Talking With The Candidates | WYPR

Talking With The Candidates

Credit John Gotty

Ahead of Maryland's April 26 primary election and continuing through the summer and fall campaigns for the November 8th General Election, former Maryland Morning and now Midday host Tom Hall has been talking with candidates for a variety of local, state and national public offices -- including Baltimore's Mayor, City Council, and Maryland's US House and Senate seats.  Tom Hall has questioned the candidates about their experience, their vision and their plans to lead the city, the state or the nation into a challenging future.  

If you have suggestions or questions, drop us a note via email or send us a tweet to @middaytomhall or give us a call at 410-881-3162.

The Baltimore City Sitting Judges Campaign

Next month, Baltimore City voters will be asked to elect judges to the 8th Circuit Court. Of the eight candidates, six are sitting judges running in what’s known as a retention election. 

The sitting judges -- Shannon Avery, Michael DiPietro, Karen “Chaya” Friedman, Cynthia Jones, Audrey Carrión and Wanda Keyes Heard – were appointed by former Governors after being recommended by a non-partisan commission. The judges are campaigning as a block, although they will not be identified as “sitting judges” on the ballot. Last week, the two candidates not appointed by a governor, Todd Oppenheim and James Kraft, were on the program. Sitting Judges Shannon Avery and Cynthia Jones join Tom to discuss how they were appointed and why they deserve to keep their seats.  

On April 26, Baltimore city residents will vote to elect judges to the 8th Circuit Court. Of the eight candidates on the ballot, six are sitting judges -- appointed by a governor -- running in what is known as a retention election. The two remaining candidates, James Kraft and Todd Oppenheim were not appointed by a judge and are running independently.

Oppenheim has been a public defender in Baltimore for 11 years.  Kraft is a sitting city councilman in Baltimore’s 1st district; he’s been on the council since 2004. Both men join Tom in-studio to discuss why they’re running to be judges, despite not receiving a gubernatorial appointment.  

electcalvinyoung.com

Now, another in our series of interviews with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore, in which Maryland Morning host Tom Hall asks each candidate about their vision for the city.  

Tom's guest is Calvin Young, a 28-year-old engineer who lives in Hamilton, Maryland. He is a Harvard Business School graduate who has never held elective office.   He was the second candidate, after former Mayor Sheila Dixon, to file to run as a Democrat for mayor of Baltimore, officially launching his campaign in mid-August, 2015, before current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced she would not seek re-election.  Young is a Baltimore native who graduated from Poly and New York University, and is a former city youth commissioner.  He has also served as an aide in the White House National Economic Council, helping to develop economic and business development policy recommendations for the President. He spoke with Tom in studio on March 10, 2016. 

GLAAD

Today, we continue our series of conversations with candidates for Mayor of Baltimore.  DeRay McKesson is a native Baltimorean, and he’s worked as an administrator in the Baltimore City Public Schools.  He’s 30 years old, and for the past year or so he has been a full time activist, working in Ferguson, Baltimore and elsewhere on issues that include police misconduct and mass incarceration.  He has never held public office.  He’s on the ballot in the Democratic primary on April 26th , the last  candidate to file to run for the Baltimore mayor's office. Within days of his filing, Mckesson  released a comprehensive plan to address the city's most pressing issues, including proposals to expand educational programs and to begin major reforms of the Baltimore police department.  DeRay Mckesson joins Tom to share his vision for the City.

CindyWalshForMayor

Maryland Morning has been hosting a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  All told, there will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26 primary ballot,  along with five Republicans.  Three Green Party Candidates will compete in their own Green Party primary on May 1. One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot on Tuesday, November, 8.

Today, another in our series of weekly conversations with candidates who are on the ballot in the April 26 primary. We continue our focus this week on the race for the United States Senate. Congressman Chris Van Hollen has represented Maryland’s 8th congressional district since 2003. He is running in the Democratic primary to be the party's standard bearer in the November election to replace Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who is retiring early next year. Tom talks with Rep. Van Hollen about the issues that will face a new Senate and a new President in 2017, and about his vision for Maryland and the country.

cupidformayor.com

 Today, we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have also registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party Candidates will compete in their own May 1st primary balloting.  One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot in November. 

Tom's guest is Gersham Cupid.  The Edgecomb neighborhood resident is a 10-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department, where he holds the rank of sergeant. He is a Democrat. He is 28 years old and married, with a child on the way. Cupid has never before held elective office, but as he explains to Tom, Baltimore is sorely in  need of new and more effective leadership, and his years of public service as a police officer have prepared him for the mayor's job. His top-priority issue for the city is public safety.

abetterbaltimore.org

Maryland Morning host Tom Hall has been conducting a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for mayor of Baltimore.  There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have also registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party candidates will be competing in a separate Green Party primary on May 1st. One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are Unaffiliated (with any party) will appear on the General Election ballot on November 8th. 

Continuing his conversations with mayoral candidates about their visions for Baltimore, Tom speaks with Democrat Patrick Gutierrez, a former Bank of America operations manager who has also worked with the non-profit Downtown Baltimore Family Alliance.   Married and the father of two young children, the 43-year-old Taylor Heights resident believes the most important issue facing Baltimore today is its lack of strong leadership, and the inefficiency and lack of accountability he says are rife in city agencies.

donnaedwards.house.gov

We've been spending the past several Wednesdays here on Maryland Morning talking to the Democratic candidates for mayor of Baltimore.  Today, we shift our focus to another important race that will be decided in the April 26th primary election.  The race for the United States Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Barbara Mikulski is almost as crowded with candidates as the race for mayor of Baltimore:  10 Democrats and 14 Republicans have thrown their hats in the ring.   We've invited the two leading Democratic candidates in the race to join us on Maryland Morning, this week and next.

Today, Tom's guest is Congresswoman Donna Edwards. She has represented Maryland's 4th Congressional District since 2008.  The Fort Washington resident currently serves on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, as well as the Science, Space and Technology Committee. 

Next week, Tom's guest will be Rep. Edwards' chief rival for the US Senate seat, Representative Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat who represents Maryland's 8th Congressional District.

carlstokes2016.com

Today, we continue our series of  Wednesday conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore, in which Maryland Morning host Tom Hall asks the candidates about their vision for the city.  

There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party candidates, 1 Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot in November. 

Tom's guest this week is Baltimore City Councilman Carl Stokes.  He is a Democrat.  He is 65 years old.  He lives in Greater Greenmount, and he’s the father of two daughters.  As a young man, Stokes first managed and then owned a chain of men's clothing stores, before turning to politics and winning election to the City Council in 1987.  He served for eight years, and when he left the Council in 1995, he was appointed to serve on the Baltimore City School Board.  He later worked as the vice president of a medical equipment and supplies company and was Chief Operating Officer of The Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy, a public-charter middle school for boys which he co-founded in 2006 in East Baltimore.  In 2010, when Stephanie Rawlings Blake became mayor following Sheila Dixon’s resignation, Jack Young’s councilman seat in District 12 opened up after Mr. Young was appointed city council president.  Carl Stokes was appointed to fill Mr. Young’s seat ; in 2011, he was elected to that seat on the council, where he currently serves District 12 as chair of the Taxation, Finance and Economic Development Committee.  He is giving up the seat to run for mayor, an office he first ran for in 1999 and again in 2011.

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