Justice Reinvestment

Oct 28, 2015
Still Burning / Creative Commons via Flickr

About three out of five people who enter prison in Maryland are sent there for non-violent crimes. But, over the past decade, Maryland has been sentencing even non-violent offenders to more time behind bars. A high-level panel of police chiefs, prison experts, judges, legislators, and others is looking at facts like these to figure out whether Maryland can reduce sentences and do a better job of rehabilitating inmates and supervising them when they get out -- in other words, spending less money, or spending it more wisely, without reducing public safety.

Apprenticeships and Baltimore City Contracts

Oct 27, 2015

On Midday Tuesday, we’ll talk about apprenticeships. They can be a path to upward mobility – young people learn skills and get connected to a job without taking on college debt. But the U.S. has not seen the surge in apprenticeships that have shaped England’s labor force in the last 15 years. Why not? We’ll talk to Del. Cory McCray, D-Baltimore, who apprenticed to become an electrician, and to Tom Bewick, who designed the U.K.’s apprentice system.

Rueters via IBtimes.com

  It’s been six months since the riot in Baltimore beginning in the late afternoon of April 27th, following the funeral of 25 year-old Freddie Gray. The actions from that night affected as many as 400 Baltimore City businesses. While the unrest was short lived, its impacts are still evident for businesses in places like Mondawmin Mall and Fells Point. Today on Midday, we’ll talk to two reporters who wrote about Baltimore's recovery: Sheryl Gay Stolberg of the New York Times and Colin Campbell of the Baltimore Sun; and Lance Lucas, the President of the Greater Baltimore Black Chamber of Commerce to determine the extent of the damage to the city’s businesses and reputation.


Maryland high schools are about to get their first look at results from the PARCC exam – a relatively new standardized test of complex skills. We ask interim state superintendent of schools Jack Smith how the scores will be used. Plus: headlines from the Baltimore Business Journal with Sarah Gantz; Jed Dietz of the Maryland Film Festival on the Parkway Theater’s 100th birthday celebration and local brewer Jon Zerivitz on Baltimore’s craft brewing scene.



 From in-home daycare and child care centers to nannies and babysitters, parents often see their budgets strained by the high cost of child care. While the US Department of Health and Human Services recommends that families spend no more than 10 percent, a recent study by the nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank, the Economic Policy Institute, found that very few people live in areas where child care costs are at all close to that threshold. In this hour of Midday, EPI's Elise Gould and Maryland Family Network's Margaret Williams join Sheilah to discuss the financial burden placed on American families with young children.

October is breast cancer awareness month, so we want to spend this hour discussing detection, treatment and prevention. We’ll meet Leslie Ries, who learned after her surgery that her family had a history of breast cancer, and talk to her and her daughter about decisions they face. And we’ll learn about this weekend’s Komen Race for the Cure from someone who’s helping organize it. 

Also joining us is Dr. Vered Stearns. She’s co-director of the Johns Hopkins Breast Cancer Program, and holds the Breast Cancer Research Chair in Oncology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

emPower Magazine

The Mental Health Association of Maryland is marking its 100th birthday with a national conference on research and cutting-edge technologies aimed at strengthening your brain. What’s new in what we understand about how the brain works? What needs to be done to put new tools in the hands of professionals AND consumers? Psychiatrist Henry Harbin, past director of Maryland’s state mental-health authority, gives us an overview of the some of the pressing issues in mental health. We also speak to Dr. Michael Knabel about reviewing mental health software. Are customers getting what they pay for? Who’s watching out for patient safety? And neurologist Jay Lombard talks about tests that could lead to better choices of medications for treatment of mental illness.

Midday Friday

Oct 16, 2015
Stephen Melkisethian / Flickr via Creative Commons

  Former NAACP President Ben Jealous today put out a six-point plan to improve police-community relations in Baltimore. Luke Broadwater of the Baltimore Sun tells us more. We’ll also hear from two protesters who were arrested for occupying City Hall this week -- Tre Murphy of Baltimore BLOC and the Baltimore Algebra Project and Makayla Gilliam-Price of City BLOC. Plus, news headlines from Jonathan Munshaw of the Baltimore Business Journal, and Lawrence Brown, assistant professor at Morgan State University, provides some historical perspective on why zoning is a public health issue. And this weekend is the Baltimore Running Festival. We speak to Lee DiPietro, who ran the Baltimore marathon 8 times and came in second twice. She tells us how her love of running gave her strength during difficult times.

Federal prisons are about to release 6,000 inmates ahead of schedule and  about 140 of them will return to Maryland. We’ll learn what it means for those ex-felons, and for the criminal-justice system. Our guests: James Wyda, Maryland's Federal Public Defender; Steve Cook, President of the National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys; and Jim Sents, Vice-President of the Vice President of Corrections, Veterans and Housing Services For Volunteers for America.

Democratic Debate Debrief

Oct 14, 2015

  We're analyzing the first debate among Democratic presidential hopefuls – former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, former Virginia Governor Jim Webb, and. Our guests: Political commentator Barry Rascovar of the blog PoliticalMaryland.com and Matthew Crenson, professor emeritus of political science at Johns Hopkins University. Join us for the conversation by sending an email to Midday@wypr.org or calling 410-662-8780.