Freddie Gray | WYPR

Freddie Gray

WYPR, WEAA and NPR collection of stories around the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody.

Prosecutors are expected to call more witnesses Monday in their murder case against the police van driver in the death of a 25-year-old black man who died after his neck was broken in the back of the van.

Officer Caesar Goodson faces second-degree murder, manslaughter and other charges stemming from the death of Freddie Gray.

His trial began Thursday and the state has called 11 witnesses.

In the second day of a Baltimore police van driver's murder trial, prosecutors have called to the witness stand a doctor who did an autopsy on a man who died after his neck was broken in the back of the van.

Officer Caesar Goodson is charged with second-degree murder, manslaughter and other offenses stemming from Freddie Gray's death. Gray died April 19, a week after his spine was snapped in Goodson's van.

The state on Friday called its eighth witness, assistant medical examiner Carol Allan, who ruled Gray's death a homicide.

Prosecutors charged Thursday that Freddie Gray was injured because he got a “rough ride” on the way to the Western District police station at the hands of Officer Caesar Goodson.

Gray died from that injury – a broken neck – a week after his arrest in April 2015. Goodson is on trial in Gray’s death.

 

When the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six charged in the Freddie Gray case, begins Thursday morning at Courthouse East, prosecutors will be at a distinct disadvantage.

Circuit Judge Barry Williams ruled during pre-trial motions that prosecutors cannot mention a phone call between Officer William Porter and an investigator in the case in which Porter said he told Goodson that Gray “couldn’t breathe.”

The third trial related to the death of Freddie Gray begins Thursday, as police Officer Caesar Goodson — who faces the most serious charge in the case — heads to court in Baltimore.

Goodson drove the van in which Gray was transported after his arrest. Gray, a 25-year-old black man, suffered a fatal spine injury while in police custody — apparently while riding in the van, in shackles and not wearing a seat belt — and later died.

As the driver of the van, Goodson faces charges including second-degree depraved-heart murder in Gray's death on April 19, 2015.

The trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, the third of six Baltimore police officers charged in the death last year of Freddie Gray, begins Monday morning with motions hearings in Courthouse East. Goodson drove the van in which prosecutors say Gray suffered his fatal injuries. 

Graphic courtesy cnn.com

How will Monday's not-guilty verdict in the trial of Officer Edward Nero, combined with last year’s hung jury in the case of Officer William Porter, affect the State’s Attorney’s case against Ceasar Goodson, the police van driver whose trial is slated to begin early next month?   He’s the next Baltimore police officer to be tried in connection with Freddie Gray's death from injuries sustained while in police custody in April 2015. And what will be the impact of the newly-released Appeals Court ruling, which compels the indicted police officers to testify in each other’s trials? This morning, legal analysis from attorney Edward Smith and University of Baltimore law professor David Jaros, who join Tom in Studio A.

Nero Not Guilty

May 24, 2016

Baltimore Police Officer Edward Nero was acquitted Monday by Circuit Judge Barry Williams of all charges against him in the Freddie Gray case. 

Nero was indicted on second degree assault, reckless endangerment and two counts of misconduct relating to last year’s death of Freddie Gray from a broken neck suffered while in police custody.

Williams took about twenty minutes to explain his reasoning.

Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams is to issue Monday his verdict in the trial of police Officer Edward Nero.

Nero has been charged with second degree assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office in last year’s death of Freddie Gray.

Court is to begin at 10:30 a.m.

The Maryland Court of Appeals – the state’s highest court – released Friday its written opinion explaining why it ordered one police officer accused in last year’s death of Freddie Gray to testify against his five co-defendants.

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