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Sports at Large

AP Photo/Tony Avelar

One of the most intriguing questions of the NFL offseason has been is Colin Kaepernick being blackballed?

For most of the first six years of his career, Kaepernick was the starting quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers.

Baltimore football fans should remember that it was Kaepernick that got the Niners to within a drive of tying or winning the 2012 Super Bowl against the Ravens.

In the following season, Kaepernick helped lead San Francisco to the NFC championship game and a narrow loss to Seattle.

Kaepernick not only possesses a strong arm, but, at 6-foot-4 and 225 pounds, he has a frame that makes him a dual threat, namely a quarterback who can run.

Christopher Paulin/flickr

There’s an old trick among sports executives and marketers that if your team is devoid of talent or hope for the coming season, you instead play up anniversaries or even facilities.

We’ll have an interesting indication of how good the Orioles brass think the team will be this year if they push the 25th anniversary of Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

Seabamirum/flickr

If you’re a woman and you can handle a hockey stick, don’t wander far from your phone. You just might be getting a call to play for your country.

The women’s world championships, the international competition just below the Olympics in terms of prestige, takes place starting Thursday in Plymouth, Michigan.

The United States team, which has won the world championship seven times and won five Olympic medals over the last 17 years, should be a heavy favorite to do well in this year’s championships.

That is, if USA Hockey, the governing body for international hockey in this country, can find enough talented players to play.

Sarah Elbeshbishi/The Current

The NCAA men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, known in some circles as March Madness, officially launched last week to run through early April.

But, if you ask Je’Nan Hayes, March Madness didn’t wait for last Thursday to get started. It had already begun.

Hayes is a junior at Watkins Mill High School in Montgomery County. She’s a reserve on the school’s girls basketball team, which had a pretty successful 2017 season, getting all the way to the regional finals of the state tournament.

As the Watkins Mill school newspaper first reported, Hayes, who is Muslim and wears a hijab, a head covering used by female practitioners of the faith, had played in the Wolverines’ first 24 games.

AP Photo/David Goldman

One of the more attractive aspects of sports for many is the idea that in athletics, it’s actions that carry the day over words.

Every so often, however, an athlete’s words far outpace his on-field performance and force us to take stock of what’s been said and done.

Andre Iguodala is a reserve player with the Golden State Warriors of the NBA. He’s been a solid, if not spectacular player through his 13-year career, making an All-Star team once and winning a gold medal with the U.S. Olympic team in London five years ago.

Alex Schierholtz/flickr

For three years now, the Ravens have been model citizens on the subject of domestic violence, assiduously avoiding any player who had a direct connection to inflicting hurt on a woman or child.

The video of former running back Ray Rice that surfaced in the spring of 2014 and the fallout that followed pretty much ensured that team owner Steve Bischiotti would be highly circumspect bordering on hostile about any player carrying that baggage.

But Bischiotti and his brain trust have a potentially significant challenge to their stance, namely a pressing need and a player with domestic violence issues who could fill that need.

Brandon Marshall, who was just released by the New York Jets, is a six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver.

AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

There are few things more precious than the relationship between a boy and his mother.

It appears that relationship between Shaquille O’Neal and his mother, Lucille, may be enough to nip a bizarre feud in the bud.

"Ascendant" Baltimore

Feb 20, 2017
tedstake.monumentalsportsnetwork.com

Under the category of “It’s always nice to be wanted,” that was a really sweet civic kiss that Ted Leonsis threw at Charm City on the front of the local newspaper Sunday.

Leonsis, who owns the indoor sports teams in Washington and the arena they play in, called Baltimore "ascendant" in The Baltimore Sun, to explain why he bought two Arena Football League teams and placed one at Royal Farms Arena.

Indeed, Leonsis said that while people think it’s crazy for him to own both the Washington Valor and the Baltimore Brigade, he thinks the Brigade can stimulate Royal Farms Arena, create jobs and bring people into downtown.

wikipedia

Though we are both University of Maryland graduates, I don’t really know Under Armour founder and CEO Kevin Plank. We’ve never met and we don’t travel in the same social circles, so I really shouldn’t presume to speak for him.

That said, I’m guessing Plank had no idea the proverbial hail storm he set off last week by paying a compliment to President Donald Trump.

Shawne Alston Twitter

Ever so quietly last week, the NCAA took a long, overdue baby step toward making things right for the chattel that keeps college sports in business, namely the players.

The organization that governs collegiate athletics in this country and 11 college conferences reached a tentative agreement in a class action lawsuit filed three years ago by a former West Virginia running back.

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