Freddie Gray | WYPR

Freddie Gray

WYPR, WEAA and NPR collection of stories around the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody.

The Freddie Gray case lands in the Court of Appeals Thursday as prosecutors and defense lawyers argue whether Officer William Porter should, or should not, be forced to testify against his five co-defendants during their trials.

Prosecutors in the upcoming trial of police Officer Edward Nero are trying to keep the jury from hearing certain evidence.

Nero is one of six officers charged in the death last April of Freddie Gray.

The prosecutors have asked Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams to keep information about Gray’s criminal record, past hospitalizations, prior civil claims and lead paint exposure as a child from coming out at the trial.

The Court of Appeals – Maryland’s highest court – put the trials of five police officers charged in Freddie Gray’s death on hold Thursday to review decisions of Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams.

The Baltimore health system put Robert Peace back together after a car crash shattered his pelvis. Then it nearly killed him, he says.

A painful bone infection that developed after surgery and a lack of follow-up care landed him in the operating room five more times, kept him homebound for a year and left him with joint damage and a severe limp.

"It's really hard for me to trust what doctors say," Peace said, adding that there was little after-hospital care to try to control the infection. "They didn't do what they were supposed to do."

Two Baltimore police officers charged in the Freddie Gray case are opposing the state's motion to delay their trials until appellate courts decide whether another officer can be compelled to testify against them.

Elvert Barnes // Flickr Creative Commons

Now, an update on the continuing trials of the six Baltimore police officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray.  Two experts on the trials join Tom on the phone:  Justin Fenton is a reporter with the Baltimore Sun, and along with fellow Sun reporter Kevin Rector, he has been doing outstanding work covering the many twists and turns of the trials.  Edward Smith is an attorney in private practice here in Baltimore, and he has been one of Maryland Morning's invaluable go-to guys for legal analysis and commentary.

The Court of Special Appeals – Maryland’s second highest court – halted Monday morning the trial of police Officer Caesar Goodson; the second of six officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray.  Circuit Judge Barry Williams announced the order in court before jury selection was to begin in Goodson’s trial. 

The trial of police Officer Caesar Goodson begins Monday with a cloud of uncertainty around the prosecution’s star witness – fellow police Officer William Porter.

The Court of Special Appeals, Maryland’s second highest court, blocked Friday an order from Judge Barry Williams forcing Porter to testify in the upcoming trial to allow time for an appeal of the order to play out.

A Maryland appeals court has issued a temporary order that says a police officer doesn't have to testify against a colleague who is going on trial in the death of Freddie Gray.

The court says it issued a temporary decision because it wants to give prosecutors time to respond to whether Officer William Porter should be forced to testify at Officer Caesar Goodson's second-degree murder trial. Prosecutors want Porter to testify.

Digital Harbor HS

While a Baltimore jury deadlocked over the fate of Officer William Porter last week, teachers in city schools used the case to teach social studies lessons. Now that court officials have scheduled a new trial for Porter, one of six city police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray, city teachers will continue to use what happens inside the courtroom as a learning tool for their students.

City teachers and students braced for a verdict in Porter’s trial last week, but it ended Wednesday with a hung jury and a mistrial. On Friday, in Brianna Carter’s first period, 10th grade social studies class at Digital Harbor High School the trial provided a chance to talk about central themes in her class, like due process and the Constitution.

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