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technology

Smart Cities

Sep 20, 2017

What do you think of when you think of a Smart City? Wi-fi hubs, self-driving vehicles, maybe…  but what about data analysis and research institutions? In this hour, Wes explores the idea of Smart Cities – connectivity hubs that use big data to change the way we interact in urban environments. We’ll be learning from the example of Seattle, Washington – a city that just hired a Smart City Coordinator and has been leading the way when it comes to urban innovation – we’ll then speak with two leaders at Johns Hopkins devoted to making city government more efficient and effective.

In this hour, Wes explores education technology and online learning – discussing everything from coding as a foreign language to the potential dangers of the privatization. We’ll also learn how online learning has the potential to make education more equitable and accessible. Wes speak with some of the most influential people in the field of education technology and asks tough questions about the future of learning here in Baltimore and beyond. 


Lucélia Ribeiro / Flickr via Creative Commons

 

Kik. Whisper. Yik Yak. Social media apps like these help teens and tweens connect in a digital world. Social media can broaden horizons, and help young people develop social skills. But the Internet has a darker side, especially for kids. The anonymity of the online experience allows easy access for sexual predators and cyberbullies. Plus, a frivolous social media post can live online … and damage future job and college prospects. How can parents stay informed about an ever-changing Internet landscape? How can they help their kids safely navigate that landscape? Adam Rosenberg and Drew Fidler of the Baltimore Child Abuse Center discuss the perils of the Internet for teens and tweens, and share tips for parents.

Tech Check!

Feb 10, 2014
Credit: martwork / Stock.xchng / Creative Commons
martwork / Stock.xchng / Creative Commons

It's our regular "Tech Check" with Andrew Zaleski, lead reporter for the tech news website, Technically Baltimore. He joins Nathan Sterner in the studio.