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Education

Public universities that serve low income students have struggled for years with low graduation rates.  Historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs, including those in Maryland, face this problem especially acutely.

Three Coppin State University students, all in their mid-twenties, sit in their student union talking about the challenges of working toward a bachelor’s degree. 

"My name is William Lessane. I am 27 years old. Technically at Coppin I’m a sophomore but right on the cusp of being a junior. I am from Baltimore City, Park Heights - West Baltimore area. To be honest with you, I’ve been in college for 10 years on and off. I’ve struggled in trying to achieve the associate’s degree. Now, I’m finding new struggles in trying to achieve the bachelor’s degree."

Flickr Creative Commons//David Robert Crews

Thousands of Baltimore City eighth graders found out last week whether they got into the high school they hoped to attend, or whether they’re going somewhere else next year. Same thing for fifth graders applying to middle schools. The policy is called school choice. In the first of a two-part series, we look at what is and isn’t working with school choice.

The theory behind school choice is that where you live shouldn’t dictate where you go to school. Just because you’re growing up in a poor area, you shouldn’t be limited to a badly performing neighborhood school.

Baltimore’s schools started their choice program in 2002 and during that same period began closing troubled schools and creating smaller high schools with specialized focuses.  The idea is to allow students and families to select the school that best fits them.

At 7:30 a.m. Monday through Friday, you'll find Mark Gaither standing on Gough Street in southeast Baltimore. He's outside Wolfe Street Academy, the neighborhood elementary school where he's the principal.

Gaither has a huge umbrella in case it rains, and thick gloves for when it snows. He's here each morning to greet students and families as they come to school — which should make for at least 225 "good mornings."

Democrats To Hogan: Give Schools The Money

Nov 9, 2015

Democratic House and Senate leaders in Annapolis renewed their call Monday for Gov. Larry Hogan to spend money they fenced off for schools.

BALTIMORE (AP) — The University System of Maryland has named a New York state educator president of Coppin State University.

The Board of Regents announced Tuesday that it had appointed Maria Thompson, who is provost and vice president for academic affairs at the State University of New York at Oneonta.

carmichaellibrary / Flickr / Creative Commons

  Last fall, more than 153,000 students were studying at one of the dozen schools in Maryland’s public university system. That’s about 28-percent more than were enrolled in 2002, when William E. “Brit” Kirwan began his tenure as Chancellor of Maryland’s public university system.

 

Taylor Branch on Citizenship, Freedom, and Civil Rights

Apr 21, 2014
Stephanie Hughes

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch wrote the acclaimed America in the King Years trilogy, which is considered the seminal history of the American civil rights movement. Taylor Branch is teaching a course this semester on the subject of Citizenship and Freedom at the University of Baltimore, which is available online to people around the world. 

Should College Still Be Four Years?

Mar 24, 2014

The University of Baltimore is announcing a new program to encourage students to graduate in four years. Right now, just around 12 percent of the students does.  The school calls the program “Finish4Free,” and it'll be offered to this year’s crop of freshmen.  We talk about it with President Robert Bogomolny.

Editor B/flickr

Maryland is one of 45 states that has adopted what’s called the Common Core standards for curriculum in public schools.  The Maryland State Board of Education adopted them in June 2010, but this is the school year the standards are being implemented – and the movement against them by some parents and teachers is building steam.

Maryland Family Network

  November 6, 2013

Preschool plays an important role in preparing children to succeed in kindergarten.  Publicly funded pre-K helps ensure that children of all income levels have access to preschool.

For more on this topic and others, visit marylandfamilynetwork.org

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