parenting

Lucélia Ribeiro / Flickr via Creative Commons

 

Kik. Whisper. Yik Yak. Social media apps like these help teens and tweens connect in a digital world. Social media can broaden horizons, and help young people develop social skills. But the Internet has a darker side, especially for kids. The anonymity of the online experience allows easy access for sexual predators and cyberbullies. Plus, a frivolous social media post can live online … and damage future job and college prospects. How can parents stay informed about an ever-changing Internet landscape? How can they help their kids safely navigate that landscape? Adam Rosenberg and Drew Fidler of the Baltimore Child Abuse Center discuss the perils of the Internet for teens and tweens, and share tips for parents.

Maryland Family Network

Strengthening Families is an approach to promoting healthy family functioning. Taken together, protective and promotive factors increase the probability of positive, adaptive and healthy outcomes, even in the face of risk and adversity.

The Protective Factors Framework (Center for the Study of Social Policy) provides an overview of the five Protective Factors listed above.

Maryland Family Network

From birth, children are intensely engaged in learning how to learn. They are propelled by motivation, attitudes, and habits that experts call "approaches to learning."

Child Development Tracker from PBS Parents provides age-specific suggestions for nurturing your child’s curiosity, persistence, problem solving, and imagination.  Select your child’s age and then click on “Approaches to Learning.”

Maryland Family Network

  November 6, 2013

Preschool plays an important role in preparing children to succeed in kindergarten.  Publicly funded pre-K helps ensure that children of all income levels have access to preschool.

For more on this topic and others, visit marylandfamilynetwork.org

Maryland Family Network

November 13, 2013

From birth to age five, children experience a surge in brain growth and cognitive ability that sets the framework for all future development.

For more information, visit marylandfamilynetwork.org

Maryland Family Network

 

 November 27, 2013

You often hear it said that “Children are resilient” – but perhaps not as resilient as we’d like to believe.  There is staggering evidence that trauma in childhood has lasting effects and directly contributes to health, social, and economic outcomes in adulthood.