Freddie Gray | WYPR

Freddie Gray

WYPR, WEAA and NPR collection of stories around the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody.

Prosecutors and defense attorneys presented their closing arguments Thursday before Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams.  And now Williams is examining the evidence and testimony presented at the trial of police Officer Edward Nero.

Baltimore police Officer Edward Nero has been found not guilty of all four misdemeanor charges he faced in connection with the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Gray died on April 19, 2015, after suffering injuries while in police custody.

Following the ruling, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement, "This is our American system of justice and police officers must be afforded the same justice system as every other citizen in the city, state, and country."

PKBurns-WYPR

On the morning of Monday, May 23rd, as Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams delivered his not-guilty verdicts in the trial of Police officer Edward Nero, WYPR was on the air live, providing forty minutes of special coverage anchored by Maryland Morning host Tom Hall. ​ He was joined on the phone from the Courthouse by WYPR reporters Kenny Burns and Jonna McKone. Providing legal analysis of the judge's verdicts were two of the city's top legal scholars: private attorney Edward Smith joined Tom in the studio, and University of Baltimore law professor David Jaros was on the line from the Courthouse.  Joining the conversation were Ray Kelly, leader of the No Boundaries Coalition, and Davon Love, with Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, both sharing their perspectives on how this ruling will be received across the city, and its implications for Baltimore's ongoing struggle to address issues of racial injustice and police misconduct. 

This is audio of WYPR's special live coverage from 10:38am to 11:18am on May 23, 2016.

    

Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams will hear closing arguments Thursday in the trial of police Officer Edward Nero who is facing second degree assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment for his alleged role in the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Nero defense rests

May 19, 2016

  A former training director for the Baltimore Police Department testified Wednesday there was “no possible way” an officer could safely buckle a suspect in the back of a police van.

Capt. Justin Reynolds, one of the last two defense witnesses in the trial of Officer Edward Nero, said an officer risked being assaulted if he tried.

Nero is one of six officers charged in the case of Freddie Gray, who died a week after his arrest in April 2015 from injuries suffered in the back of a police van.

The police sergeant who trained Officer Edward Nero in the field praised him Tuesday as the defense continued its case in Nero’s trial on charges stemming from the death last year of Freddie Gray in police custody.

  Officer Garret Miller testified yesterday that it was he who handcuffed Freddie Gray at the time of his arrest in April 2015, not Officer Edward Nero, and that he later placed leg restraints on Gray at the second stop of the police van taking Gray to the Western District station.

He also said he made the call for the wagon to meet them at the edge of Gilmore Homes to pick up Gray.

Prosecutors could call one, or even two, of police Officer Edward Nero’s colleagues to testify against him today as his trial on charges in the Freddie Gray case goes into a third day.

Prosecutors played the statement police Officer Edward Nero gave to investigators during the second day of Nero’s trial.  The state spent much of the day focused on what took place on April 12, 2015; the day of the arrest.

During opening statements, Chief Deputy State's Attorney Michael Schatzow told Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams that Officer Edward Nero disregarded his police training when he chased Freddie Gray and arrested him without probable cause, and was callously indifferent to the 25-year-old's wellbeing when he failed to secure him in a seatbelt.

Schatzow spent about 20 minutes laying out the state's argument.

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