On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

Time for the second installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series! Andrew Stephenson didn’t always want to be a lawyer. Growing up in Dublin, Ireland, Andrew learned a lot in the kitchen from his mother and dreamed of owning his own restaurant. After high school, he began working in kitchens. Eventually Andrew moved to London to start law school, but continued cooking, taking a job at a restaurant in a posh neighborhood called Primrose Hill. His story has been edited for brevity. 

Josh Koonce/Flickr via Creative Commons

Baltimore’s mayor is asking the state to chip in $30 million for police reforms she expects to be mandated by a consent decree with the U.S. Justice Department. That court-enforceable decree is still being worked out, but our guest tells us these changes are costly because cities like Baltimore have put off reforms for decades. Years of neglect mean that the remedies - such as a warning system to spot troublesome behavior by officers - will be expensive. Criminal justice expert Samuel Walker is Professor Emeritus of Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska. He has written more than a dozen books on policing and criminal justice, and has advised police departments across the country. 

We discuss a new novel about bootleggers, mobsters and baseball players -- specifically, the greatest player of all time, Babe Ruth, born and raised in Baltimore. The book is "The Babe Ruth Deception," and it’s the third book of fiction by historian David O. Stewart. His nonfiction works include books about James Madison, Aaron Burr, and the Constitutional Convention. David O. Stewart joins us to discuss the book. 

Google Maps

A long-awaited $23--and-a-half million-dollar development broke ground in East Baltimore last month. If all goes as planned, a dilapidated former pumping station will soon transform into the Baltimore Food Hub, a central location for food endeavors ranging from an urban farm to commercial production kitchens to a market. The Food Hub is a project of American Communities Trust, a national community development organization that works in low-income communities. China Boak Terrell, the CEO of American Communities Trust, joins us to talk about the Hub. 

GQ, The Nation, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, Esquire -- just a few of the publications that publish drawings by the celebrated political illustrator and satirist Steve Brodner. Brodner will be in Baltimore Thursday night to deliver a lecture at the Maryland Institute College of Art at 7pm, at the Fred Lazarus Center. He joins us to discuss what it's like to cover the current presidential campaign. 

summerbl4ck/Flickr via Creative Commons

Most of us have read or heard about the spread of the Zika virus: the serious birth defects, like microcephaly, that can result if a pregnant woman becomes infected, and the pressure to develop a vaccine against the virus. What many of us may not have given any thought to is whether such a vaccine would be tested on pregnant women. Because for the most part, pregnant women are not included in clinical drug trials for fear of the potential harm to the fetus. As a result, scientists just don’t know how safe most medications are for pregnant women. A group of bioethicists is pushing for change. They argue that neglecting to research the safety of drugs in pregnant women is unethical.  Carleigh Krubiner, a Faculty Research Scholar at the Johns Hopkins’ Berman Institute for Bioethics, joins us to explain. 

Julia Sergina/Flickr via Creative Commons

Roberto Busó-García heads a new Johns Hopkins film fund with a special focus on Baltimore. He joins us to tell us about it. Those who make the cut for the Saul Zaentz Innovation Fund in Film and Media get mentoring from experts in the industry, as well as cash, in some cases. The fellows include artists with in-depth experience and some who have never made a film. Have a great idea? You’re eligible. 

Do classical musicians have a role to play in advancing social justice? We talk to composer Judah Adashi, who is on the faculty of the Peabody Institute. Adashi is teaching a new workshop at the Peabody on Art and Activism, and he frequently takes on social issues in his work. He talks with us about art, activism, and the delicate balance between social critique and propaganda.  

The Best Medicine

Oct 10, 2016

Mental illness and comedy may seem like an unlikely combination, but a group of local improv performers has taken on the challenge. “The Best Medicine," coming this weekend to Baltimore’s Single Carrot Theatre, pairs improvisers with true stories solicited from the community. All the stories have something to do with mental illness. Ticket information available here.

Across the country, health insurers are raising rates or pulling out of the Obamacare exchanges. Could a single-payer system solve some of the problems? How would that work? What IS a single-payer system, anyway? Who wins, who loses? Dr. Bradley Herring, an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, breaks it down for us.

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