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On the Record

Stories from The Stoop: Michael Singleton

Apr 28, 2017

Michael Singleton tells a tale about how his relationship with cooking defined his relationship to what he can call home. It was at a special Baltimore Museum of Art Stoop Storytelling in November 2015. 

Farmers Markets Celebrate Summer

Apr 28, 2017

There’s something that just shouts summer when the smells and colors of a farmer’s market envelope your senses on an early Saturday or Sunday morning as you wander through the just picked vegetables, fragrant flowers and fresh baked goods that fill the aisles. We look at two markets in Baltimore that have truly stood the test of time.

Lawyers in the Library

Apr 27, 2017
Maryland Legal Aid

Lawyers in the Library, a partnership between Maryland Legal Aid and the Enoch Pratt Free Library, grew out of the unrest in Baltimore City after Freddie Gray died from injuries received in police custody. ‘Lawyers in the Library’ gives convenient access to free legal advice right in the neighborhood.  Amy Petkovsek directs the Community Lawyering Initiative at Maryland Legal Aid and her client Shannon Powell, along with Melanie Townsend Diggs, manager of the Pennsylvania Avenue Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, talk about the genesis of the free legal assistance program and the difference its made it more than one thousand people's lives. To volunteer or find more information about Lawyers in the Library, visit Maryland Legal Aid or visit Enoch Pratt Free Library calendar.

Benjamin A. Skolnik and Elizabeth Pruitt / University of Maryland Hornbake Library

It was at the Wye Plantation near Easton that the boy Frederick Douglass first realized he was not free. University of Maryland archaeologists have meticulously pieced together clues about the daily lives of the African Americans owned by the Lloyd family -- the garden they designed, the kitchen crops they grew, the foods they cooked and their religious symbols reflecting African spirituality as well as Christianity. Professor Mark Leone gives us a tour of the exhibit “Frederick Douglass & Wye House: Archaeology and African-American Culture in Maryland.”

WYPR

The recent General Assembly session made significant changes in state law about sexual assault, and held back from some other changes. Lawmakers said the state no longer has to prove force in order to prosecute a rape charge; the legislature also gave survivors of child sex abuse more time to sue in court. They did not approve a measure that would have allowed courts, when a child is conceived through rape, to terminate the parental rights of rapists.

Baltimore Speakers Series website

The Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University wraps up its current season with an evening that delves into where America stands today on issues of race and reconciliation. Speaker Michele Norris, former host of NPR's All Things Considered and founder of The Race Card Project, offers a preview of Tuesday's discussion that she'll have with fellow speakers Jason Riley, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a columnist for the Wall Street Journal and Morris Dees, founder the Southern Poverty Law Center. You learn more about Michele Norris’s Race Card Project here and find information about the last evening of the 2016-2017 Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University here

How does the Baltimore Improv Group, starting with the barest suggestions from the audience about characters and emotions, create a full-length improvised play? Dave LaSalle, one of the directors, and Tim German, one of the improvisers, take us inside the theatrical magic that ends up as Unscripted. Lights! Action? Cue -- who??

Stories from the Stoop: Fabiola Ramirez

Apr 21, 2017

Time now for a Stoop story. This week we hear an immigrant family’s tale of courage, strength and perseverance. Here’s Fabiola Ramirez, sharing her family’s story of coming to the US and thriving against all odds.

Reporting Child Abuse

Apr 21, 2017
Baltimore Child Abuse Facebook page

When kids are the victims of child abuse, they often don’t realize it--they need adults to speak for them. We ask the head of the Baltimore Child Abuse Center, Adam Rosenberg, about who has a responsibility to report child abuse, how to do it, and what resources are available for victims.

Science Not Silence

Apr 20, 2017
March for Science Facebook page

Thousands of scientists and supporters of science are painting protest signs, filling their water bottles and laying out their walking shoes for the first-ever March for Science in Washington on April 22, 2017. Scores of events are planned in other cities too. Some scientists are boycotting, fearful the march will tarnish the credibility of science. But Marnie Halpern, on the faculty of the Carnegie Institution for Science, plans to take part with a busload of colleagues. She says it's less about protesting policies of the Trump administration than about normally reticent scientists shining a light on their research.

Get Out for Earth Day 2017

Apr 19, 2017
barnyz / Flickr via Creative Commons

Three days before Earth Day 2017 we look at several efforts to build momentum for a healthy environment. Up first, Carl Simon, interim director of the environmental watchdog group “Blue Water Baltimore,” tells us about a host of activities for Earth Day, from down-and-dirty trash removal to fledgling trees and flowers for planting. 

frankieleon/Flickr via Creative Commons

Every day doctors write more than 650,000 opioid prescriptions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In some of those cases, addiction follows. As a result, deaths from prescription opioids have more than quadrupled since 1999. Travis Rieder is a bioethicist at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, and he personally experienced a dependence on opioids. He wrote about it in the January issue of the journal “Health Affairs,” and a portion of that article was excerpted in the Washington Post. Original air date: January 24, 2017.

Imagine being a teenager faced with a devastating choice - either be drafted into the army of the country trying to gain control of your home or flee. For Dawit Gebremichael Habte, the only choice was to escape. Eventually, he resettled in the Maryland and focused his efforts on his education - attending Johns Hopkins University - with the goal of returning to help those he left behind. He shares his story in the new memoir, Gratitude in Low Voices.

Time now for another Stoop story, this time from Jim Karantonis, a psychiatric technician stationed at an army hospital during the Vietnam War. He describes an unusual game of baseball. 

Baltimore Heritage

Lions, demons, and devilish fiends--all can be spotted on Baltimore Heritage's gargoyle-themed walking tour of Downtown Baltimore. We hear from Executive Director Johns Hopkins about the nonprofit’s offerings, from tours of LGBT history sites in Mt. Vernon to a biking tour of delis and bakeries in East Baltimore--no spandex allowed! For more information about tours, click here. To suggest a tour, click here to contact Baltimore Heritage.

Our criminal justice system is the largest and most expensive in the world. Critics have zeroed in on the disproportionate impact of mass incarceration on African-Americans. But many African-Americans supported the war on crime that began in the 1970s. Why? We speak to Yale law professor James Forman Jr., about his book “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America”.

Johns Hopkins professor of psychiatry and mood disorders Kay Redfield Jamison, acclaimed author of An Unquiet Mind, trains her expertise on one of the most acclaimed poets of the 20th century in her new book Robert Lowell: Setting the River on Fire. We discuss how Lowell’s manic-depressive disease influenced his writing, the importance of his strength of character, and how common mania is among the creative.

Summoning the Snooze

Apr 11, 2017
Jacob Stewart/Flickr via Creative Commons

When you cannot sleep, the middle of the night can be a harrowing spot. Insomnia is all too familiar for many of us. Dr. Emerson Wickwire, director of the insomnia program at the University of Maryland Medical Center, joins us to talk about the causes of this maddening affliction and how best to summon the snooze. Original air date: November 30, 2016.

Sine Die 2017

Apr 10, 2017
Rachel Baye / WYPR

It’s Sine Die – or, translating loosely, “no tomorrow.” Whatever proposals Maryland’s legislators don’t act on by midnight will be let undone. We reflect on what passed, what died, and what elected officials are expected to take up again next year. Our analysts: WYPR Statehouse reporter Rachel Baye and political commentator Barry Rascovar.

Time now for another Stoop story. This week we hear a story from Mark Lowry about growing up in Baltimore’s Charles Village. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Rachel Baye / WYPR

Days before the General Assembly session ends, legislators are involved in heated arguments about whether state law should limit local police cooperation with federal immigration enforcement. Reporter Josh Hicks of the Washington Post fills us in.

Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens

Tis the season for soil testing, buying seeds, and starting plants indoors. As the date of last frost approaches, we get advice on planning and prepping your garden from Erin Mellenthin, Master Gardener Coordinator for the University of Maryland Extension in Baltimore City, and Kate Blom, supervisor of the Rawlings Conservatory. 

For individuals with autism and their families, the transition from adolescence to adulthood can be uncertain, with concerns about work, housing, medical care, and more. We speak to advocate Pam Beck and her son, Brandon, as well as Keily Law, research director of the Interactive Autism Network, about supporting young people with autism as they journey into adulthood.

Last month, the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center opened to the public in Dorchester County, on a 17-acre park. The center illustrates Tubman’s life and her work as a liberator. We speak to Chris Elcock, a senior associate at the Baltimore firm GWWO, Inc. Architects. He tells us how the center's design references Tubman's courage and the history of slavery in Maryland. Plus, historian Tony Cohen, founder of The Menare Foundation, describes what escape on the Underground Railroad was like.

Ben Hamburger

A MICA pop-up exhibit titled “Facing Change: Portraits and Narratives of the Shifting Cultural Landscape in East Baltimore” explores the consequences of urban development on a community. Artist Ben Hamburger’s portraits and audio narratives of East Baltimore residents offer different perspectives on development and the meaning of home. Check out more of Ben's work here.

Maryland’s highest court told judges to minimize use of money bail, and the Legislative Black Caucus backs that approach. But the Senate passed and sent to the House a bill saying judges MUST look at money bail, along with other options. All this after the bail-bond industry made big campaign donations to key legislators. We speak to Jennifer Bevan-Dangel, executive director of Common Cause Maryland, which tracked those campaign contributions, and Democratic Senator Anthony Muse, who sponsored the bill.

This week we hear a story from Hope Marshall, about her struggle with depression and the stigma surrounding mental illness. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Writer and journalist Alex Kotlowitz has written books, articles, radio shows and a TV documentary about various ways urban violence affects young people and shapes their lives. On Monday he’ll be in Baltimore for the Johns Hopkins “Social Determinants of Health Symposium.”

LAWRENCE OP / FLICKR VIA CREATIVE COMMONS

Small-muscle athletes. In the medical field, that’s the term for musicians. Musicians are prone to a range of injuries. It’s a pitfall of the profession. But unlike their large-muscle counterparts, musicians don’t get much pro-active attention when it comes to pain. As Dr. Raymond Wittstadt, attending hand surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital puts it, “I mean even at the high school level, most sports teams will have a trainer on the sidelines. There’s nobody in the wings of the BSO saying we practiced too long today, or we repeated that passage too many times.” Wittstadt has held a monthly musicians’ clinic at the center for more than 15 years.

via The Emporiyum

A free, public conference this weekend at the American Visionary Arts Museum builds upon its current exhibit about the future of food. We hear from presenter Deborah Mizeur, the co-owner of Apotheosis Herb Farm on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Conference details available here

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