Baltimore

P. Kenneth Burns

  Baltimore Police launched Monday two new digital methods for witnesses to send tips for their investigation into the murder of popular local rapper Tyriece Watson, also known as “Lor Scoota.”

Detectives are asking the public to text their tips, pictures, videos, Facebook Live and Periscope links to 443-902-4824. 

The public can also email files to homicidetips@baltimorepolice.org. People who report tips can remain anonymous.

“We’ll take it in Google Drive, we’ll take it in Dropbox; however you have it,” said police spokesman T.J. Smith.

Officer Caesar Goodson was acquitted Thursday of all charges against him in the police custody death of Freddie Gray.

Goodson, who drove the police van that transported Gray, faced the most serious charges in the case: second degree depraved heart murder, involuntary manslaughter, gross negligent manslaughter by vehicle, criminal negligent manslaughter by vehicle, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office.

P. Kenneth Burns

  A Baltimore judge is poised to deliver his verdict in the murder trial of an officer who drove the police van where a black arrestee's neck was broken, triggering some of the worst riots the city has ever seen.

Caesar Goodson was charged with murder, manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office.

P. Kenneth Burns

Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams was sharply critical Monday morning of prosecutors who argued that Officer Caesar Goodson gave Freddie Gray a rough ride in the back of his police van that lead to a fatal spine injury.

Rachel Baye

Mechanics were already busy at work at the Full Circle Service Center in Halethorpe when 30-year-old Brandon Carroll walked in. He said he was late because he had to meet with his parole officer.

"I was incarcerated for about six years,” he said. “I was hanging around the wrong people and basically was a product of my environment. I got caught with a gun, and that set me down for a little while.”

Revitalization without gentrification: a lot of syllables to describe an elusive goal. In urban neighborhoods, development too often means poor, usually minority residents are priced out. Cities have wrestled with this problem for decades. Now a group of Baltimore housing advocates think they have the answer. They’re asking the city to issue tens of millions of dollars in bonds in support of their plan. What’s the big fix? Community land trusts. This development model has been gaining steam in other cities. Now, as Baltimore seeks to solve the many problems it’s become famous for in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, advocates say community land trusts are key.

A new report by national nonprofit, the Corporation for Enterprise Development, finds that more than half of Baltimore families are “financially vulnerable.” This means a sudden job loss or medical emergency could knock them below the poverty line. Furthermore, half of the city’s households struggle to borrow money affordably, so they risk becoming trapped in debt by high interest rates. Arohi Pathek from CFED helps us compare this snapshot of Baltimore to Maryland’s overall picture. Plus, Sara Johnson, director of the Baltimore CASH Campaign, lays out policies with the potential to help low-income families - including ways to give them recognition for paying their bills on time.

Photo courtesy of candidate website

Today we welcome Deray Mckessoncontinuing our conversations with Baltimore’s 2016 mayoral candidates. The Black Lives Matter activist and former school administrator entered the Democratic primary minutes before the filing deadline. We’ll discuss the changes in policing and education Mckesson is calling for, and take your questions.

But first: Controversy at a Catholic university in western Maryland. Mount St. Mary’s student newspaper recently revealed a  plan to improve retention rates by weeding out struggling freshmen. Two faculty members critical of the plan were fired...and then reinstated. The faculty is calling for the president’s resignation. Scott Jaschik, founder of Inside Higher Ed, brings us the latest.

Kenneth Burns / WYPR

A sea change is coming to the Baltimore City Council: Nearly half the members are not seeking reelection this year. Three of the 15 are retiring, two are vacating their seats to run for mayor, and another is pursuing a judgeship. Luke Broadwater of The Baltimore Sun and WYPR news analyst Fraser Smith join us to discuss the implications.

Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby announced Sunday his intention to run for mayor in 2016, citing a need for new ideas for the city.

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