Baltimore A Year After Freddie Gray | WYPR

Baltimore A Year After Freddie Gray

Jonna McKone

There’s been a lot of attention focused on Baltimore’s youth in the year since Freddie Gray died. And much of that spotlight has been on Frederick Douglass High School. Images of dozens of Douglass students throwing rocks and bottles were captured on TV as protests turned violent the day of Gray’s funeral.  As part of our series, Baltimore: A Year after Freddie Gray, we look at how Douglass students are trying to take control of their own story.

Douglass students, their teachers and a group of reporters crammed into the school library on Wednesday to field questions about how the school has changed since Freddie Gray. Several students, two teachers, a school police officer and City Schools CEO Dr. Gregory Thornton, sat at the front of the room. Behind them were scrolling images of Baltimore residents photographed on city streets.  A scrum of cameras from local TV stations filmed from behind the audience. 

The first questions came from the students.

 

Rachel Baye

Mechanics were already busy at work at the Full Circle Service Center in Halethorpe when 30-year-old Brandon Carroll walked in. He said he was late because he had to meet with his parole officer.

"I was incarcerated for about six years,” he said. “I was hanging around the wrong people and basically was a product of my environment. I got caught with a gun, and that set me down for a little while.”

Being Nehemiah

Apr 20, 2016

In death, the name Freddie Gray became part of the national call for police reform. Quickly, though, the challenge widened. Every urban issue from unemployment, to education, to vacant houses, to public schools and the re-entry of ex-offenders was on the urgency agenda.  Gray grew up a victim or a product of them all. How urgent, though, would be question.