On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

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Emails of the Democratic National Committee were leaked this summer. Last year, a Chinese hack of the US Office of Personnel Management exposed the personal data of millions of Americans. So, how safe is the ballot box? Cybersecurity expert Dr. Richard Forno, Assistant Director of the UMBC Center for Cybersecurity, walks us through the potential vulnerabilities of voting systems in America.

Within a decade of its launch by Arunah Abell in 1837, the Baltimore Sun was so dominant that the U.S. president learned from the Sun--not from the War Department--that the U.S. had won its war with Mexico. In the 20th century, the Sun was one of three daily newspapers that FDR devoured with breakfast. The new book, "The Life of Kings," contains recollections by dozens of Sun writers and recalls the Sun’s reach and independence. We look back at the Sun's heyday with Stephens Broening, the Sun’s first op-ed page editor and co-editor of the book, “The Life of Kings: The Baltimore Sun and the Golden Age of the American Newspaper.” We’ll also hear from former Sun reporters Fraser Smith and Antero Pietela about their most memorable assignments and the future of print journalism.

On the first “On the Record,” with technology replacing more and more jobs, there’s more talk of a universal basic income--the idea of the government giving a minimal income to everyone, no strings attached. We speak with former labor boss Andy Stern. He and others, from the right and the left, are pushing the idea of a universal basic income, in which the federal government would pay everyone a monthly stipend, no strings attached. Stern's new book is: “Raising the Floor: How a Universal Basic Income Can Renew Our Economy and Rebuild the American Dream.”  

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