More than Words | WYPR

More than Words

We've compiled all 7 episodes of More than Words, a series reported and produced by students at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. Click on the image for information about each episode. 

For our final More Than Words story, Xavier started out interested in how activists in Baltimore see their work in the city as connected to and inspired by Civil Rights struggles of the past. As he researched and conducted interviews for this piece, he found writing to be an overlooked form of activism and decided to sit down with one of his favorite authors, D. Watkins.

Jonna McKone

For our final More Than Words story, Xavier started out interested in how activists in Baltimore see their work in the city as connected to and inspired by Civil Rights struggles of the past. As he researched and conducted interviews for this piece, he found writing to be an overlooked form of activism and decided to sit down with one of his favorite authors, D. Watkins.

Louis Umerlik

Last week you heard from Deneira, a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. She shared a little bit about her life with her mom and grandmother. Now she’ll give us some insight into her senior year. Deneira says she’s “not the normal teenager.” Who knows if such a thing exists, but those familiar with Deneira will tell you that she is an intelligent, resilient and unique young adult. In her last piece for More than Words, you’ll hear some phone conversations Deneira had with her sister about how they cope with anxiety and depression. More Than Words is supported by a generous grant from the Philip and Beryl Sachs Family Foundation.

Last week you heard from Deneira, a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. She shared a little bit about her life with her mom and grandmother. Now she’ll give us some insight into her senior year. A month or so ago, Deneira told me she’s “not the normal teenager.” Who knows if such a thing exists, but those familiar with Deneira will tell you that she is an intelligent, resilient and unique young adult.  

In her last piece for More than Words, you’ll hear some phone conversations she had with her sister about how they cope with anxiety and depression. 

More Than Words is supported by a generous grant from the Philip and Beryl Sachs Family Foundation.

Louis Umerlik

In today's episode of More than Words, we’ll focus on women who sacrifice and provide for their families. Deneira is a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She walked across the stage last week. She lives with her mom, grandma and several pets.

In today's episode of More than Words, we’ll focus on women who sacrifice and provide for their families. Deneira is a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She walked across the stage last week. She lives with her mom, grandma and several pets. 

These three generations of women have faced many struggles, some of which are ongoing. Deneira will tell you about some of her challenges next week, but first she wanted to share a piece about the women in her life who exemplify perseverance and strength. 

More Than Words is supported by a generous grant from the Philip and Beryl Sachs Family Foundation.

First up-Deneira moderated a discussion with her co-reporters about adults’ perceptions of youth. The students had an honest and lively discussion about their experiences being stereotyped and how they feel adults could be more understanding and helpful to young people.

6:55-Xavier shares his connection to an issue all too common in Baltimore City--gun violence.

12:48-Chanel produced and narrated a radio diary about her identity as a gender non-conformist.  Chanel, who also goes by Cory, is committed to dispelling stereotypes about gender identity and expression.

23:40-Miles takes us on a journey through his experience of mentorship.

Frederick Douglass High School student, Miles, takes us on a journey through his experience of mentorship.

  

In today’s episode Chanel, a Frederick Douglass High School student, produced and narrated a radio diary about her identity as a gender non-conformist. Chanel, who also goes by Cory, is committed to dispelling stereotypes about gender identity and expression.

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