development | WYPR

development

DOMINIQUE MARIA BONESSI

Back in October, City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke moved to revive the city’s “Dollar House” program to revitalize blighted neighborhoods. On Wednesday, Councilman Zeke Cohen and a group of housing advocates delivered a petition with 20,000 signatures calling for more affordable housing in the city. And yesterday, the City Council had a hearing on Tax Increment Financing, or TIFs, like the $660 million deal Sagamore Development made with the city to develop Port Covington. WYPR’s city hall reporter Dominique Maria Bonessi joins Nathan Sterner to connect the dots.

A plan to revitalize Baltimore is set to land at the City Council today. It comes with the price tag of $10 billion, and no one knows where that money would come from. 

A Battle Royale is playing out over a proposed Royal Farms store and gas station in Towson. Opponents claim it’s an example of developers running roughshod in Baltimore County. 

Revitalization without gentrification: a lot of syllables to describe an elusive goal. In urban neighborhoods, development too often means poor, usually minority residents are priced out. Cities have wrestled with this problem for decades. Now a group of Baltimore housing advocates think they have the answer. They’re asking the city to issue tens of millions of dollars in bonds in support of their plan. What’s the big fix? Community land trusts. This development model has been gaining steam in other cities. Now, as Baltimore seeks to solve the many problems it’s become famous for in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, advocates say community land trusts are key.