Elections | WYPR

Elections

Election coverage from WYPR and NPR.

Chris Van Hollen’s victory party last night took on a festive glow long before positive results were more than just exit polls and wishful thinking. It might well be called a moment of affirmation after a bruising campaign. 

Pugh secures Democratic nod for mayor

Apr 27, 2016

State Senator Catherine Pugh claimed victory last night in a tightly contested Democratic mayoral primary that became tighter as the evening went on, then focused on unity and moving forward in her victory speech. 

Edwards goes down swinging

Apr 27, 2016

Congresswoman Donna Edwards fell short yesterday in her quest to become only the second black woman ever elected to the U.S. Senate. But she didn’t bow out of the race for the Democratic nomination before delivering a fiery speech that pointed out some uncomfortable truths to her fellow Maryland Democrats. 

donkeyhotey.com

Maryland's 2016 primary election is now history.  State Senator Catherine Pugh is a big step closer to her dream of becoming Charm City’s next Mayor, and Chris Van Hollen and Kathy Szeliga will go head-to-head to replace Barbara Mikulski in the U.S. Senate. Results are also in for a host of other city and state-wide races that were decided yesterday.  

What would a talk show be without a little post-primary prognostication?  We welcome back to the broadcast Jayne Miller, an award-winning investigative reporter for WBAL television, who has covered Charm City politics and a whole lot more for many years.

Complete coverage of yesterday’s primary continues today on WYPR on Midday with Sheilah Kast, and with reports from the WYPR news team this afternoon during All Things Considered   

Maryland Primary Results

Apr 26, 2016

STATE RACES:

President: Hillary Clinton (D); Donald Trump (R)
Senate: Chris Van Hollen (D); Kathy Szeliga (R)
Congressional District 4: Jamie Raskin (D); Dan Cox (R)
Congressional District 8: Anthony Brown (D); George McDermott (R) 

BALTIMORE RACES:

Baltimore Mayoral: Catherine Pugh (D); Alan Walden (R)
Baltimore City Council President: Jack Young (D) INCUMBENT; Shannon Wright (R)
Comptroller: Joan Pratt (D) INCUMBENT
District 1: Zeke Cohen (D); Matthew McDaniel (R)
District 2: Brandon Scott (D) INCUMBENT; Gregory Yarberough (R)
District 3: Ryan Dorsey (D)
District 4: Bill Henry (D) INCUMBENT; William Broaddus III (R)
District 5: Isaac Schleifer (D)
District 6: Sharon Middleton (D) INCUMBENT
District 7: Leon Pinkett III (D); Tamara Purnell (R)
District 8: Kristerfer Burnett (D); Joseph Brown Jr. (R)
District 9: John Bullock (D); Kenneth Earl Ebron Jr. (R)
District 10: Edward Reisinger (D) INCUMBENT; Christine Digman (R)
District 11: Eric Costello (D) INCUMBENT
District 12: Robert Stokes Sr. (D)
District 13: Shannon Sneed (D); George Johnson (R)
District 14: Mary Pat Clarke (D) INCUMBENT; Thomas Boyce (R)

*13 precincts have not yet reported

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton took definitive steps toward solidifying their respective party's presidential nomination on Tuesday, making their rivals' task to beat them nearly insurmountable.

Trump won all five of the delegate-rich GOP primaries in Connecticut, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Rhode Island. Clinton notched four victories in Maryland, Delaware, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, while Bernie Sanders won the Rhode Island Democratic primary.

Primary choices

Apr 26, 2016

Primary day in Maryland started with some fireworks when nearly fifteen hundred people showed up at Sandi’s Learning Center on Ellamont Avenue to work for mayoral candidate Catherine Pugh. They said they were promised paying jobs, but it all went south when campaign staffers said they didn’t need anyone else. 

Five delegate-rich states on the East Coast will vote Tuesday: Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Call it the "Acela Primary" for the train that runs through those states.

There's a lot at stake. Here are four things we're watching:

For Pugh, it's a race to primary day

Apr 25, 2016

With the primary election looming on Tuesday, this weekend was the start of a sprint to the finish line for state Senator Catherine Pugh in her bid to be the Democratic nominee for mayor.

“Welcome back.”

That’s what Theresa Jones said to Sheila Dixon, when she came across the former Mayor at the Unity Rally and March at Penn and North Sunday.

A non-grudge grudge match in the 13th

Apr 25, 2016

  Councilman Warren Branch barely held on to his seat representing the 13th district on the Baltimore City Council in 2011.  He won the Democratic primary that year by 43 votes. Shannon Sneed, who would later mount a write-in campaign in the general election, came that close to defeating the incumbent. And she’s back.

Tony Glover, who came in a distant third in the Democratic primary five years ago, is also running again, as is Ronald Owens-Bey, who ran as a Libertarian in 2011.

Record numbers turned out for primary early voting last week and now the campaigns shift to getting their voters to the polls on primary day.

Mayor’s Race: Where is Freddie Gray?

Apr 25, 2016

Baltimore is marking the death one year ago of Freddie Gray at the same time it’s choosing a mayor. But Gray, his death while in police custody and the riots that followed have not been center stage in the campaign.

    

Maryland’s primary election is less than week away. And while the presidential front runners were busy with Tuesday’s New York primary, Republican John Kasich delivered his relentlessly positive message to a sympathetic audience in Annapolis. WYPR’s Karen Hosler was there and joins Morning Edition host Nathan Sterner.

Lawrence Lanahan

Election day is less than a week away. Many candidates and their supporters are taking the gloves off and waging attacks against opponents in a last minute effort to sway voters. 

But what if the attacks aren't from real voters or candidates? After freelance reporter Lawrence Lanahan received a tweet from a suspicious account attacking State Senator Catherine Pugh, who is running for mayor, he decided to investigate. He found other suspicious Twitter accounts that seem to have been created with one purpose: to attack Pugh. 

Lawrence joins Tom to discuss the devious design of the social media campaign and who could be behind it -- and how unlikely it is that we'll know before Primary Election Day next Tuesday. 

Read Lawrence's piece here

Mayor’s Race: Minimum Wage? Not So Fast

Apr 20, 2016

All of the major Democratic candidates running for mayor say they support the idea of raising the minimum wage. But none of them fully support a proposal introduced this week in the City Council that would do just that.

Audits at the center of City Comptroller’s race

Apr 20, 2016

Joan Pratt, Baltimore City’s Comptroller since 1995, is facing her first challenger in 17 years. He’s Mike King, a Northeast Baltimore resident with a background in financial operations, and he says Pratt hasn’t done enough to audit city agencies.

donkeyhotey.com

More people have chosen to vote early in this primary election than ever before.  What does that tell us about what we might expect when the polls open on election day next Tuesday?  If the turnout in Baltimore is higher than in previous contests, who does that help, and who does it hurt?  How will the Presidential races affect the contests for the Senate, Congress, Mayor, and City Council?  And, with spending in the Mayor’s race and for one of the Congressional seats at an all-time high, how strongly will the winning candidates be positioned for the general election?  Our panel this morning is Luke Broadwater, City Hall reporter for the Baltimore Sun, Kimberly Moffit, associate professor of American Studies at UMBC, and Kenneth Burns, WYPR's metro reporter.  

Mosby out; backs Pugh

Apr 19, 2016

Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby announced Wednesday that he is no longer running for mayor and is throwing his support behind state Senator Catherine Pugh.

The announcement in front of City Hall came hours before early voting is to begin in the primary race that largely decides city races due to the overwhelming number of registered Democrats.

Costello challenged from south and west in 11th

Apr 13, 2016

  Baltimore City Councilman Eric Costello is running for his own term on the council and is facing a number of challengers.

He has represented the district since October 2014 when he was chosen to succeed Bill Cole, who was appointed head of the Baltimore Development Corporation by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.

embryforbaltimore.org, pughformayor.com, carlstokes2016.com

Tomorrow, as early voting begins in Maryland, state residents will begin casting their ballots for the national and local primaries. There are 13 candidates running for the Democratic nomination for Mayor of Baltimore. 

According to the most recent poll, released by The Baltimore Sun and the University of Baltimore, State Senator Catherine Pugh leads with 31 percent of likely voter support, followed by former mayor Shelia Dixon with 25 percent. Lawyer Elizabeth Embry is in third place with 9 percent support, up from 5 percent last month. Businessman David Warnock is in fourth place with 7 percent, and Councilman Carl Stokes and Councilman Nick Mosby are tied at fifth place in the poll, with 5 percent support.

Last week, Maryland Morning hosted a debate between Shelia Dixon, David Warnock and Nick Mosby. At the time, according to a March 10th poll, Warnock was in third place and Mosby was in fourth. Senator Pugh had been invited to  join that debate but she declined, citing obligations in the Senate. 

On Wednesday morning, after initially declining WYPR's invitation to participate in a second mayoral debate with candidates Elizabeth Embry and Carl Stokes, Senator Pugh arrived unexpectedly at the Maryland Morning studio a few minutes after the live program had begun.  She was invited to join the debate in progress, and spent the rest of the hour with candidates Embry and Stokes discussing the issues in the mayoral race with host Tom Hall. 

Sheila Dixon for Mayor, David Warnock, John Brecher

*On April 13th Nick  Mosby announced that he is suspending his campaign for mayor. Mosby has endorsed State Sen. Catherine Pugh. 

Beginning April 14th, Baltimore City residents will have the opportunity to cast their votes in the crowded 13-person race for the Democratic nomination for Mayor of Baltimore. 

There have been dozens of mayoral forums held throughout the city, many of which offered a platform to most, if not all, of the candidates. While it’s important to consider the views of everyone running, the sheer volume of people on stage has made it difficult for any candidate to explain their vision in a thoughtful and unhurried way.

Maryland Morning invited the top three Democratic candidates in the most recent poll to participate in a live in-studio debate. The poll, published in March, was commissioned by the Baltimore Sun and the University of Baltimore's College of Public Affairs and Schaefer Center for Public Policy and was conducted by Opinion Works.

According to the poll, State Senator Catherine Pugh leads with 26 percent of likely voter support, followed by former Mayor Sheila Dixon with 24 percent. Businessman David Warnock comes in third with 10 percent support. The top three are followed in the polls by Nick Mosby( 6 percent), Elizabeth Embry (5 percent) and Carl Stokes (3 percent).

Seven other candidates registered below 1% in the Sun/UB survey.

After originally agreeing to come, Senator Pugh canceled, citing obligations in the Senate. Sheila Dixon, David Warnock and Nick Mosby join Tom in-studio for an hour-long debate on the issues that seem to matter most to voters: crime, education, economic development and racial inequality.

Citizen Trueheart challenges President Young

Mar 30, 2016

Bernard “Jack” Young was made Baltimore City Council President by his colleagues in 2010 when then-President Stephanie Rawlings-Blake became the mayor.  Winning his own term in a landslide the following year, Young is running for re-election.

Amanda Wood / Flickr Creative Commons

Wednesdays are the day here at Maryland Morning that we concentrate, in particular, on politics. This morning we begin with a conversation about what the experience of voting will be like across Maryland when we enter the voting booth either as an early voter from April 14-21, or as a voter on Primary Election Day, April 26th.

Either way, we’ll be asked to choose delegates to the Democratic and Republican Presidential conventions, nominees from both parties for the US Senate and Congress, and here in Baltimore City, nominees for Mayor and the City Council. We'll also choose judges. If you've been paying attention, none of that will come as a surprise. But here's what you may not know: When you head into the voting booth this time, you'll notice big changes in the mechanics of voting. For one thing, we'll be using paper ballots, because of a 2007 decision by the Maryland legislature. 

Sorting Out Baltimore's Busy City Council Races

Mar 30, 2016
Wally Gobetz, Flickr Creative Commons

Have you looked over your sample ballot yet?  If you have, and you're a registered Democrat or Republican, you'll see you have a lot of choices to make in the upcoming primary election on April 26th.  Besides the Presidential, US Congressional and Senate races, 13 Democrats are on the ballot for Baltimore Mayor, a list that does not include incumbent Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake.  And for the City Council, nearly half of the seats are open, which is to say that the incumbent isn’t running for re-election.   Luke Broadwater covers City Hall for the Baltimore Sun.  P. Kenneth Burns is WYPR's political reporter.  They join Tom this morning to make some sense of some of the more than 100 candidates running for seats on the City Council.   

The Baltimore City Sitting Judges Campaign

Next month, Baltimore City voters will be asked to elect judges to the 8th Circuit Court. Of the eight candidates, six are sitting judges running in what’s known as a retention election. 

The sitting judges -- Shannon Avery, Michael DiPietro, Karen “Chaya” Friedman, Cynthia Jones, Audrey Carrión and Wanda Keyes Heard – were appointed by former Governors after being recommended by a non-partisan commission. The judges are campaigning as a block, although they will not be identified as “sitting judges” on the ballot. Last week, the two candidates not appointed by a governor, Todd Oppenheim and James Kraft, were on the program. Sitting Judges Shannon Avery and Cynthia Jones join Tom to discuss how they were appointed and why they deserve to keep their seats.  

We’re just five weeks away from the April 26th Maryland primary election.  In the last primary for Mayor, in 2011, voter turnout was among the lowest in history.  Does this portend a troubling trend?  Former Maryland Secretary of State John Willis, now a resident scholar at University of Baltimore's School of Public and International Affairs, studies the history of elections, and voter behaviors.  He's had a wealth of experience in the field.  As secretary of state from 1995 to 2003, he was involved at the state and national levels in election reform issues. He chaired Maryland's Special Committee on Voting Systems and Election Procedures, which led to landmark election reform legislation in 2001.   Sec. Willis also served on the commission which modernized and recodified Maryland's election laws. He joins Tom to discuss current trends in voting behavior, and what factors could affect voter turnout on April 26th.  

PRODonkeyHotey

The Maryland Congressional race is heating up. Congresswoman Donna Edwards (D-4th District) is giving up her seat to run for the Senate seat being vacated next year by retiring Senator Barbara Mikulski. Edwards’ district includes parts of Anne Arundel and Prince George’s County. Six Democrats are vying for the nomination in the 4th District to succeed Edwards. 

In the 8th district, Congressman Chris Van Hollen, who represents Montgomery County, is also relinquishing his House seat for a run at Senator Mikulski's soon-to-be-vacant office. Nine Democrats, including some well-funded political novices, have thrown their hats in the ring to be their party's nominee to fill Van Hollen's House seat.  

John Fritze, Washington correspondent for the Baltimore Sun and Todd Eberly, Chair & Professor of political science at St. Mary's College and proprietor of the FreeStater blog,  join Tom to discuss these and other significant congressional races.

City Council: A change is gonna come

Mar 18, 2016

One thing is for certain in the 2016 City Council election; there will be at least six new members after it’s all said and done.

The Turnaround Truck Turns Heads

Mar 18, 2016

  David Warnock’s truck is getting noticed on the streets of Baltimore.  And it’s not for its current top speed of 35 miles per hour.

Dubbed by its owner as the “Turnaround Truck,” the vehicle – featured prominently in Warnock’s television ads - has become a symbol of his campaign for Baltimore mayor.  He says it became a symbol by accident.

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