Elections | WYPR

Elections

Election coverage from WYPR and NPR.

On April 26, Baltimore city residents will vote to elect judges to the 8th Circuit Court. Of the eight candidates on the ballot, six are sitting judges -- appointed by a governor -- running in what is known as a retention election. The two remaining candidates, James Kraft and Todd Oppenheim were not appointed by a judge and are running independently.

Oppenheim has been a public defender in Baltimore for 11 years.  Kraft is a sitting city councilman in Baltimore’s 1st district; he’s been on the council since 2004. Both men join Tom in-studio to discuss why they’re running to be judges, despite not receiving a gubernatorial appointment.  

    

Fraser Smith and Karen Hosler, of the WYPR news team, talk about the tightening primary for the Democratic nomination to replace retiring Senator Barbara Mikulski and Rep. Donna Edwards' reputation for not playing well with others.

Arts in the mayor's race

Mar 14, 2016

The candidates to be Baltimore's next mayor laid out their plans to support the arts Monday night at a forum at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Event organizers said it was the first mayoral forum ever dedicated specifically to the arts.  WYPR's John Lee was there and joined Morning Edition host Nathan Sterner to talk about it.

Mayor’s race: MTA running late

Mar 14, 2016

  Marcie Roberts heard the disembodied voice--“Welcome aboard MTA”—one recent morning as she boarded a bus at Northern Parkway and York Road. She was in the middle of her daily 90-minute-two-bus commute from Windsor Mill to her job in Towson. The bus that got her to that point was the 44. She said it wasn’t so welcoming.

“Bus 44 is the worst bus I ever got on.”

Roberts said the bus is often late and doesn’t run at convenient times.

electcalvinyoung.com

Now, another in our series of interviews with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore, in which Maryland Morning host Tom Hall asks each candidate about their vision for the city.  

Tom's guest is Calvin Young, a 28-year-old engineer who lives in Hamilton, Maryland. He is a Harvard Business School graduate who has never held elective office.   He was the second candidate, after former Mayor Sheila Dixon, to file to run as a Democrat for mayor of Baltimore, officially launching his campaign in mid-August, 2015, before current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced she would not seek re-election.  Young is a Baltimore native who graduated from Poly and New York University, and is a former city youth commissioner.  He has also served as an aide in the White House National Economic Council, helping to develop economic and business development policy recommendations for the President. He spoke with Tom in studio on March 10, 2016. 

GLAAD

Today, we continue our series of conversations with candidates for Mayor of Baltimore.  DeRay McKesson is a native Baltimorean, and he’s worked as an administrator in the Baltimore City Public Schools.  He’s 30 years old, and for the past year or so he has been a full time activist, working in Ferguson, Baltimore and elsewhere on issues that include police misconduct and mass incarceration.  He has never held public office.  He’s on the ballot in the Democratic primary on April 26th , the last  candidate to file to run for the Baltimore mayor's office. Within days of his filing, Mckesson  released a comprehensive plan to address the city's most pressing issues, including proposals to expand educational programs and to begin major reforms of the Baltimore police department.  DeRay Mckesson joins Tom to share his vision for the City.

Breaking news in the police trials related to Freddie Gray’s death. We’ll start with an update from WYPR reporter Kenneth Burns. Then: the three men vying to be the Green Party nominee for mayor of Baltimore. The Green Party will hold its own primary just after the one in late April for Democrats and Republicans. Joshua Harris is an activist and organizer. Until recently he was running as a Democrat. Emanuel McCray is a community organizer and Army veteran; this is his second bid for mayor. And David Marriott, former police officer and Marine, is running for the first time. We’ll discuss housing, jobs, police reform, schools, and other issues.

The Democratic candidates to be Baltimore's next mayor outlined their plans to cut city property taxes at a forum in South Baltimore Thursday night. WYPR's John Lee joined Morning Edition Host Nathan Sterner Friday morning to talk about that.

  Little Eva’s 1962 hit Loco-motion set the tone for a Donna Edwards campaign rally in Baltimore’s Station North arts and entertainment district last weekend that was part sock hop, part prayer meeting. Campaign staffer Salima Siler Marriott told three dozen volunteers that it is “really critical at this juncture is that you are able to multiply yourself” to get out the Edwards vote.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

We’ll start this morning continuing our conversation about the ways that race is having an impact in this election cycle.  Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s victories in the Democratic primaries so far have included large majorities of African American voters, while Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders' wins or near-wins have been in states with a largely white electorate.  Last week, I spoke with the author and activist Steve Phillips, who contends that Democrats should concentrate their electoral efforts and resources to engaging people of color rather than chasing white swing voters.  Joining Tom in the studio to discuss the significance of the Black Vote is Dr. Kaye Wise Whitehead.  She is an Associate Professor of Communications at Loyola University Maryland and the author of several books, including Letters to My Black Sons.  

CindyWalshForMayor

Maryland Morning has been hosting a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  All told, there will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26 primary ballot,  along with five Republicans.  Three Green Party Candidates will compete in their own Green Party primary on May 1. One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot on Tuesday, November, 8.

State Senator Catherine Pugh, who is running to be Baltimore's next mayor, wants to return full control of its school system to the city. A bill she's sponsoring that would do that got a hearing Wednesday before a Senate committee.

Today, another in our series of weekly conversations with candidates who are on the ballot in the April 26 primary. We continue our focus this week on the race for the United States Senate. Congressman Chris Van Hollen has represented Maryland’s 8th congressional district since 2003. He is running in the Democratic primary to be the party's standard bearer in the November election to replace Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who is retiring early next year. Tom talks with Rep. Van Hollen about the issues that will face a new Senate and a new President in 2017, and about his vision for Maryland and the country.

Joining us to recap the results of last night’s Super Tuesday primaries and to look at what lies ahead in this very unusual political year is John Fritze, the Washington correspondent for the Baltimore Sun.  He joins Tom on the phone from his home in Montgomery County.

cupidformayor.com

 Today, we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have also registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party Candidates will compete in their own May 1st primary balloting.  One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot in November. 

Tom's guest is Gersham Cupid.  The Edgecomb neighborhood resident is a 10-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department, where he holds the rank of sergeant. He is a Democrat. He is 28 years old and married, with a child on the way. Cupid has never before held elective office, but as he explains to Tom, Baltimore is sorely in  need of new and more effective leadership, and his years of public service as a police officer have prepared him for the mayor's job. His top-priority issue for the city is public safety.

abetterbaltimore.org

Maryland Morning host Tom Hall has been conducting a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for mayor of Baltimore.  There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have also registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party candidates will be competing in a separate Green Party primary on May 1st. One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are Unaffiliated (with any party) will appear on the General Election ballot on November 8th. 

Continuing his conversations with mayoral candidates about their visions for Baltimore, Tom speaks with Democrat Patrick Gutierrez, a former Bank of America operations manager who has also worked with the non-profit Downtown Baltimore Family Alliance.   Married and the father of two young children, the 43-year-old Taylor Heights resident believes the most important issue facing Baltimore today is its lack of strong leadership, and the inefficiency and lack of accountability he says are rife in city agencies.

donnaedwards.house.gov

We've been spending the past several Wednesdays here on Maryland Morning talking to the Democratic candidates for mayor of Baltimore.  Today, we shift our focus to another important race that will be decided in the April 26th primary election.  The race for the United States Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Barbara Mikulski is almost as crowded with candidates as the race for mayor of Baltimore:  10 Democrats and 14 Republicans have thrown their hats in the ring.   We've invited the two leading Democratic candidates in the race to join us on Maryland Morning, this week and next.

Today, Tom's guest is Congresswoman Donna Edwards. She has represented Maryland's 4th Congressional District since 2008.  The Fort Washington resident currently serves on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, as well as the Science, Space and Technology Committee. 

Next week, Tom's guest will be Rep. Edwards' chief rival for the US Senate seat, Representative Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat who represents Maryland's 8th Congressional District.

Stokes: Riots ‘Should Have’ Happened

Feb 18, 2016

Baltimore Mayoral Candidate Carl Stokes said Wednesday that long term neglect of some city neighborhoods caused the riots that erupted last April after Freddie Gray’s funeral, “as it should have.”

carlstokes2016.com

Today, we continue our series of  Wednesday conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore, in which Maryland Morning host Tom Hall asks the candidates about their vision for the city.  

There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party candidates, 1 Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot in November. 

Tom's guest this week is Baltimore City Councilman Carl Stokes.  He is a Democrat.  He is 65 years old.  He lives in Greater Greenmount, and he’s the father of two daughters.  As a young man, Stokes first managed and then owned a chain of men's clothing stores, before turning to politics and winning election to the City Council in 1987.  He served for eight years, and when he left the Council in 1995, he was appointed to serve on the Baltimore City School Board.  He later worked as the vice president of a medical equipment and supplies company and was Chief Operating Officer of The Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy, a public-charter middle school for boys which he co-founded in 2006 in East Baltimore.  In 2010, when Stephanie Rawlings Blake became mayor following Sheila Dixon’s resignation, Jack Young’s councilman seat in District 12 opened up after Mr. Young was appointed city council president.  Carl Stokes was appointed to fill Mr. Young’s seat ; in 2011, he was elected to that seat on the council, where he currently serves District 12 as chair of the Taxation, Finance and Economic Development Committee.  He is giving up the seat to run for mayor, an office he first ran for in 1999 and again in 2011.

Mckesson Wants In To Prompt Change In Baltimore

Feb 16, 2016

Civil rights activist DeRay Mckesson said he waited for a candidate to jump into the Baltimore mayoral election with a plan and vision that he could support.  For him, none came.  So he decided to run for mayor himself; filing for his candidacy minutes before the deadline on Feb. 3.

“When I think about the traditional pathways to politics and the politicians that follow them; they haven’t led to the transformational outcomes that I think the city deserves,” he said Monday on WYPR’s Midday.

The Mayor's Race: Vox Populi

Feb 16, 2016

The candidates to be Baltimore’s next mayor are out there knocking on doors, making phone calls, attending forums and hearing from the voters. 

Pugh Touts Insider Status

Feb 16, 2016

Pundits have suggested the results of Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary are an indication of a national trend toward revolutionaries and insurgents. But at least one of the candidates to be Baltimore’s next mayor says the anti- insider movement won’t reach the local race.

In her campaign for the city’s top office, state Senator Catherine Pugh touts her years of public service, including stints on City Council and in the House of Delegates.

Warnock, Mosby Release Housing Plans

Feb 16, 2016

    

Mayoral candidates David Warnock and Councilman Nick Mosby released dueling housing plans Thursday they said they would pursue if elected to the city’s highest office.

Kenneth Burns / WYPR

A sea change is coming to the Baltimore City Council: Nearly half the members are not seeking reelection this year. Three of the 15 are retiring, two are vacating their seats to run for mayor, and another is pursuing a judgeship. Luke Broadwater of The Baltimore Sun and WYPR news analyst Fraser Smith join us to discuss the implications.

@davidwarnock

Today we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore. As of February 3rd, 12 Democrats, 4 Republicans, 1 Green Party candidate, 2 Independents, and 4 Unaffiliated candidates have registered with the Board of Elections to be on the April 26th mayoral primary ballot.  Their deadline to file is today. Each Wednesday for the next several weeks, we’ll take some time here on Maryland Morning to speak with candidates about their visions for the city.

David Warnock joins Tom in the studio this morning to make the case for what sets him apart in this year’s crowded race for Charm City’s top job. He’s 58 years old, a Democrat, and a successful businessman. He is the founder of a private equity firm and co-founder of the Green Street Academy, a charter school in West Baltimore. Warnock is also the chairman of a charitable foundation that has funded a variety of educational and community-focused organizations, including The Center for Urban Families

Sheila Dixon Campaign Website

Today we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore. As of January 20th, 8 Democrats, 2 Republicans, 1 Green Party candidate, 2 Independents, and 5 Unaffiliated candidates have registered with the Board of Elections to be on the April 26th mayoral primary ballot. At least 4 candidates have opened campaign headquarters and have been actively campaigning, but have yet to file with the Board of Elections. Their deadline to do so is two weeks from today, on February 3rd. Each Wednesday for the next several weeks, we’ll take some time here on Maryland Morning to speak with candidates about their visions for the city.

Tom's guest today is Sheila Dixon. She is a Democrat. She is 62 years old, and lives in Hunting Ridge on the city's west side. Ms. Dixon is currently working with the Maryland Minority Contractors Association. She was first elected to the City Council in 1987. She served as the Mayor of Baltimore from 2007-2010, until she resigned following a misdemeanor conviction for fraudulent misappropriation of gift cards given to her by some real estate developers.

Embry4Baltimore

Today, we begin a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  As of Monday (January 11th), 9 Democrats, 1 Republican, 1 Green Party Candidate, 1 Independent, and 3 Unaffiliated candidates have registered with the Board of Elections to be on the April 26 ballot.  Several candidates who have opened campaign headquarters and who have been actively campaigning have yet to file with the Board of Elections.  Their deadline to do so is three weeks from today, February 3rd. 

Each Wednesday for the next several weeks, we’ll take some time here on Maryland Morning to speak with candidates about their vision for the city.  Today, Tom's guest is Elizabeth Embry.  She is a lawyer.  She is 38 years old.  She lives in Waverly, and she has worked most recently as the chief of the criminal division in the Maryland Attorney General’s office.   She is a Democrat.  She announced her candidacy on November 6th.

To cast your ballot in the April 26th Maryland State & Baltimore mayoral primary elections, you must have registered to vote by April 5th.  For more information on the primary election and how to register,  click here

Democratic Congresswoman and Senatorial candidate Donna Edwards joins Midday to talk about her run to fill the seat that will be left vacant by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski’s retirement in 2017. We’ll talk gun control, equal pay, investment in STEM education, and her call for six debates with her rival, Rep. Chris Van Hollen.

The Unique Political Position Of Peter Franchot

Nov 14, 2014

Despite a strong Republican showing in last week's election, Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot easily won his bid to retain his seat. WYPR's Fraser Smith and Christopher Connelly talk about Franchot's unique place in the state Democratic party.

A coalition of civic groups launched today a long-term campaign to reform the way Maryland draws its congressional election districts. 

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