Freddie Gray | WYPR

Freddie Gray

WYPR, WEAA and NPR collection of stories around the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody.

A second trial related to the death of Freddie Gray opens Thursday in Baltimore, where police Officer Edward Nero faces multiple misdemeanors in connection with the case.

Gray died April 19, 2015, after suffering a broken neck while in police custody — specifically, while being transported in a police van, medical examiners found. The following month, prosecutors announced charges against six police officers in connection with Gray's death.

Jonna McKone

There’s been a lot of attention focused on Baltimore’s youth in the year since Freddie Gray died. And much of that spotlight has been on Frederick Douglass High School. Images of dozens of Douglass students throwing rocks and bottles were captured on TV as protests turned violent the day of Gray’s funeral.  As part of our series, Baltimore: A Year after Freddie Gray, we look at how Douglass students are trying to take control of their own story.

Douglass students, their teachers and a group of reporters crammed into the school library on Wednesday to field questions about how the school has changed since Freddie Gray. Several students, two teachers, a school police officer and City Schools CEO Dr. Gregory Thornton, sat at the front of the room. Behind them were scrolling images of Baltimore residents photographed on city streets.  A scrum of cameras from local TV stations filmed from behind the audience. 

The first questions came from the students.

 

Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams ruled Wednesday that police Officer Garrett Miller must testify against Officer Edward Nero and Lt. Brian Rice.

Miller, Nero and Rice are charged along with three other officers in the death of Freddie Gray one year ago.

Rachel Baye

Mechanics were already busy at work at the Full Circle Service Center in Halethorpe when 30-year-old Brandon Carroll walked in. He said he was late because he had to meet with his parole officer.

"I was incarcerated for about six years,” he said. “I was hanging around the wrong people and basically was a product of my environment. I got caught with a gun, and that set me down for a little while.”

Being Nehemiah

Apr 20, 2016

In death, the name Freddie Gray became part of the national call for police reform. Quickly, though, the challenge widened. Every urban issue from unemployment, to education, to vacant houses, to public schools and the re-entry of ex-offenders was on the urgency agenda.  Gray grew up a victim or a product of them all. How urgent, though, would be question.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday that police Officer William Porter must testify against five fellow officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray.

Breaking news in the police trials related to Freddie Gray’s death. We’ll start with an update from WYPR reporter Kenneth Burns. Then: the three men vying to be the Green Party nominee for mayor of Baltimore. The Green Party will hold its own primary just after the one in late April for Democrats and Republicans. Joshua Harris is an activist and organizer. Until recently he was running as a Democrat. Emanuel McCray is a community organizer and Army veteran; this is his second bid for mayor. And David Marriott, former police officer and Marine, is running for the first time. We’ll discuss housing, jobs, police reform, schools, and other issues.

The Freddie Gray case moved to Annapolis Thursday as the Court of Appeals heard arguments on whether or not police Officer William Porter could be forced to testify against his five fellow officers.

All six are accused in Gray’s death last year from a broken neck suffered while in the back of a police wagon; they face charges ranging from reckless endangerment to second degree depraved heart murder.

Lawyers for the state and the six accused officers in Freddie Gray’s death will be arguing before the Court of Appeals Thursday morning at 10:00.  Click here to see the arguments in Annapolis as they happen.

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