On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

"The Perpetual Line-Up: Unregulated Police Face Recognition in America" / Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law

Half of American adults may not know it, but their photos are in face-recognition databases used law enforcement, according to an investigation by a think tank at Georgetown Law. Police can compare millions of mug shots, driver’s license, and ID photos against images of unknown suspects. This technology is less accurate in identifying African American, younger, and female faces. And because African-Americas are more likely to be arrested, they are overrepresented in the databases. We talk to David Gray, law professor at the University of Maryland, who says this face-recognition technology raises questions about our right to privacy.

Time for the third installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. Today Congressman Elijah Cummings tells the story of the integration of Riverside Park Pool in south Baltimore, and how the experience affected him. His story has been edited for brevity. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and the Stoop podcast at stoopstorytelling.com

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Artist Joyce Scott, of Baltimore’s Sandtown neighborhood, crafts jewelry and sculptures that explore issues like racism, sexism, and war. Last month she was awarded a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, also known as a genius grant. We hear her thoughts on politics as performance art and on what this award means to her. “The idea that I could be that girl from two blocks from where Freddie Gray started the end of his life, that I could receive and make art," she says, "That is a giant thing that I must be responsible for.” 

yvonne slazar/Flickr via Creative Commons

We explore an unorthodox approach to preventing violence in the community. We’ll talk to Maryland shock-trauma surgeon Dr. Carnell Cooper, who for two decades has been intervening in the emergency room, as victims of violence recover, to help them change the patterns that led to that violence.  "We have an opportunity to save their lives," he says. "In fact we have maybe even a little bit of an obligation to try and do something beyond just patching them up.” Then, Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen fills us in on plans to expand the city’s Safe Streets outreach program into numerous city hospitals, beginning with Johns Hopkins Hospital.

H&S Bakery

John Paterakis Sr., the Baltimore-born baker, businessman, developer, political donor and philanthropist, died on Sunday, aged 87. We reflect on John Paterakis’s impact on Baltimore with WYPR’s senior news analyst Fraser Smith, who profiled Paterakis for the Baltimore Sun, and M. Jay Brodie, who headed the Baltimore Development Corporation for many years.

Garry Knight / Flickr via Creative Commons

Can social media posts, even hashtags and emojis, be analyzed to prevent violent crime? The victims of gun violence are often young people, and young people are also loyal users of social media. Desmond Patton, an associate professor in the School of Social Work at Columbia University and an affiliate with the research group Data & Society, says social media provides a forum for teens to express pain and grief, but those conversations can escalate into real world violence. 

Sheilah takes a guided tour of a new exhibit at the George Peabody Library on East Mount Vernon Place. The exhibit is called The Enigmatic Edgar A. Poe in Baltimore and Beyond and it features highlights from the Susan Jaffe Tane Collection of Edgar Allan Poe, one of the finest private collections of Poe materials in the world. Her guide is the exhibit’s curator, Gabrielle Dean. Gabrielle Dean is curator of Literary Rare Books and Manuscripts for the Sheridan Libraries of Johns Hopkins University. 

Jack Lyons/Flickr via Creative Commons

This weekend the Maryland Historical Society is screening "Maryland on Film III," two and a half hours of footage exploring the geography of our state. The screening includes some archival gems: a 1961 meditation on screen painting; a documentary about Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium; and “Little Castles,” a 1997 film about Formstone, the fake stone found on so many Baltimore rowhouses. Joe Tropea, Digital Projects Coordinator at the Maryland Historical Society, joins us to discuss the event. And Skizz Cyzyk, director of “Little Castles,” fills us in on the history of Formstone. 

Maryland’s jails hold hundreds of people who judges say could be released on bail, but the defendants haven’t come up with the cash to pay the 10% bail fee. This month Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh issued an opinion that it’s probably unconstitutional to hold defendants in jail because they can’t afford to pay.  Frosh says the system upends the lives of many charged with minor crimes -- and doesn’t make Maryland’s citizens safer.

And we talk to a bail bondsman who agrees bail should be set so people can pay, but thinks most people awaiting trial in jail should be behind bars.

Read the opinion from Attorney General Brian Frosh.

Time for the second installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series! Andrew Stephenson didn’t always want to be a lawyer. Growing up in Dublin, Ireland, Andrew learned a lot in the kitchen from his mother and dreamed of owning his own restaurant. After high school, he began working in kitchens. Eventually Andrew moved to London to start law school, but continued cooking, taking a job at a restaurant in a posh neighborhood called Primrose Hill. His story has been edited for brevity. 

Pages