11, 2017
Jacob Stewart/Flickr via Creative Commons

When you cannot sleep, the middle of the night can be a harrowing spot. Insomnia is all too familiar for many of us. Dr. Emerson Wickwire, director of the insomnia program at the University of Maryland Medical Center, joins us to talk about the causes of this maddening affliction and how best to summon the snooze. Original air date: November 30, 2016.

Sine Die 2017

Apr 10, 2017
Rachel Baye / WYPR

It’s Sine Die – or, translating loosely, “no tomorrow.” Whatever proposals Maryland’s legislators don’t act on by midnight will be let undone. We reflect on what passed, what died, and what elected officials are expected to take up again next year. Our analysts: WYPR Statehouse reporter Rachel Baye and political commentator Barry Rascovar.

Time now for another Stoop story. This week we hear a story from Mark Lowry about growing up in Baltimore’s Charles Village. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Rachel Baye / WYPR

Days before the General Assembly session ends, legislators are involved in heated arguments about whether state law should limit local police cooperation with federal immigration enforcement. Reporter Josh Hicks of the Washington Post fills us in.

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