Affordable Care Act | WYPR

Affordable Care Act

Mind the gap. When the 2015 open enrollment period begins on Nov. 15 for plans sold on the individual market, consumers would be wise to act promptly to avoid a gap in coverage.

Failing to do so could leave you exposed to unexpected medical bills. (Uh-oh, appendicitis!) And you could also be hit with a penalty for not having health insurance that kicks in if you go without coverage for three months or more during the year.

Today is the last day for about 400,000 people to retain health insurance through federal healthcare insurance subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

Individuals who are currently receiving coverage but have failed to present the necessary documents verifying income and citizenship will be cut off.

While some are rushing to validate their subsidies, others are gearing up for the new open enrollment starting November 15.

Adrian Clark / Flickr / Creative Commons
Adrian Clark / Flickr / Creative Commons

Maryland's online insurance marketplace, the health exchange is being scrapped in favor of a system created in Connecticut. So, how will Maryland make sure that this around, things are done right? And will it be ready in time for the next open-enrollment period, which starts in November? With Sheilah Kast to answer those questions is Carolyn Quattrocki. She’s Acting Director of the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange. And, with us by phone from Connecticut is Kevin Counihan, CEO of that state’s exchange, Access Health CT.

Daniele Zanni / Flickr / Creative Commons

Thousands have been signing up for health insurance in the last few days ahead of tomorrow's sign-up deadline. Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, who has been the O'Malley-Brown administration's point man on health-care reform, offered to speak with us about it. Sheilah Kast reached him on his cell phone this morning.

flickr/sapiensstudio

Under the Affordable Care Act, people are more likely to receive care in community health centers and at home than in hospitals, which means new responsibilities for nurses.  As the state does its full sprint to educate the uninsured, we wanted to focus on how some of the most crucial players are adapting: nurses. 

redwolfoz / Creative Commons

About a third of emergency room visits in Maryland could have been handled in a primary care setting. Will the Affordable Care Act change that... and, if so, when?

Maryland’s insurance commissioner has approved premium rates for individual health insurance plans to be sold through the state’s new health benefits exchange under the Affordable Care Act.