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Midday

Photo by Jim Preston

Theater critric J.Wynn Rousuck joins us in Studio A every Thursday with a review of one of the region's thespian offerings, and this week, she tells us about a new production of Origin of the Species now on stage at Strand Theater Company in Baltimore.

St. Martin's Press

In jurisdictions throughout Maryland, in New Jersey and in Virginia, and elsewhere yesterday, Democrats picked up wins in Mayor’s offices, Governor’s Mansions and State Houses. At the top of the Virginia ticket, Democratic Lt. Governor Ralph Northam walloped former RNC Chair Ed Gillespie by nine points, in a race that many around the country saw as a referendum on the Presidency of Donald Trump.

It was on this day, November 8th, one year ago, that Trump shocked the world when he completed his transition from campaign joke to President- elect. We are marking that anniversary today with a conversation with E.J. Dionne and Norman Ornstein, two of America’s most astute and respected political observers who are also the authors of a persuasive and insightful new book.

The book is called One Nation After Trump: A Guide for the Perplexed, the Disillusioned, the Desperate and the Not-Yet Deported. They wrote it with Thomas Mann of the University of California and the Brookings Institution.

E.J. Dionne is a senior fellow at Brookings, a syndicated columnist at The Washington Post and a visiting professor at Harvard University.

Norm Ornstein is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and a contributing columnist and editor at the Atlantic and the National Journal. They joined Tom from a studio at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass.

Centers for Disease Control

To date, more than 60 women have accused Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct. The accusations range from indecent exposure to rape. A new piece in the New Yorker written by Ronan Farrow alleges that Weinstein hired private investigators to collect information on his accusers and the journalists who tried to expose him in an effort to suppress stories about his predatory behavior.  

In the days after the New York Times published the initial story on Weinstein detailing a few of the allegations, more people came forward with sexual assault allegations against other powerful men in Hollywood including producer James Toback and actor Kevin Spacey. At least 60 women have accused Bill Cosby of sexual assault; a majority of those accusations came to light in 2014 and 2015. The trial in one of those cases ended in a mistrial earlier this year. 

photo by Kenneth K. Lam - Baltimore Sun

We begin with a look at the Baltimore Police Department's trial board hearing that's considering, in the first of three administrative proceedings, whether disciplinary action should be taken against Officer Cesar Goodson, Jr., one of six officers indicted in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray in 2015.  He drove the van that transported Mr. Gray.  Goodson was acquitted of the charges, including one for second-degree "depraved heart" murder, brought against him by State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby.  But last week and again today (Monday), he sat before a three-member panel engaged by the Police Department to determine whether or not his actions merit disciplinary action.

Of the six police officers originally charged in the Freddie Gray case, just three face trial board hearings: Goodson,  Lt. Brian Rice (tried and acquitted) and Sgt. Alicia White (charges dropped).  Trial boards for Rice and White are expected to begin, respectively, later this month and  sometime in December.  Officers Garrett Miller (charges dropped) and Edward Nero (tried and acquitted) chose to receive one-week suspensions rather than face the trial boards.  A sixth officer involved in the Freddie Gray case, William Porter (charges dropped), faces no discipline.

David Jaros is on the faculty of the University of Baltimore Law School.  Debbie Hines is an attorney in private practice in Washington.  They both paid very close attention to Officer Goodson’s criminal trial last year.  They join Tom in the studio to talk about what the trial board hearings say about the ability of the Baltimore Police department to police itself, and whether these disciplinary proceedings can restore community trust in the force.

Last week, CSX Transportation shocked the Hogan administration and local officials by withdrawing its support for an expansion of the Howard Street Tunnel. What does that decision mean for the city and for the Port of Baltimore? And, what does it mean for the current tunnel, which was built in the 1890s? It was the site of a large chemical fire after a 60 train-car pile-up, which did severe damage to underground infrastructure, 16 years ago.    

 Colin Campbell is a reporter for the Baltimore Sun who wrote about CSX's decision to tank the tunnel plans.  David Warnock is the co-founder of Camden Partners, a venture capital firm, and a former candidate for Mayor. They join Tom to talk about the Howard Street tunnel. 

Kamau High, managing editor of The Afro-American newspaper, joins Tom to talk about the local stories his newsroom is covering. There have been some changes in the leadership of the local chapter of the NAACP, and a racially-charged controversy erupted last week, when some students at local private schools dressed up as Freddie Gray for Halloween. 

Jim Lo Scalzo - Shutterstock

The Republicans have proposed a sweeping overhaul to the tax code. Some of the changes involve deductions that have been baked into the cake of the code for generations, and the impact on the deficit is huge.  The President called for the death penalty for the man accused of killing 8 and wounding 12 in New York.  An excerpt from former interim DNC chair Donna Brazile's book is complicating matters for the Democratic Party as they continue to strategize an opposition to the Trump Administration.

Eugene Scott reports on politics and identity for the Washington Post politics blog, The Fix. He joins Tom to discuss the news of the week. 

Aaron Nah/Bush Chicken

For this portion of the Newswrap, Tom focuses on several major news developments on the African continent. 

Contentious presidential elections in Liberia and Kenya have dominated recent headlines, as results in both contests have been tainted by allegations of fraud. As Liberia attempts its first nonviolent transition to power in over seven decades, its Supreme Court has been the linchpin to peace, amid accusations of bribery and intimidation. 

In Kenya, while the courts have tried to uphold the electoral process, they have not been able to avert bloodshed: nearly 30 people have died during election-related protests, ethnic violence, and clashes with police.  

Finally, an examination of the situations in Niger and the Sahel, where four Green Berets were killed during US military operations, ostensibly in support of local anti-terrorism forces.  

Emira Woods is an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, a progressive think tank that works on social and economic justice issues. She joins Tom for an update on Africa. 

Photo Courtesy Full Circle Dance Company

We're going to take a look now at how creative artists are addressing a very serious and longstanding problem.  Domestic violence affects nearly one in four women.  According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and The National Institute of Justice, 22% of women experience at least one physical assault by a partner during their adulthood.

The Full Circle Dance Company has drawn on the stories of women affected by domestic violence to inspire their latest collaboration: a benefit performance this weekend called "Unshamed: Baring Our Secrets and Our Souls."

Joining Tom in Studio A to talk about the benefit performance -- and the difficult issue it's addressing --  is Donna Jacobs, the Artistic Director of Full Circle Dance Company, who is also a Senior Vice President at the University of Maryland Medical System

Dr. Carnell Cooper joins Tom as well.  He is an associate professor of surgery and the director of the Center for Injury Prevention and Policy at the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

The Full Circle Dance Company performs "Unshamed: Baring Our Secrets and Our Souls" at the Chesapeake Arts Center in Brooklyn Park, Maryland. on Saturday, November 4 at 7:30pm, and on Sunday, November 5 at 2:30pm.  A portion of all ticket proceeds will be donated to the Bridge Domestic Violence Program at UMMS.   Click here for directions and ticket info. 

AM Joy

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation now includes two indictments and a guilty plea. Writing yesterday in Vanity Fair Magazine, Gabriel Sherman reports that Steve Bannon is now openly worried about Donald Trump being impeached or removed under the 25th amendment, and that Bannon fears a revolt by some members of the cabinet, and the Republican establishment.

All of this is, of course, music to the ears of the Progressive Left. But should impeachment efforts form the fundament of the Trump resistance movement? Progressives, and many conservatives, for that matter, agree that Trump is unfit to serve in the highest office in the land. But what else do they agree on? Is there consensus about health care, tax policy, or counter-terrorism? What do Democrats stand for besides standing against Trump?

Tom's guest today is Joy-Ann Reid,  host of AM Joy on MSNBC, where she is also a political analyst. She is the author of the book "Fracture: Barack Obama, The Clintons and the Racial Divide," which was published in 2015, with an update in the summer of 2016. She co-edited "We Are the Change We Seek: The Speeches of Barack Obama," with E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post. That book was published earlier this year.

Joy-Ann Reid speaks at Johns Hopkins University tonight at 8 pm. Her topic:  journalism in the age of fake news.  Click here for more information.

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