Maryland Humanities Council | WYPR

Maryland Humanities Council

Democracy Then & Now

Sep 1, 2016

As the upcoming general election approaches, we reflect upon the critical importance of political participation. “Democracy Then and Now: Citizenship and Public Education,” a Maryland Humanities-supported initiative at the University of Maryland, asks students, faculty, staff, and all Marylanders to consider how public higher education has contributed to the inclusion and exclusion of certain people in full citizenship, including voting rights. Kimberly Coles, associate professor of English at University of Maryland, tells us about a recent court case that sheds light on the role of public education in civic participation

History of Canton

Aug 25, 2016

Have you ever wondered how the neighborhood of Canton was given its name?The first ethnic Chinese to set foot in the U.S. right here in Baltimore’s Harbor in 1785 when John O’Donnell, an Irish merchant, landed his ship, the Pallas, in Baltimore Harbor in the newly independent United States on August 12, 1785. Dr. Evan Dawley an Assistant Professor of History at Goucher College tells us more about the world-traveler who gave name to an iconic East Baltimore neighborhood and the contribution his family made to establishing Baltimore as a leading hub for trade.

Intersection of Journalism and Life

Aug 18, 2016

Sometimes a journalist gravitates toward an issue without realizing why. Baltimore Sun enterprise editor Diana Sugg tells us about the moment she understood why she had been drawn to end-of-life stories, and how the knowledge she gathered from working on those stories impacted her personal life.

Evaluating the Arts and Humanities

Aug 11, 2016

While many of us know the value of the arts and humanities and the profound impact they have on our everyday lives, it is sometimes hard to evaluate that impact through traditional qualitative methods. Tahira Mahdi, a Ph.D. Candidate in Human Services Psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, shares her approach to assessing the impact of the arts and humanities.

Aging In Your Community

Aug 4, 2016

How does where we live affect our health as we grow older? Sarah Szanton, Associate Director for Policy at the Center on Innovative Care in Aging at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, tells us how we can help older adults maintain a sense of community as they age.

A Brief History of Black Feminism

Jul 28, 2016

Beyonce’s Lemonade has brought the black feminist movement into the national spotlight, bringing about many conversations and perspectives on the topic. Melissa Brown, a doctoral candidate in sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park, delves into the history and the pioneering women behind the movement.

Historic Ocean City

Jul 21, 2016

Many of us spend our summer vacation time at Ocean City – but do you know the history behind this scenic beach and boardwalk? Meagan Baco, communications director at Preservation Maryland, tells us how this go-to summer spot came to be, and how her organization works to preserve its history for generations to come.

Courtesy of Robert Breck Chapman Collection, University of Baltimore Langsdale Library Special Collections.

Some of the greatest gifts we pass down to future generations are our experiences, our stories, our histories. But how do you preserve and share a history that may have already been lost to time? Angela Koukoui, archival technician at the University of Baltimore, shares how she uncovered some of her own history in the library archives.

Reading Between the Lines

Jul 7, 2016

As adults, we know well the power of literacy – but how do we pass that along to our children in a way that encourages them to truly enjoy reading? Rona Sue London, children’s book curator at the Ivy Bookshop, tells us how she shares her love of reading with children.

Engaging in History Through Caricatures

Jun 30, 2016

Ever wanted to have a conversation with Ernest Hemingway?  Each July, Maryland Humanities’ living history series Chautauqua brings historical figures to life. For the past twenty years, artist Tom Chalkley has drawn caricatures of the featured historical figures for Chautauqua. Chalkley tells us what he has learned through that process.

The Humanities and Environmental Research

Jun 23, 2016

The Zika outbreak has many wondering how to control mosquito and other pest populations throughout the country. How might the humanities play a role in that? Dawn Biehler, author and associate professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Systems at University of Maryland, Baltimore County, shares the humanist approach to her research in Baltimore.

Environmental Humanities

Jun 16, 2016

Have you ever thought about the many connections between ourselves and our environment? At a recent Maryland Humanities discussion panel celebrating the centennial of the Pulitzer Prizes, panelist Mckay Jenkins introduced the idea of environmental humanities. Now he tells us a bit more about how he teaches that concept to his students at the University of Delaware, and how we can embrace it.

bLAM Collective

Jun 2, 2016

Ever wondered how local librarians, archivists, and museum curators learn and share information with each other? Started as a Twitter group, the Baltimore Libraries, Archives, and Museums Collective (bLAMcollective) brings these professionals together for networking, sharing of ideas, and professional development in the digital humanities. Jennifer Ferretti, librarian at the Maryland Institute College of Art’s Decker Library, tells us more.

Exploring the Past That Is All Around Us in Maryland

May 26, 2016

Do you love learning about local history, but don’t want to spend your summer cooped up in a library? Historian Mike Dixon tells us how we can discover and explore Maryland’s rich history simply by getting outside this summer.

Honoring Veterans Through Oral History

May 19, 2016

As Memorial Day approaches, we think about the best ways to honor our veterans. One of Maryland Humanities’ programs, an oral history project with Southern High School in Anne Arundel County, sought to do just that by connecting high school students with local Vietnam veterans in order to record and preserve their histories. Jennifer Davidson, social studies teacher at Southern High School and coordinator of this project, tells us more.

#ThisIsBaltimore

May 12, 2016

In response to the negative press coverage surrounding last year’s uprising, local nonprofit Wide Angle Youth Media was inspired to document and share positive images of Baltimore youth. The resulting compilation, made possible in part by Maryland Humanities, shares photographs and essays showcasing Baltimore youth from more than 15 neighborhoods. Today we hear from three Baltimore students who participated in creating and curating the book—Latrell, Raymond, and Imani— on how the experience affected them.

#BlackMinds Matter Baltimore Rising: Summoning the Village

May 5, 2016

Through its #BlackMindsMatter Baltimore Rising: Summoning the Village Call to Action series, sponsored in part by a grant from Maryland Humanities, the Black Mental Health Alliance for Education & Consultation, Inc. (BMHA) has created an innovative model of community engagement designed to infuse mental health strategies and solutions into the current and longstanding challenges facing Baltimore City. Jan Desper Peters, executive director at the BMHA, tells us more.

Connecting with Students Through Literature

Apr 21, 2016

Have you ever loved a book so much you wished you could write a letter to the author? That’s the foundation of our annual letter-writing contest for middle and high school students, Letters About Literature. A national Library of Congress program that is facilitated in Maryland by the Maryland Humanities Council, Letters About Literature promotes reading and writing skills and inspires creativity in its many participants.  Kimberly Dyar, teacher librarian at Rising Sun High School in Cecil County and recipient of last year’s Christine D. Sarbanes Teacher of the Year award, tells us how this program allowed her to connect with one of her students.

War Stories for National Healing

Apr 14, 2016

Most veterans return home with important and varied stories to tell— but do they have an outlet to express and share those stories? Through humanities-based programs like the Maryland Humanities Council’s veterans book discussions, or the Washington D.C.-based Veterans Writing Project, veterans are able to come together to give voice to their experiences. Writer Dario DiBattista, an instructor in the Veterans Writing Project, tells us more.

 

 

Impact of Maryland History Day

Apr 7, 2016

Did you know that each year the Maryland Humanities Council coordinates the National History Day competition in Maryland? Last year nearly 24,000 Maryland students engaged in this year-long historical research experience. Dylan Rogers Elliott, a former Maryland History Day participant and current student at University of Maryland, Baltimore County, tells us about how this program has made a lasting impact on his life.

Literary Walking Tour of Mount Vernon

Mar 31, 2016

Ever wanted to follow in the footsteps of the famous authors, poets, and editors who lived in Baltimore? Every third Saturday in April through October, the Maryland Humanities Council offers a Literary Walking Tour of Mount Vernon, taking you through majestic cultural institutions, past elegant mansions, and into the minds of Baltimore’s literary luminaries, artists, and journalists. On April 2, we’re kicking off the season with a special tour coinciding with Light City Baltimore. Jessica Baldwin, Program Assistant for Maryland Center for the Book, tells us more about the tour.

Diversity in Theater

Mar 24, 2016

On April 2, the University of Maryland’s School of Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies will hold its third annual Black Theatre Symposium, supported in part through a grant from the Maryland Humanities Council. Scot Reese, artist and professor at UMD’s School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies and one of the co-organizers of the symposium, tells us how this event aims to build diversity and community in theater.

 

Baltimore Stories

Mar 17, 2016

On March 23, the University of Maryland Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy, the Maryland Humanities Council, and other partners will kick off “Baltimore Stories,” a program designed to examine the roles of narrative in the life and identity of Baltimore, with a day-long public forum featuring David Simon and Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad. Sheri Parks, co-program director and associate dean at the College for Arts and Humanities at UMD, tells us more about Baltimore Stories.

The Impact of Pulitzer-Winning Journalism

Mar 10, 2016

Did you know that this year marks the centennial of the Pulitzer Prizes? In celebration of that milestone, the Maryland Humanities Council is offering a year-long series of events to highlight the impact this award-winning work has had on our lives. Made possible through a grant from the Federation of State Humanities Councils, the programming kicks off on March 8 with journalist panels at the Baltimore Sun. Diana Sugg, Pulitzer-Prize winning Sun journalist, shares the powerful impact that investigative journalism and the Pulitzer Prizes have on our world. 

All Baltimore Voices

Mar 3, 2016

After the death of Freddie Gray in police custody last April and the unrest that followed, the Maryland Humanities Council reflected on how the humanities could help. From this discussion came our Humanities Fund for Baltimore, a special grant program for local nonprofits. One of the program’s first round grantees, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, tells us about its funded project: “All Baltimore Voices: Stories About & Beyond the Unrest.”

 

Changing Baltimore

Feb 25, 2016

Through its Changing Baltimore series, sponsored in part by a grant from the Maryland Humanities Council, the Baltimore Museum of Industry is unearthing and sharing the history behind Baltimore’s ever-changing neighborhoods. The series uses lectures, films, and discussions in order to discover the past and present industrial landscape of our city. Anita Kassoff, executive director at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, tells us more.

Our Baltimore

Feb 18, 2016
Courtesy of Eubie Blake Cultural Center

On February 11, the Eubie Blake Cultural Center opens its “Our Baltimore” exhibit, which tells the stories of African Americans in Baltimore through the civil rights era to present day. The exhibit, supported in part by the Maryland Humanities Council, tells these stories by highlighting the work of the Phillips family, Baltimore-based photojournalists. Cheryl Goodman, program associate at Eubie Blake, tells us more. 

Sounding Botany Bay

Feb 11, 2016
Courtesy of UMBC

On February 16, the Dresher Center for the Humanities at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County will host a humanities forum discussing how humans have changed a unique Australian environment. Tim Nohe, Professor of Visual Arts and Director of the Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts at UMBC, spent nine years researching Australia’s Botany Bay. He tells us more about this experience and what he learned.

A Walk Through Shakespeare

Feb 4, 2016

Did you know that this year marks 400 years since William Shakespeare’s death? With support from the Maryland Humanities Council, local nonprofit Arts Every Day is commemorating this historic anniversary by partnering with Baltimore City Public School communities to engage students with Shakespeare, to understand the historical context through artifacts, and to engage in performing and visual art-making. Julia Di Bussolo, executive director of Arts Every Day, tells us more.

Finding and Cultivating Your Ideas

Jan 26, 2016

One of the most popular questions writers face from their curious audiences is “where do you get your ideas?” Elisabeth Dahl, a local author who writes fiction and nonfiction for children and adults, tackles that question as well as its natural follow-up: “how do you bring those ideas to life?”

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