Elections | WYPR

Elections

Election coverage from WYPR and NPR.

Today, another in our series of weekly conversations with candidates who are on the ballot in the April 26 primary. We continue our focus this week on the race for the United States Senate. Congressman Chris Van Hollen has represented Maryland’s 8th congressional district since 2003. He is running in the Democratic primary to be the party's standard bearer in the November election to replace Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who is retiring early next year. Tom talks with Rep. Van Hollen about the issues that will face a new Senate and a new President in 2017, and about his vision for Maryland and the country.

Joining us to recap the results of last night’s Super Tuesday primaries and to look at what lies ahead in this very unusual political year is John Fritze, the Washington correspondent for the Baltimore Sun.  He joins Tom on the phone from his home in Montgomery County.

cupidformayor.com

 Today, we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have also registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party Candidates will compete in their own May 1st primary balloting.  One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot in November. 

Tom's guest is Gersham Cupid.  The Edgecomb neighborhood resident is a 10-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department, where he holds the rank of sergeant. He is a Democrat. He is 28 years old and married, with a child on the way. Cupid has never before held elective office, but as he explains to Tom, Baltimore is sorely in  need of new and more effective leadership, and his years of public service as a police officer have prepared him for the mayor's job. His top-priority issue for the city is public safety.

abetterbaltimore.org

Maryland Morning host Tom Hall has been conducting a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for mayor of Baltimore.  There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have also registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party candidates will be competing in a separate Green Party primary on May 1st. One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are Unaffiliated (with any party) will appear on the General Election ballot on November 8th. 

Continuing his conversations with mayoral candidates about their visions for Baltimore, Tom speaks with Democrat Patrick Gutierrez, a former Bank of America operations manager who has also worked with the non-profit Downtown Baltimore Family Alliance.   Married and the father of two young children, the 43-year-old Taylor Heights resident believes the most important issue facing Baltimore today is its lack of strong leadership, and the inefficiency and lack of accountability he says are rife in city agencies.

donnaedwards.house.gov

We've been spending the past several Wednesdays here on Maryland Morning talking to the Democratic candidates for mayor of Baltimore.  Today, we shift our focus to another important race that will be decided in the April 26th primary election.  The race for the United States Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Barbara Mikulski is almost as crowded with candidates as the race for mayor of Baltimore:  10 Democrats and 14 Republicans have thrown their hats in the ring.   We've invited the two leading Democratic candidates in the race to join us on Maryland Morning, this week and next.

Today, Tom's guest is Congresswoman Donna Edwards. She has represented Maryland's 4th Congressional District since 2008.  The Fort Washington resident currently serves on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, as well as the Science, Space and Technology Committee. 

Next week, Tom's guest will be Rep. Edwards' chief rival for the US Senate seat, Representative Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat who represents Maryland's 8th Congressional District.

Stokes: Riots ‘Should Have’ Happened

Feb 18, 2016

Baltimore Mayoral Candidate Carl Stokes said Wednesday that long term neglect of some city neighborhoods caused the riots that erupted last April after Freddie Gray’s funeral, “as it should have.”

carlstokes2016.com

Today, we continue our series of  Wednesday conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore, in which Maryland Morning host Tom Hall asks the candidates about their vision for the city.  

There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party candidates, 1 Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot in November. 

Tom's guest this week is Baltimore City Councilman Carl Stokes.  He is a Democrat.  He is 65 years old.  He lives in Greater Greenmount, and he’s the father of two daughters.  As a young man, Stokes first managed and then owned a chain of men's clothing stores, before turning to politics and winning election to the City Council in 1987.  He served for eight years, and when he left the Council in 1995, he was appointed to serve on the Baltimore City School Board.  He later worked as the vice president of a medical equipment and supplies company and was Chief Operating Officer of The Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy, a public-charter middle school for boys which he co-founded in 2006 in East Baltimore.  In 2010, when Stephanie Rawlings Blake became mayor following Sheila Dixon’s resignation, Jack Young’s councilman seat in District 12 opened up after Mr. Young was appointed city council president.  Carl Stokes was appointed to fill Mr. Young’s seat ; in 2011, he was elected to that seat on the council, where he currently serves District 12 as chair of the Taxation, Finance and Economic Development Committee.  He is giving up the seat to run for mayor, an office he first ran for in 1999 and again in 2011.

Mckesson Wants In To Prompt Change In Baltimore

Feb 16, 2016

Civil rights activist DeRay Mckesson said he waited for a candidate to jump into the Baltimore mayoral election with a plan and vision that he could support.  For him, none came.  So he decided to run for mayor himself; filing for his candidacy minutes before the deadline on Feb. 3.

“When I think about the traditional pathways to politics and the politicians that follow them; they haven’t led to the transformational outcomes that I think the city deserves,” he said Monday on WYPR’s Midday.

The Mayor's Race: Vox Populi

Feb 16, 2016

The candidates to be Baltimore’s next mayor are out there knocking on doors, making phone calls, attending forums and hearing from the voters. 

Pugh Touts Insider Status

Feb 16, 2016

Pundits have suggested the results of Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary are an indication of a national trend toward revolutionaries and insurgents. But at least one of the candidates to be Baltimore’s next mayor says the anti- insider movement won’t reach the local race.

In her campaign for the city’s top office, state Senator Catherine Pugh touts her years of public service, including stints on City Council and in the House of Delegates.

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