Sports at Large | WYPR

Sports at Large

Monday at 5:44 P.M.

Sports at Large is a weekly exploration of the issues and people who play and watch sports. SaL goes behind the headlines and stats to find the how and why, and the ways in which sports intersect with and influence our daily lives. SaL features interviews and commentaries from professionals and fans a like to tell a more complete story. One person described it as "a thinking fan’s guide to sports."

Milton Kent is a veteran of Baltimore sports media, having covered the World Series, the Final Four, NFL conference championship games and high schools over a career that spans over four decades. He currently teaches journalism at Morgan State University, where he is an advisor to the school newspaper, The MSU Spokesman. He and his wife live in Baltimore County. 

Contact Milton at sportsatlarge@gmail.com and on Twitter: @SportsAtLarge

Archive prior to December 2016.

 

 

Alex Schierholtz/flickr

For three years now, the Ravens have been model citizens on the subject of domestic violence, assiduously avoiding any player who had a direct connection to inflicting hurt on a woman or child.

The video of former running back Ray Rice that surfaced in the spring of 2014 and the fallout that followed pretty much ensured that team owner Steve Bischiotti would be highly circumspect bordering on hostile about any player carrying that baggage.

But Bischiotti and his brain trust have a potentially significant challenge to their stance, namely a pressing need and a player with domestic violence issues who could fill that need.

Brandon Marshall, who was just released by the New York Jets, is a six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver.

AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

There are few things more precious than the relationship between a boy and his mother.

It appears that relationship between Shaquille O’Neal and his mother, Lucille, may be enough to nip a bizarre feud in the bud.

"Ascendant" Baltimore

Feb 20, 2017
tedstake.monumentalsportsnetwork.com

Under the category of “It’s always nice to be wanted,” that was a really sweet civic kiss that Ted Leonsis threw at Charm City on the front of the local newspaper Sunday.

Leonsis, who owns the indoor sports teams in Washington and the arena they play in, called Baltimore "ascendant" in The Baltimore Sun, to explain why he bought two Arena Football League teams and placed one at Royal Farms Arena.

Indeed, Leonsis said that while people think it’s crazy for him to own both the Washington Valor and the Baltimore Brigade, he thinks the Brigade can stimulate Royal Farms Arena, create jobs and bring people into downtown.

wikipedia

Though we are both University of Maryland graduates, I don’t really know Under Armour founder and CEO Kevin Plank. We’ve never met and we don’t travel in the same social circles, so I really shouldn’t presume to speak for him.

That said, I’m guessing Plank had no idea the proverbial hail storm he set off last week by paying a compliment to President Donald Trump.

Shawne Alston Twitter

Ever so quietly last week, the NCAA took a long, overdue baby step toward making things right for the chattel that keeps college sports in business, namely the players.

The organization that governs collegiate athletics in this country and 11 college conferences reached a tentative agreement in a class action lawsuit filed three years ago by a former West Virginia running back.

Baltimoreravens.com

The life of an NFL owner is an exclusive one. There are, after all, only 31 members, not including the Green Bay Packers, who are owned by that Wisconsin community.

It’s a life that includes the best restaurant tables in any city and a level of celebrity commensurate with one’s willingness to accept it.

Members of said club are also subject to hero worship in a town. People take football seriously and the owner of a team is thought in some circles to be the keeper of a sacred flame, a monarch of sorts, if you will.

David Modell, who died two weeks ago of lung cancer, got as close to that throne as one can get.

G/flickr

The San Antonio Spurs scored a splashy win over the NBA champion Cleveland Cavaliers on the road Saturday night on national television. It was the kind of victory that could give the Spurs a big, psychological edge should the two teams meet in June in the league finals. But it was San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich who scored the biggest win Saturday, a triumph for free speech, just before the game with the Cavaliers.

Karen Mallonee/flickr

Are you a glass half-full or half-empty person?

If you’re an Orioles fan, your answer to that question based off the news of last week, may be determined by whether you take a long or short term view.

Joe Mixon and the Tape

Jan 9, 2017
Ervins Strauhmanis/flickr

In the coming NFL offseason, talent evaluators from all 32 teams, including the Ravens, will spend hundreds of hours watching game tapes. They’ll try to find the potential draftee who can make their team better in the short and long term.

Yet the most impactful tape of a prospective NFL player will have footage that has nothing to do with football action.

Joe Mixon is passing up his senior season at the University of Oklahoma to be a professional and there are reports that he’s one of the best running backs coming out of college. But all those reports, his workouts and his highlight tapes and their potential bearing on Mixon’s chance to make a roster pale in comparison to the footage of him punching a woman in the face in July 2014.

Jeff Weese/flickr

John Harbaugh deserves one more chance as the Ravens’ head coach.

Admittedly, that was not the first thought that rolled through my mind in the immediate wake of Sunday’s 27-10 season-ending loss to the Cincinnati Bengals, a performance that was the dictionary definition of the word desultory.

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