Elections | WYPR

Elections

Election coverage from WYPR and NPR.

Americans will decide more than 150 state ballot measures on Tuesday — up slightly from two years ago. That puts a lot of pressure on voters to study up on everything from marijuana legalization to gun control to the death penalty.

Californians in particular have a lot of homework to do. With 17 measures, their state has the longest ballot in the country this year. On top of that, there are 650 local measures around the state to decide on.

Rachel Baye

With Election Day less than a week away, Sen. Ben Cardin and Rep. Chris Van Hollen visited Baltimore's Lexington Market on Wednesday to remind voters to go to the polls.

President Obama is vouching for Hillary Clinton in his latest direct appeal to millennial voters.

Speaking to Now This News, Obama made his first public statements about the FBI's renewed focus on evidence possibly tied to Clinton's private State Department email server.

"I know her; I trust her," Obama said. "And you know, I wouldn't be supporting her if I didn't have absolute confidence in her integrity and her interest in making sure that young people have a better future."

When it comes to health care, the choice between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump comes down to whether to keep, or trash, the Affordable Care Act.

Trump says he wants to repeal and replace the health care law that is responsible for insuring about 20 million people, while Clinton has vowed to retain it and even expand its reach.

Here are the candidates' plans:


HILLARY CLINTON

  • Keep and build on Obamacare
  • Offer a tax credit of up to $5,000 to offset out-of-pocket costs over 5 percent of income

A week ago, Hillary Clinton was looking to run up the score against Donald Trump. Her campaign was running ads in Texas and planning a trip to the traditionally red state of Arizona.

Today, she heads out on that trip, but in a presidential election that has now seen a tightened race from where it was a week and a half ago.

Jonna McKone

Election Day is just a week away and WYPR reporters have been talking to voters around the state about the candidates for president for our series, Maryland Voices.

Theresa Thompson Flickr Creative Commons

Here’s a thought to ponder that some may find scary as we prepare to celebrate Halloween: The Baltimore City Council will surely be transformed after the election next week.

Six City Council incumbents decided not to run in the primary last April. Robert Curran, Rochelle “Rikki” Spector and Helen Holton are retiring for various reasons.  Nick Mosby and Carl Stokes chose to run for Mayor instead of for their council seats. James Kraft ran for Baltimore Circuit Court judge. Two other City Council incumbents, William “Pete” Welch in the 9th District and Warren Branch in the 13th, were unseated in the primary by fellow Democrats. That means that – no matter what happens on Election Day -- at least eight out of 14 seats on the council will be occupied by first time legislators.

What does that mean for the future of Charm City? Today, we bring you a Reporters’ Roundtable with three reporters who follow all things Baltimore very closely. Jayne Miller is an award winning investigative reporter for WBAL Television.  She is a "force of nature," according to the City Paper.  Luke Broadwater covers the city for the Baltimore Sun, and Kenneth Burns is the metro reporter covering Baltimore for WYPR. They joined host Tom Hall in the studio for a breakdown of the interesting council races across 14 Districts, and some prognostication as to how this large class of newbies will get along with veteran Council President Jack Young if he, too, wins reelection, which seems likely, and the rest of their Council colleagues.

Ruppersberger, McDonough campaigns

Delegate Pat McDonough, the Republican running for Congress in Maryland’s second district, is predicting massive voter fraud in the state. But Dutch Ruppersberger, the incumbent Democrat, vigorously challenged that allegation as both men appeared on WYPR’s Midday.

Rachel Baye

In addition to the candidates on the ballot this year, Maryland has one statewide ballot measure. A “yes” vote on the measure, Question 1, would change what happens when the state attorney general or comptroller leaves office between normal election cycles.

Why the 1st District council race is a real contest

Oct 27, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

Republicans believe they can achieve something for the first time since the 1940s; elect a member of their party to the Baltimore City Council.

It started when Republican Larry Hogan took the city’s first councilmanic district on the way to Government House (the governor’s residence) two years ago.  The GOP began thinking they might be able to break the Democrats’ stranglehold on City Hall.

The mayoral election hasn't happened yet, but Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about transitions from William Donald Schaefer to Kurt Schmoke all the way to...Catherine Pugh?

Dixon disses election results - again

Oct 25, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

Former Mayor Sheila Dixon insists she’s not a sore loser. But during an appearance on WYPR’s Midday Tuesday, she repeated her charge that questions still linger about the integrity of the results of the primary election she lost in April.

Rachel Baye

  

In Western Maryland, politics can be a sensitive subject.

The open seat at City Hall

Oct 20, 2016
Pugh and Harris: P. Kenneth Burns/Walden: Walden For Mayor campaign

For the first time since 1999, the seat for Baltimore Mayor is open because Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake isn’t seeking a second elected term in office.

On November 8, city residents will have a choice between Democrat Catherine Pugh, Republican Alan Walden and the Green Party’s Joshua Harris.

For nearly half a century, the general election has been a mere formality for the Democratic candidate running to lead Charm City.  That was evident when Rawlings-Blake commented on the race in September.

Youtube

If you go around asking people who they plan to vote for, for president this year, you will find many are passionate about their choices. And that choice often has a lot to do with not liking the other candidate.

Take Liz Freedman, who lives in Reisterstown and plans to vote for Hillary Clinton.

"I could never vote for Donald Trump," Freedman said. "He is a misogynist."

Then there is Ed Aldridge, who lives in Essex.

"Trump all the way," he said. "Hillary will run the country into the ground."

How much longer?

Oct 13, 2016
Tom Chalkley

WYPR's senior news analyst asks the question many of us are asking. Can this election please be over?

Sheila’s back, but can she win?

Oct 11, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

Former Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon announced she will try to get her job back as a write in candidate for the general election.

Dixon filed the paperwork Tuesday before a news conference.  She acknowledged her newly revived campaign is going to be challenging.

“I know this is a uphill battle.  But I know that in the next four weeks, were gonna educate people in the ‘ABC’s’ of what it means to write-in a candidate,” she said.

She also added that her campaign is going to be “organic” and “grassroots.”

YouTube

Repealing Obamacare has become a litmus test for many Republicans seeking federal office. But Republican Senate candidate Kathy Szeliga said Friday she wouldn’t vote to repeal the federal healthcare law.

Fraser Smith and John Fritze, of the Baltimore Sun's Washington Bureau, talk about the changes in Clinton v Trump polling since the presidential nominees debated in September at Hofstra University.

John Lee

Republican Senate candidate Kathy Szeliga said Tuesday that her top priority if she is elected would be to fix management problems at the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. The delegate from Baltimore County made the comments while speaking with WYPR’s Tom Hall on Midday.

Rachel Baye

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Kathy Szeliga makes no secret of the fact that she has been endorsed by Gov. Larry Hogan in her bid to replace retiring Sen. Barbara Mikulski.

Fraser Smith and Karen Hosler, of the WYPR news team, talk about Republican efforts to retake Maryland's Sixth Congressional District seat with a 74-year-old "young gun."

Rachel Baye

In a speech in Baltimore Monday afternoon, Donald Trump promised the National Guard Association of the United States that he would support military growth and defeat ISIS if elected president.

John Lee

On a recent evening at the Birdland Sports Bar on Belair Road, Kathy Szeliga was making her pitch to about 30 people, most of them already on board with her campaign.

“36 years ago, Mark and I eloped,” Szeliga said. “We had five dollars in our pocket, minimum wage jobs and no car.”

But they went on to start a construction business. Szeliga plans to use her ‘pull yourself up by your bootstraps’ story to contrast herself with her opponent for Maryland’s open U.S. Senate seat, Democratic Congressman Chris Van Hollen.

“You know, Ivy League, privileged white guy versus, you know the blue collar small business owner,” Szeliga said.

Voters Organized for the Integrity of City Elections, VOICE, filed a complaint in U.S. District Court Thursday challenging the certification of Baltimore’s primary election results.

The citizens group is seeking a new primary election because of alleged irregularities that occurred primary day in April. Among other things, the group charges that election judges were hired without being trained.

The day after former Mayor Sheila Dixon announced she wouldn’t seek a recount in Baltimore’s Democratic mayoral primary, the state Board of Elections de-certified those results and began a review. 

sarbanes.house.gov

This year, Wednesday means politics on Maryland Morning, and we begin today with a conversation with Congressman John Sarbanes, who has represented MD’s third Congressional District for the past nine years.  Last week, he garnered 87% of the vote in the Democratic Primary.  He’ll face Republican Challenger Mark Plaster in the November election.  This morning, he joins Tom to comment on the tumultuous presidential campaign, and to talk about his efforts to achieve campaign finance reform and  to curb the national epidemic of opioid addiction.    

Then we'll take a closer look at the surprise ouster Tuesday of Baltimore City School Board CEO Gregory Thornton, and the controversially secretive selection of his replacement, former city schools administrator Sonja Santelises. Tom is joined on the phone by Baltimore Sun education reporter Erica Green.

Plus, we’ll meet the newly-appointed director of the Baltimore Museum of Art.  In August, Christopher Bedford will leave the Rose Museum at Brandeis University to take over the BMA as it begins its second century housing some of the world’s great artistic treasures. He joins Tom on the phone from New York City.

sarbanes.house.gov

    

Wednesday means politics on Maryland Morning, and we begin today with Rep. John Sarbanes, live in Studio A.  Congressman Sarbanes, who lives with his family in Towson, is a Democrat who has represented Maryland’s 3rd Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2007. He sailed through last month’s primary election, winning 87% of the Democratic vote. His far-flung district includes parts of Baltimore County and Baltimore City but also narrow slices of Howard, Montgomery and Anne Arundel counties, including Annapolis. It’s been called one of the most gerrymandered congressional districts in the country, and it heavily favors Democrats.

The 53-year-old incumbent will face businessman, lawyer and physician Mark Plaster, who won the Republican primary last week. The 3rd District includes a very diverse set of constituents within its serpentine boundaries. Congressman Sarbanes has a wide pallet of policy interests. He is a national voice on campaign finance reform. His recent initiatives have addressed everything from the opioid abuse crisis to climate change, solar energy, and environmental education.

Catch up with these interviews from NPR's special election coverage of the primaries in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island, hosted by Scott Detrow and Audie Cornish.

Ed Rendell, former governor of Pennsylvania and Clinton supporter

On why Sanders has done so well with young voters

Dixon’s comeback try falls short

Apr 27, 2016

Despite her loss, former Mayor Sheila Dixon was feeling the love at her election night party. Her concession speech was interrupted several times by supporters shouting that they love her, and Dixon sent that message right back to them. 

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