Elections | WYPR

Elections

Election coverage from WYPR and NPR.

Karen Hosler / WYPR

Despite a chilly, rainy election day, following an eleventh hour barrage of negative ads, Democratic challenger Gavin Buckley has won the Annapolis mayoral race, handily defeating incumbent Republican Mike Pantelides.  WYPR's Karen Hosler has been following the race and talks with Nathan Sterner about what happened.

Jonna McKone

 

 

Hundreds of protesters gathered in Baltimore’s Station North neighborhood last night to voice their frustration with Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton in the race for president.

 

Police, who estimated the crowd at upwards of 600, said the protesters were mostly orderly, though some blocked roadways and sat down in the streets.

 

Officers detained three people, two men and a woman. The men were released, but the woman, identified as Stephanie Applegate, 25, of the 1600 block of Charmuth Road in Lutherville, was charged with failure to obey the lawful order of a police officer.

Not rigged

Nov 10, 2016
Tom Chalkley

WYPR's senior news analyst reminds us voting is a celebration of democracy threatened by claims of rigged outcomes and fraudulent campaigns to stop non-existent voter fraud.

Rachel Baye

When it comes to women in politics, Maryland has been a national leader for decades. It was the first state to have a bipartisan women’s legislative caucus, and it ranks seventh nationwide in terms of the portion of women in the state legislature.

Sen. Barbara Mikulski is a large part of the reason for Maryland’s legacy of woman leadership, said Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. A 30-year Senate veteran, Mikulski is known as the “dean” of women in the chamber and a leader on women’s rights.

Mikulski is retiring when her term ends in January, and on Tuesday, Maryland voters elected Democratic U.S. Rep. Chris Van Hollen to fill her seat. The result is Maryland’s first all-male congressional delegation since 1971.

The transition to Pugh begins

Nov 9, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

Catherine Pugh began outlining plans for her administration at a news conference Wednesday morning, her first as Baltimore’s mayor-elect.

For starters, Police Commissioner Kevin Davis will stay, but longtime city Housing Commissioner Paul Graziano will be out.  And she wants to end the city-state partnership that has run the schools since the late 90s.

John Lee

Baltimore County Republicans gathered to watch the returns last night in Essex, a GOP stronghold where the party faithful became more convinced the election was in the bag for Donald Trump. 

Rachel Baye

Despite the grim returns in national races, Maryland Democrats celebrated victories in House and Senate races.

Congressman Chris Van Hollen defeated Republican Kathy Szeliga for the open Senate seat vacated by retiring Senator Barbara Mikulski. State Senator Jamie Raskin won his race to replace Van Hollen in congress and former Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown won his race for Congress.

Pugh staves off Dixon and others

Nov 9, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

State Senator Catherine Pugh has staved off a late effort from former Mayor Sheila Dixon to become the mayor-elect of Baltimore City.  Pugh also defeated Republican Alan Walden and the Green Party’s Joshua Harris in the process.

Searching for black Republicans in Baltimore

Nov 8, 2016
Taylor Haire

It’s no secret that Baltimore is a heavily Democratic, and majority black, city. And it’s no secret that African Americans have been the Democrats’ strongest voting block for decades. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t Republicans who are black out there, running for office in Baltimore.

The rallies and debates, the tweets and the fundraisers, the wearying last-minute swings through the same half-dozen or so battleground states — all that is winding down at last.

Today it was time for the two major presidential candidates to perform the Election Day ritual of casting their own votes, just like average Joes, except for the fact that average Joes aren't usually trailed by dozens of reporters and TV cameras.

Speaking in North Carolina on the final day of the presidential campaign, Republican nominee Donald Trump urged voters to go to the polls and deliver an Election Day upset.

"It's going to be Brexit plus, plus, plus," he said Monday, referring to the surprise victory in last June's referendum in which the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union.

Polls are not the only place people look to for guidance to Election Day outcomes. Lots of people believe in bellwethers.

The first two things to know about bellwethers is that there's no letter "a" in the word, and bellwethers don't have anything to do with predicting the weather. The name refers to the neutered rams that shepherds use to guide flocks in the right direction. The wether trots along when the shepherd calls, the bell at his neck jangles, and the other sheep come ambling after him.

From pretty much the very start of this election season, Donald Trump grabbed the media by the press pass. He didn't even wait. As Trump, a former reality show host, once said in a slightly different context, "When you're a star, they let you do it."

Aside from the cliches that it all comes down to turnout and that the only poll that counts is the one on Election Day, one more truism that talking heads will repeat endlessly Tuesday is that demographics are destiny.

It may make you want to throw a shoe at the TV (or radio), but (as they say) cliches are cliches for a reason. Breaking the electorate into these smaller chunks tells a lot about what people like and dislike about a candidate, not to mention how a rapidly changing electorate is changing the fundamentals of U.S. presidential politics.

No matter who wins the presidential election on Tuesday, it's nearly certain Congress will be more narrowly divided come January.

And with no clear mandate likely coming out of 2016, there is little reason to be overly optimistic that the next Congress can escape the cycle of unproductivity and polarization that has gripped Washington in recent years.


The 115th Congress: Political Dynamics

With little chance of a Democratic House takeover in the 2016 election, the two likeliest scenarios are:

Maryland Voices: Out of the polls

Nov 4, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

What do most Baltimore City voters fear as they cast their ballots?  That Donald Trump will be elected the next president of these United States of America…North America.

Rachel Baye

This post was updated at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 4.

Early voting ended Thursday, and record numbers of Maryland residents cast ballots before Election Day this year. Here is a look at the numbers:

WYPR 2016 Election Coverage

Nov 3, 2016

*WYPR will be updating this page throughout election night as local and national results roll in. 

The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into the vandalizing and burning of a black church in Mississippi. "Vote Trump" had been spray-painted on a wall.

Local authorities are still searching for the person or people responsible for the fire, which they have identified as an arson.

"When firefighters arrived at Hopewell Missionary Baptist Church Tuesday night, they found it in flames, and the 'Vote Trump' slogan written in silver spray paint on the outside wall of the church," Mark Rigsby of Mississippi Public Broadcasting reports.

Americans will decide more than 150 state ballot measures on Tuesday — up slightly from two years ago. That puts a lot of pressure on voters to study up on everything from marijuana legalization to gun control to the death penalty.

Californians in particular have a lot of homework to do. With 17 measures, their state has the longest ballot in the country this year. On top of that, there are 650 local measures around the state to decide on.

Rachel Baye

With Election Day less than a week away, Sen. Ben Cardin and Rep. Chris Van Hollen visited Baltimore's Lexington Market on Wednesday to remind voters to go to the polls.

President Obama is vouching for Hillary Clinton in his latest direct appeal to millennial voters.

Speaking to Now This News, Obama made his first public statements about the FBI's renewed focus on evidence possibly tied to Clinton's private State Department email server.

"I know her; I trust her," Obama said. "And you know, I wouldn't be supporting her if I didn't have absolute confidence in her integrity and her interest in making sure that young people have a better future."

When it comes to health care, the choice between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump comes down to whether to keep, or trash, the Affordable Care Act.

Trump says he wants to repeal and replace the health care law that is responsible for insuring about 20 million people, while Clinton has vowed to retain it and even expand its reach.

Here are the candidates' plans:


HILLARY CLINTON

  • Keep and build on Obamacare
  • Offer a tax credit of up to $5,000 to offset out-of-pocket costs over 5 percent of income

A week ago, Hillary Clinton was looking to run up the score against Donald Trump. Her campaign was running ads in Texas and planning a trip to the traditionally red state of Arizona.

Today, she heads out on that trip, but in a presidential election that has now seen a tightened race from where it was a week and a half ago.

Jonna McKone

Election Day is just a week away and WYPR reporters have been talking to voters around the state about the candidates for president for our series, Maryland Voices.

Theresa Thompson Flickr Creative Commons

Here’s a thought to ponder that some may find scary as we prepare to celebrate Halloween: The Baltimore City Council will surely be transformed after the election next week.

Six City Council incumbents decided not to run in the primary last April. Robert Curran, Rochelle “Rikki” Spector and Helen Holton are retiring for various reasons.  Nick Mosby and Carl Stokes chose to run for Mayor instead of for their council seats. James Kraft ran for Baltimore Circuit Court judge. Two other City Council incumbents, William “Pete” Welch in the 9th District and Warren Branch in the 13th, were unseated in the primary by fellow Democrats. That means that – no matter what happens on Election Day -- at least eight out of 14 seats on the council will be occupied by first time legislators.

What does that mean for the future of Charm City? Today, we bring you a Reporters’ Roundtable with three reporters who follow all things Baltimore very closely. Jayne Miller is an award winning investigative reporter for WBAL Television.  She is a "force of nature," according to the City Paper.  Luke Broadwater covers the city for the Baltimore Sun, and Kenneth Burns is the metro reporter covering Baltimore for WYPR. They joined host Tom Hall in the studio for a breakdown of the interesting council races across 14 Districts, and some prognostication as to how this large class of newbies will get along with veteran Council President Jack Young if he, too, wins reelection, which seems likely, and the rest of their Council colleagues.

Ruppersberger, McDonough campaigns

Delegate Pat McDonough, the Republican running for Congress in Maryland’s second district, is predicting massive voter fraud in the state. But Dutch Ruppersberger, the incumbent Democrat, vigorously challenged that allegation as both men appeared on WYPR’s Midday.

Rachel Baye

In addition to the candidates on the ballot this year, Maryland has one statewide ballot measure. A “yes” vote on the measure, Question 1, would change what happens when the state attorney general or comptroller leaves office between normal election cycles.

Why the 1st District council race is a real contest

Oct 27, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

Republicans believe they can achieve something for the first time since the 1940s; elect a member of their party to the Baltimore City Council.

It started when Republican Larry Hogan took the city’s first councilmanic district on the way to Government House (the governor’s residence) two years ago.  The GOP began thinking they might be able to break the Democrats’ stranglehold on City Hall.

The mayoral election hasn't happened yet, but Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about transitions from William Donald Schaefer to Kurt Schmoke all the way to...Catherine Pugh?

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