Memorial Day Audio | WYPR

Memorial Day Audio

Monday is Memorial Day, when the nation remembers those who sacrificed their lives for the security of our country. In that spirit, we speak with Dario DiBattista, a writer, educator, and veteran-Marine who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. DiBattista describes his military experience and teaching writing to combat veterans as a form of post-trauma therapy. He says the stories of veterans are transformative not only for them … but for other Americans to understand what democracy costs. You can purchase Retire the Colors, an anthology of those stories, here.

"More than Words" Season 1 Podcast

May 25, 2017

First up-Deneira moderated a discussion with her co-reporters about adults’ perceptions of youth. The students had an honest and lively discussion about their experiences being stereotyped and how they feel adults could be more understanding and helpful to young people.

6:55-Xavier shares his connection to an issue all too common in Baltimore City--gun violence.

12:48-Chanel produced and narrated a radio diary about her identity as a gender non-conformist.  Chanel, who also goes by Cory, is committed to dispelling stereotypes about gender identity and expression.

23:40-Miles takes us on a journey through his experience of mentorship.

Photos- Allen by Stuart Hovell. Parnes by Chip Somodevilla

Yesterday, Emmanuel Macron trounced the populist far-right candidate, Marine Le Pen, to become France’s next President.  The election was a blowout, and the latest in a string of repudiations of anti-immigrant candidates in Europe. 

So why have voters in France, the Netherlands and Austria rejected populist candidates while voters in the United States embraced the xenophobia of Donald Trump?  The authors of a new book about the 2016 Presidential election argue that the answer is, in part, Hillary Clinton.  Few candidates in history had the kind of political pedigree that the former Secretary of State brought to the race, but she was unable to overcome chronic and implacable voter distrust. 

Jonathan Allen is the head of community and content for Sidewire, and a columnist for Roll Call.  He joins us from the studios of NPR in Washington, DC.

Amie Parnes is the senior White House correspondent for The Hill newspaper.  She connects with us from WBGO public radio in Newark, NJ.

The two reporters /co-authors join Tom for the hour to describe one of the most consequential cases of woulda, coulda and shoulda in U.S. political history.  Their new book is called Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign.  

"Precious" Hammond

In this Reveal/WYPR collaboration, we look at two cases of running from cops that reveal some truths about the intersection of policing and the courts.

Reporter Mary Rose Madden brings us the story of Jay Cook. He died in 2007 after a foot chase by Baltimore cops. When his parents asked why, they faced a wall of bureaucracy and evasion. 

Click here for a map showing the distance between the sites where Freddie Gray, Greg Butler and Jay Cook ran from police. 

Audio below. 

BPD

Tom's guest is Kevin Davis, the Police Commissioner of the City of Baltimore.  He oversees the eighth largest police department in the country, with an annual budget of $480 million; that’s almost 19% of the entire city budget.  The BPD is one of about 25 agencies around the country that were investigated by the Civil Rights Division of the Dept. of Justice during the Obama Administration.  Other jurisdictions included New Orleans, Cleveland, and Ferguson, MS.   

In August of 2016, the Justice Department issued a scathing report about the Baltimore Police Department that found a pattern and practice of unconstitutional stops and arrests that singled out African Americans, the use of excessive force, and other very serious allegations.  That report led to a consent decree that was agreed to on January 12th of this year, just 8 days before the Obama Administration handed power over to the Trump Administration.  

Creative Commons

The year is 1929. Baltimore is sharing in the good life of the Roaring Twenties, until October 29, when the stock market crashed and the lights went out. The day marked the beginning of a decade known as the Great Depression. Author Gil Sandler narrates a history he wrote of the Great Depression, as it was lived out in Baltimore.

They were years of sorrow for white and black, young and old, rich and poor. One out of four were out of a job and couldn’t find one.. Paychecks stopped, as did payments of rent and mortgages. Families were evicted from their homes. Money to buy groceries was scarce. Banks failed; some shut their doors forever, taking with them the life savings of depositors.

Though times were dark, people found ways to get through them. And survive them. 

Gil tells this history with small stories that made up the big story-- through to the end of the Depression era in the late 1930s.In the end, you will hear how the Great Depression of the 1930s has affected our lives profoundly—down to today.

Photo by Jillian Edelstein

Tom's guest today is the acclaimed Pakistani novelist and essayist Mohsin Hamid.  He’s the author of insightful and quirky novels like Moth Smoke, The Reluctant Fundamentalist and How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

In his latest work, Exit West, he explores the complexities and punishing challenges of being a refugee.  With hints of fantasy and a trenchant analysis of the human condition, Hamid writes fiction that forces us to listen and essays that compel us to question the common wisdom.

Mohsin Hamid joins Tom to talk about his work, and the uncertain fate of refugees in a world that is becoming increasingly hostile to those displaced by war, famine and political upheavals.

You can meet Mohsin Hamid on Saturday, March 11, at the Church of the Redeemer in North Baltimore.  The event will support the work of the Baltimore office of the International Rescue Committee.  It’s sponsored by the Ivy Bookshop, and it begins at 7:00pm.   For more information, click here.

Defining the Salad

Feb 19, 2017
Jeremy Keith/flickr

In this week's episode, Tony and Chef Wolf define what makes a salad, give a tutorial on how to make a basic vinaigrette and mayonnaise, and share what wines to pair with salad. And stay tuned for a Chef's salad challenge.

Johns Hopkins University

Every scientific advancement comes with a slew of questions. Take autonomous cars, for example.   In an accident, whose lives should a driverless vehicle be programmed to protect?   Passengers in the car, or people on the street? The field of bioethics addresses the complicated ethical dilemmas that researchers and policy makers face in an ever-changing modern world.

Today, Tom is joined by Dr. Jeffrey Kahn, the director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. He stops by Midday from time to time to talk about how ethicists help us frame the questions we need to ask when we are confronted with new research possibilities, or new advances in science and technology.

Joel McCord

A recent study from EPA’s Chesapeake Bay program has confirmed that the water quality in the nation’s largest estuary is improving, thanks to a pollution diet for states in the Bay’s watershed.

But there’s one part of one state—the five counties of South Central Pennsylvania—that lags behind in reaching its pollution reduction goals, mostly because of fertilizer that runs off farm fields into Bay tributaries.

John Lee

Oysters are nature’s filtration machines, and there used to be enough of them in the Chesapeake Bay to filter and clean all that water in three days. Now, there are so few oysters it takes more than a year.

So, environmentalists are trying to rebuild the population by growing oysters. And one of the so-called oyster gardens is in an unlikely place-- Baltimore’s polluted inner harbor. It’s part of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s Baltimore Initiative.

Without the she crab, there'd be no he crab

Oct 3, 2016
Pamela D'Angelo

The Atlantic blue crab, Chesapeake Bay’s signature crustacean, has been through tough times in the last 20 years. Some recent improvement has been credited to restrictions on harvesting females. Yet Virginia still allows the harvest of egg-bearing females, something Maryland banned back in 1917. The reasons why seem to be wrapped up in economics.

mikerowe.com

Ahead of his one man show Dirty Talk at the Modell Performing Arts Center, "dirtiest man on TV" Mike Rowe joins Midday host Tom Hall to talk about rolling up his sleeves and getting down to work in some of the hardest professions on Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs and later Somebody’s Gotta Do It which aired on CNN from 2014 until May 2016.

These days Mike has turned his focus to closing the skills gap by providing scholarships through the mikeroweWORKS Foundation for people who want to learn a skill or trade that is in high demand. Mike says the desire to start the foundation came from meeting thousands of skilled workers who make good livings and are passionate about their careers. Many of the folks he shadowed did not have advanced degrees, a point that isn’t missed on Mike. He says as a society we put too much emphasis on obtaining a four-year degree as the only path to success and not enough on obtaining a skill set in a specific vocation that could lead to a successful career. 

Joel McCord

A few years ago, scientists began worrying that blue catfish, the much larger cousins of those squirmy, yellowish bottom feeders, might take over in Chesapeake Bay. They’re big—better than 100 pounds in some cases--voracious eaters and they’re prolific. So, at least one seafood wholesaler appropriated a slogan applied to other invasive fish--eat ‘em to beat ‘em—and began aggressively marketing them. And local watermen have found a new market and seemingly endless supply. 

Summer Brunch

Aug 28, 2016
Stacy Spensley/Flickr Creative Commons

Tony and Chef Cindy talk about that moment in the weekend when you decide to take the rest of the day off . . . brunch!

Ice Cream

Aug 14, 2016

Tony and Chef Cindy help you get through the dog days of summer with a conversation about ice cream. They share their favorite flavors and some childhood memories of the delicious dessert. They also chat with Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams out of Columbus, Ohio, and David Alima of The Charmery right here in Baltimore - two ice cream makers with very creative takes on the frozen treat.

Seafood

Jun 26, 2016
Nick Richards/Flickr Creative Commons

Need some tips for dealing with seafood? Tony and Chef Cindy chat with Joe Lasprogata of Samuels and Son Seafood about the seafood industry and Joe shares some recommendations for great fish you may not have heard of. They dish out recipes and some wines to match.

Outside

Jun 19, 2016
John Tornow/Flickr Creative Commons

  Chef and Tony talk about entertaining outside.

 

Picnics

Jun 12, 2016
Rich Brooks/Flickr Creative Commons

  

  Tony and Chef Cindy discuss Picnics.