On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

H&S Bakery

John Paterakis Sr., the Baltimore-born baker, businessman, developer, political donor and philanthropist, died on Sunday, aged 87. We reflect on John Paterakis’s impact on Baltimore with WYPR’s senior news analyst Fraser Smith, who profiled Paterakis for the Baltimore Sun, and M. Jay Brodie, who headed the Baltimore Development Corporation for many years.

Garry Knight / Flickr via Creative Commons

Can social media posts, even hashtags and emojis, be analyzed to prevent violent crime? The victims of gun violence are often young people, and young people are also loyal users of social media. Desmond Patton, an associate professor in the School of Social Work at Columbia University and an affiliate with the research group Data & Society, says social media provides a forum for teens to express pain and grief, but those conversations can escalate into real world violence. 

Sheilah takes a guided tour of a new exhibit at the George Peabody Library on East Mount Vernon Place. The exhibit is called The Enigmatic Edgar A. Poe in Baltimore and Beyond and it features highlights from the Susan Jaffe Tane Collection of Edgar Allan Poe, one of the finest private collections of Poe materials in the world. Her guide is the exhibit’s curator, Gabrielle Dean. Gabrielle Dean is curator of Literary Rare Books and Manuscripts for the Sheridan Libraries of Johns Hopkins University. 

Jack Lyons/Flickr via Creative Commons

This weekend the Maryland Historical Society is screening "Maryland on Film III," two and a half hours of footage exploring the geography of our state. The screening includes some archival gems: a 1961 meditation on screen painting; a documentary about Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium; and “Little Castles,” a 1997 film about Formstone, the fake stone found on so many Baltimore rowhouses. Joe Tropea, Digital Projects Coordinator at the Maryland Historical Society, joins us to discuss the event. And Skizz Cyzyk, director of “Little Castles,” fills us in on the history of Formstone. 

Maryland’s jails hold hundreds of people who judges say could be released on bail, but the defendants haven’t come up with the cash to pay the 10% bail fee. This month Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh issued an opinion that it’s probably unconstitutional to hold defendants in jail because they can’t afford to pay.  Frosh says the system upends the lives of many charged with minor crimes -- and doesn’t make Maryland’s citizens safer.

And we talk to a bail bondsman who agrees bail should be set so people can pay, but thinks most people awaiting trial in jail should be behind bars.

Read the opinion from Attorney General Brian Frosh.

Time for the second installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series! Andrew Stephenson didn’t always want to be a lawyer. Growing up in Dublin, Ireland, Andrew learned a lot in the kitchen from his mother and dreamed of owning his own restaurant. After high school, he began working in kitchens. Eventually Andrew moved to London to start law school, but continued cooking, taking a job at a restaurant in a posh neighborhood called Primrose Hill. His story has been edited for brevity. 

Josh Koonce/Flickr via Creative Commons

Baltimore’s mayor is asking the state to chip in $30 million for police reforms she expects to be mandated by a consent decree with the U.S. Justice Department. That court-enforceable decree is still being worked out, but our guest tells us these changes are costly because cities like Baltimore have put off reforms for decades. Years of neglect mean that the remedies - such as a warning system to spot troublesome behavior by officers - will be expensive. Criminal justice expert Samuel Walker is Professor Emeritus of Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska. He has written more than a dozen books on policing and criminal justice, and has advised police departments across the country. 

We discuss a new novel about bootleggers, mobsters and baseball players -- specifically, the greatest player of all time, Babe Ruth, born and raised in Baltimore. The book is "The Babe Ruth Deception," and it’s the third book of fiction by historian David O. Stewart. His nonfiction works include books about James Madison, Aaron Burr, and the Constitutional Convention. David O. Stewart joins us to discuss the book. 

Google Maps

A long-awaited $23--and-a-half million-dollar development broke ground in East Baltimore last month. If all goes as planned, a dilapidated former pumping station will soon transform into the Baltimore Food Hub, a central location for food endeavors ranging from an urban farm to commercial production kitchens to a market. The Food Hub is a project of American Communities Trust, a national community development organization that works in low-income communities. China Boak Terrell, the CEO of American Communities Trust, joins us to talk about the Hub. 

GQ, The Nation, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, Esquire -- just a few of the publications that publish drawings by the celebrated political illustrator and satirist Steve Brodner. Brodner will be in Baltimore Thursday night to deliver a lecture at the Maryland Institute College of Art at 7pm, at the Fred Lazarus Center. He joins us to discuss what it's like to cover the current presidential campaign. 

Pages