Education | WYPR

Education

Education reporting on WYPR is supported in part by the Sylvan-Laureate Foundation.

Being a first year teacher often means instructing with limited classroom experience and Baltimore City Public Schools, like many urban school districts, has more inexperienced teachers than suburban school districts.  A local program, called Urban Teachers, grown out of former educators’ experience working in Baltimore’s central office, is trying to change that.  

Ms. Tierra Woods is greeting her 4th grade math class as they shuffle into their seats. She’s a first year teacher, but this isn’t her first time leading a class.

Governor's Office via YouTube

As expected, Governor Larry Hogan signed an executive order today, requiring all Maryland public schools to open after Labor Day, beginning next year. But opponents questioned its legality, and the governor’s motives.

In making his announcement on the boardwalk at Ocean City, the governor said it will help the state’s economy, because families will be able to extend their summer vacations.

Scholars sing to start the day at Play On Purpose's Summer Camp
Jonna McKone

Every parent faces challenges finding constructive opportunities for their children in the summer while school’s out. But that process can be even more difficult for parents who can’t afford day camps.  

On a hot, August morning, about 75 kids play, sing and chat in the cafeteria of ConneXions, a public charter school in the Mondawmin neighborhood of West Baltimore. Play on Purpose (POP) runs a free summer program here that includes curriculum through the Freedom School, a program of the Children’s Defense Fund. Freedom Schools teach culturally relevant reading and local African American history at over 12,000 sites around the nation to, in part, stem the tide of summer learning loss.

Jonna McKone

The standard picture of a debate team looks something like this: white students in jackets and rep ties from schools like Dartmouth and Princeton. But that’s changing, especially in Baltimore, which has developed a reputation for producing some of the most accomplished high school and college debaters in the country.

Take rising 10th grader at Baltimore City College, Nicolas Broaddus, who stands in front of the  judges at the Eddie Conway Liberation Institute’s debate competition. Clad in a dashiki he’s talking about things that "...constitute the domestic aspect of the US transnational network of secret prisons and black sites..."

Nicole Price, 21st Century School Building Plan

The Baltimore City school system is spending $1 billion to update and renovate nearly two dozen overcrowded and outdated schools as part of the 21st Century Schools Building Plan. But closing schools and buildings and moving students, no matter the goal, is not easy, especially for communities that have lost many of their public institutions over the years.

Marvin Walker’s daughter attends Samuel F.B. Morse Elementary School in a Southwest Baltimore neighborhood of vacant homes and broken sidewalks. It’s a school that’s slated to close and its students are to move to nearby Frederick Elementary, which is being modernized to accommodate more students under the system’s 21st Century School Building Plan.

Baltimore’s school system has embarked on an ambitious project to renovate, replace and combine dozens of the oldest schools in the state over the next four years.   

The $1 billion effort aims to shutter and combine dozens of schools and renovate or replace at least 23 – all by the spring of 2021.  

A 2012 report by the Jacobs Project Management Company, a consulting firm, found that 85 percent, or 138 of the schools are in “poor” or “very poor” condition.

A power issue at Baltimore City schools headquarters on North Avenue has knocked the system’s web site off line and snarled some plans for final exams.  

School employees, who wouldn’t give their names, say some teachers can’t get into the online tools they need to administer finals and two teachers said there were delays in administering Maryland’s High School Assessments or HSAs due to internet issues.

Headquarters school employees say the power went out at about noon yesterday, forcing them to evacuate the building through dark stairwells without the aid of an intercom system or emergency lighting.

The long-serving president of the Baltimore Teacher’s Union, Marietta English, withstood her first serious election challenge in years yesterday from Kimberly Mooney, a teacher and union representative. The unofficial results were English winning by about 180 votes out of more than 1,200 votes cast.

Mooney’s campaign focused on issues like teacher retention, reforming evaluations and building greater transparency. But others in the 6,000 member union felt the most recent contract English negotiated was a strong one and that those who are disgruntled should simply get more involved.

This spring every third grader in the city received a colorful, graphic textbook thanks to the work of graphic designer and educator Becky Slogeris.  On a rainy day, Ms. Heather Tuttle’s third grade social studies classroom at Lake Montebello Elementary in Northeast Baltimore, reads from a book written just for Baltimore City kids.

"Jane Jacobs was a writer and thinker about cities," Tawnaja Hilton reads. "Jane did not learn about cities from books or schools. Instead she learned about cities by watching people use them in every li- in everyday life."

Jonna McKone

There’s been a lot of attention focused on Baltimore’s youth in the year since Freddie Gray died. And much of that spotlight has been on Frederick Douglass High School. Images of dozens of Douglass students throwing rocks and bottles were captured on TV as protests turned violent the day of Gray’s funeral.  As part of our series, Baltimore: A Year after Freddie Gray, we look at how Douglass students are trying to take control of their own story.

Douglass students, their teachers and a group of reporters crammed into the school library on Wednesday to field questions about how the school has changed since Freddie Gray. Several students, two teachers, a school police officer and City Schools CEO Dr. Gregory Thornton, sat at the front of the room. Behind them were scrolling images of Baltimore residents photographed on city streets.  A scrum of cameras from local TV stations filmed from behind the audience. 

The first questions came from the students.

 

Public universities that serve low income students have struggled for years with low graduation rates.  Historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs, including those in Maryland, face this problem especially acutely.

Three Coppin State University students, all in their mid-twenties, sit in their student union talking about the challenges of working toward a bachelor’s degree. 

"My name is William Lessane. I am 27 years old. Technically at Coppin I’m a sophomore but right on the cusp of being a junior. I am from Baltimore City, Park Heights - West Baltimore area. To be honest with you, I’ve been in college for 10 years on and off. I’ve struggled in trying to achieve the associate’s degree. Now, I’m finding new struggles in trying to achieve the bachelor’s degree."

Flickr Creative Commons//David Robert Crews

Thousands of Baltimore City eighth graders found out last week whether they got into the high school they hoped to attend, or whether they’re going somewhere else next year. Same thing for fifth graders applying to middle schools. The policy is called school choice. In the first of a two-part series, we look at what is and isn’t working with school choice.

The theory behind school choice is that where you live shouldn’t dictate where you go to school. Just because you’re growing up in a poor area, you shouldn’t be limited to a badly performing neighborhood school.

Baltimore’s schools started their choice program in 2002 and during that same period began closing troubled schools and creating smaller high schools with specialized focuses.  The idea is to allow students and families to select the school that best fits them.

At 7:30 a.m. Monday through Friday, you'll find Mark Gaither standing on Gough Street in southeast Baltimore. He's outside Wolfe Street Academy, the neighborhood elementary school where he's the principal.

Gaither has a huge umbrella in case it rains, and thick gloves for when it snows. He's here each morning to greet students and families as they come to school — which should make for at least 225 "good mornings."

Democrats To Hogan: Give Schools The Money

Nov 9, 2015

Democratic House and Senate leaders in Annapolis renewed their call Monday for Gov. Larry Hogan to spend money they fenced off for schools.

BALTIMORE (AP) — The University System of Maryland has named a New York state educator president of Coppin State University.

The Board of Regents announced Tuesday that it had appointed Maria Thompson, who is provost and vice president for academic affairs at the State University of New York at Oneonta.

carmichaellibrary / Flickr / Creative Commons

  Last fall, more than 153,000 students were studying at one of the dozen schools in Maryland’s public university system. That’s about 28-percent more than were enrolled in 2002, when William E. “Brit” Kirwan began his tenure as Chancellor of Maryland’s public university system.

 

Taylor Branch on Citizenship, Freedom, and Civil Rights

Apr 21, 2014
Stephanie Hughes

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch wrote the acclaimed America in the King Years trilogy, which is considered the seminal history of the American civil rights movement. Taylor Branch is teaching a course this semester on the subject of Citizenship and Freedom at the University of Baltimore, which is available online to people around the world. 

Should College Still Be Four Years?

Mar 24, 2014

The University of Baltimore is announcing a new program to encourage students to graduate in four years. Right now, just around 12 percent of the students does.  The school calls the program “Finish4Free,” and it'll be offered to this year’s crop of freshmen.  We talk about it with President Robert Bogomolny.

Editor B/flickr

Maryland is one of 45 states that has adopted what’s called the Common Core standards for curriculum in public schools.  The Maryland State Board of Education adopted them in June 2010, but this is the school year the standards are being implemented – and the movement against them by some parents and teachers is building steam.

Maryland Family Network

  November 6, 2013

Preschool plays an important role in preparing children to succeed in kindergarten.  Publicly funded pre-K helps ensure that children of all income levels have access to preschool.

For more on this topic and others, visit marylandfamilynetwork.org

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