Midday

Is The G.O.P. Too Polarized To Function?

Nov 25, 2015

  From filibusters and threats to shut down the government, to outsider presidential candidates and vows to keep out Syrian refugees, the Republican party is in a peculiar and "unprecedented" place. Is the G.O.P. too polarized to function?

In this hour of Midday, we take a  historical look at political insurgencies from the past: from the democratic Watergate Babies in the seventies, to the Tea Party and Freedom Caucus of today. Our guests: Barry Rascovar from the Maryland Reporter; Laura Blessing, the Senior Fellow Government Affairs Institute at Georgetown University and Geoffrey Kabaservice, author of ‘Rule and Ruin: The Downfall of Moderation and the Destruction of the Republican Party, From Eisenhower to the Tea Party.'

  Today we’ll dive deeper into Baltimore’s Vacants to Value effort. A recent report from the nonprofit Abell Foundation concluded that the successes of the Vacants to Value program had been overstated by about 40 percent. Two deputy city housing commissioners are here to respond to the report. Who decides whether a vacant should be demolished or rehabbed? What influence can the neighborhood have? 

In 2010 Baltimore unveiled Vacants to Value, an effort to rehab abandoned properties and eliminate blight across the city. But, while officials have boasted that more than 1,500 houses have been renovated and occupied through the program, a recent investigation found that the real number is closer to just 900 homes.

European Commission DG ECHO / Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, along with governors in more than half of US states, is asking for the resettlement of Syrian refugees to cease until the federal government addresses concerns about potential terrorist threats. We discuss the screening process for refugees with Ruben Chandrasekar, the executive director of Baltimore's arm of the International Rescue Committee.

Student Activism, Race & Free Speech

Nov 18, 2015
Nick Schnelle/Columbia Daily Tribune via AP

The University of Missouri, Yale University, University of South Carolina, Occidental College, University of Kansas, Claremont McKenna College. The list goes on. College students across the country are leading protests and demonstrations to call attention to the issue of racial tolerance, diversity, and in some cases, the resignation of professors and high-ranking administrators. In this hour of Midday we'll view this topic through national and local lenses, and hear the points of view of academic reporters, students, a college administrator and a free speech advocate. 

Our guests: Scott Jaschik,editor and one of the founders of Inside Higher Ed; Julia Joseph, a sophomore and student journalist at Loyola University; Lisa Gray, assistant director of Student Life for Cultural and Spiritual Diversity at UMBC; Tyana Warren, a junior at Johns Hopkins University; and Robert Shibley, the executive director of Foundation of Individual Rights in Education. 

A 79-page analysis of the performance of the Baltimore Police Department during April's unrest was released yesterday. the report was compiled by a Washington, DC-based law enforcement think take. The report is available here.

In this hour, a look at the report's findings and recommendations. Plus, how does the BPD's handling of protests and rioting compare to other that of cities?

Can being black be bad for your health? In his memoir "Black Man in a White Coat," Maryland native Dr. Damon Tweedy reveals - through personal reflections and hard statistics - the disparities between blacks and whites in the world of medicine.

Tom Carmony / Flickr via Creative Commons

From in-home daycare and child care centers to nannies and babysitters, parents often see their budgets strained by the high cost of child care. While the US Department of Health and Human Services recommends that families spend no more than 10 percent, a recent study by the nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank, the Economic Policy Institute, found that very few people live in areas where child care costs are at all close to that threshold.

What impact does your childhood have on your health as an adult? For those who experienced abuse or neglect, trauma can push their brain’s fight-or-flight response into overdrive, leading to both mental and physical illnesses in adulthood. In Donna Jackson Nakazawa's new book, "Childhood Disrupted," she breaks down the research on "adverse childhood experiences" and their effect on health outcomes.

Erning Zhang / Creative Commons via Flickr

On this Veteran's Day Sheilah Kast speaks to Lieutenant Kawika Segundo, a Purple Heart recipient and bone marrow donor. We'll hear about his donation experience and find out why the matching process is so difficult for some patients. If you would like to become a donor, information from the National Marrow Donor Program is available here.

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