Elections | WYPR

Elections

Election coverage from WYPR and NPR.

President Obama is vouching for Hillary Clinton in his latest direct appeal to millennial voters.

Speaking to Now This News, Obama made his first public statements about the FBI's renewed focus on evidence possibly tied to Clinton's private State Department email server.

"I know her; I trust her," Obama said. "And you know, I wouldn't be supporting her if I didn't have absolute confidence in her integrity and her interest in making sure that young people have a better future."

When it comes to health care, the choice between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump comes down to whether to keep, or trash, the Affordable Care Act.

Trump says he wants to repeal and replace the health care law that is responsible for insuring about 20 million people, while Clinton has vowed to retain it and even expand its reach.

Here are the candidates' plans:


HILLARY CLINTON

  • Keep and build on Obamacare
  • Offer a tax credit of up to $5,000 to offset out-of-pocket costs over 5 percent of income

A week ago, Hillary Clinton was looking to run up the score against Donald Trump. Her campaign was running ads in Texas and planning a trip to the traditionally red state of Arizona.

Today, she heads out on that trip, but in a presidential election that has now seen a tightened race from where it was a week and a half ago.

Jonna McKone

Election Day is just a week away and WYPR reporters have been talking to voters around the state about the candidates for president for our series, Maryland Voices.

Theresa Thompson Flickr Creative Commons

Here’s a thought to ponder that some may find scary as we prepare to celebrate Halloween: The Baltimore City Council will surely be transformed after the election next week.

Six City Council incumbents decided not to run in the primary last April. Robert Curran, Rochelle “Rikki” Spector and Helen Holton are retiring for various reasons.  Nick Mosby and Carl Stokes chose to run for Mayor instead of for their council seats. James Kraft ran for Baltimore Circuit Court judge. Two other City Council incumbents, William “Pete” Welch in the 9th District and Warren Branch in the 13th, were unseated in the primary by fellow Democrats. That means that – no matter what happens on Election Day -- at least eight out of 14 seats on the council will be occupied by first time legislators.

What does that mean for the future of Charm City? Today, we bring you a Reporters’ Roundtable with three reporters who follow all things Baltimore very closely. Jayne Miller is an award winning investigative reporter for WBAL Television.  She is a "force of nature," according to the City Paper.  Luke Broadwater covers the city for the Baltimore Sun, and Kenneth Burns is the metro reporter covering Baltimore for WYPR. They joined host Tom Hall in the studio for a breakdown of the interesting council races across 14 Districts, and some prognostication as to how this large class of newbies will get along with veteran Council President Jack Young if he, too, wins reelection, which seems likely, and the rest of their Council colleagues.

Ruppersberger, McDonough campaigns

Delegate Pat McDonough, the Republican running for Congress in Maryland’s second district, is predicting massive voter fraud in the state. But Dutch Ruppersberger, the incumbent Democrat, vigorously challenged that allegation as both men appeared on WYPR’s Midday.

Rachel Baye

In addition to the candidates on the ballot this year, Maryland has one statewide ballot measure. A “yes” vote on the measure, Question 1, would change what happens when the state attorney general or comptroller leaves office between normal election cycles.

Why the 1st District council race is a real contest

Oct 27, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

Republicans believe they can achieve something for the first time since the 1940s; elect a member of their party to the Baltimore City Council.

It started when Republican Larry Hogan took the city’s first councilmanic district on the way to Government House (the governor’s residence) two years ago.  The GOP began thinking they might be able to break the Democrats’ stranglehold on City Hall.

The mayoral election hasn't happened yet, but Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about transitions from William Donald Schaefer to Kurt Schmoke all the way to...Catherine Pugh?

Dixon disses election results - again

Oct 25, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

Former Mayor Sheila Dixon insists she’s not a sore loser. But during an appearance on WYPR’s Midday Tuesday, she repeated her charge that questions still linger about the integrity of the results of the primary election she lost in April.

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