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WYPR Features

Ellouise Schoettler's Living History

Jun 22, 2017

This July, Maryland Humanities is commemorating the centennial of the United States’ entry into World War I with its free living history performance series, Chautauqua. Ellouise Schoettler, a storyteller whose living history performance is drawn from letters from Maryland nurses who served in France during the War, tells us more.

frankieleon/flickr

You may have heard people say that as many as half of all households with Americans 55 and older have no retirement savings at all. The source for this statement is none other than the U.S. Government Accountability Office or GAO.  

Anirban has more. 


On the Saturday night of July 7, 1937, crowds are making their way along the Light Street below Pratt to Pier 5, there to board the moonlight excursion boat, the Bay Belle. The boat would go down as far as Fort McHenry and then turn around and come back to Pier 5, an hour or so later.

But on its way past the Hull street wharf in Locust Point the boat would pass a gang of six or seven-year-old boys frolicking on the pier, watching the Bay Belle slip by. They had their own way of greeting the passengers on the boat, and this is the story of that special way.

This episode aired in July 2015. 

"Front Royal"

Jun 22, 2017

On May 23, 1862, 1st Maryland Federal troops met and fought Confederate soldiers, also from Maryland, under the command of Stonewall Jackson at Front Royal. 

Job Creation

Jun 21, 2017
Kathryn Decker/flickr

Last month, unemployment sank to just 4.3 percent, its lowest level in 16 years. That sounds like good news, but the unemployment rate largely dipped for the wrong reasons. The nation added 138,000 jobs in May according to the government’s preliminary estimate, but that was a disappointing tally.  


Tom Pelton

It’s a warm June night and a full moon is painting a silvery path across the gentle ripples on Delaware Bay.

I’m on the beach, southeast of Dover.   And from the darkness of the bay, I watch what looks like an invading force of army helmets with eyes on them emerge from the murk to crowd, clatter and scrape against each other along the shoreline.

These are horseshoe crabs – prehistoric creatures that have been summoned by full moons and high tides like this for hundreds of millions of years to perform this springtime mass mating ritual on the beach.


Click on the image for the book list. 

The American Eel

Jun 20, 2017
Theresa Keil, National Aquarium

They’re seldom seen, but Baltimore’s Inner Harbor plays an important role in their lifecycle. Learn more about American Eels.

This episode aired in February 2017. 

Glenn Euloth/Flickr Creative Commons

One of the most popular questions I overhear at Irvine’s comes from every age group. Our Nature Preschoolers ask it. High school-aged visitors on field trips ask it. Moms and dads coming in to hike the trails ask it. And then right on their heels, seniors from our area garden clubs ask it too.

What’s the difference between frogs and toads?

This episode aired in May 2016.

 

Timothy Vollmer/flickr

I just got back from my trip to Spain, and boy did I eat well. We did a fair amount of tapas and a fair amount of sit-down dinners, and since I had my notebook with me, I brought back some ideas. And I'm sure that Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Coking School would have been going nuts sampling all that good food.

Click on the picture for recipes.

Pollution

Jun 20, 2017
Ionescu Iulian/flickr

The global environment has been in the news a lot lately. You may have heard it said that among the world’s greatest polluters are China and India, the world’s two most populous nations and also among its most rapidly growing economically. The International Monetary Fund predicts that China’s economy will expand 6.6 percent this year and that India’s will expand by more than 7 percent.  


apox apox/flickr

Today's Clear Path looks at the expansion of Medicaid for lower income adults and children and how changes to the ACA could impact this coverage. Hector De La Torre tells us more.

This segment originally aired March 27, 2017. 

On Revolutionary Mothering and Loving Baltimore

Jun 19, 2017

Karsonya "Dr. K" Whitehead shares her path to practicing revolutionary mothering and why she continues to do so in Baltimore City. 

Aging Vehicles

Jun 19, 2017

According to an IHS Markit study, the average age of vehicles on American roads is now a record 11.6 years.  There are many reasons for this, including the higher quality of new vehicles. As pointed out by an analyst at Kelley Blue Book, many people are "basically driving around in a rotary phone close."

James Graham

Jun 16, 2017

Tom talks with James Graham, the writer of Finding Neverland at the Hippodrome Theater, June 27-July 2, 2017.

Learn what's going on in the Bromo Arts and Entertainment District here

Rene Schwietzke/flickr

Next time you go to the mall, you should probably give it a big hug and wish it luck. A new report from Credit Suisse predicts that between 20 and 25 percent of American malls will close within five years. As reported by CNNMoney, that level of dislocation would be unprecedented in the nation’s history.  

Anirban has more. 


It’s easy and comfortable ride for Baltimoreans to get from Highlandtown on the east side of the harbor to Locust Point on the west. But up through the late 1940s ferry boats carried hundreds daily, from one side of the harbor to the other. And during WWII shipyard workers aboard created the first, last, and oldest establishment floating crap game in Baltimore. 

Aranami/flickr

The U.S. economy remains the largest in the world and consumer spending supports two-thirds of all activity. You might remember that after the 9/11 attacks, consumers were urged to come to the economy’s rescue by spending more aggressively. And as pointed out by a recent Barron’s article, these ought to be boom times for U.S.consumers. 


Retirement Savings

Jun 15, 2017
frankieleon/flickr

The data regarding how few Americans are ready for retirement are simply staggering. According to a report from the Economic Policy Institute, nearly half of families have no retirement account savings at all.  The median retirement savings figure among all working age families in the United States is just $5,000.

Historic Ocean City

Jun 15, 2017

Many of us spend our summer vacation time at Ocean City – but do you know the history behind this scenic beach and boardwalk? Meagan Baco, communications director at Preservation Maryland, tells us how this go-to summer spot came to be, and how her organization works to preserve its history for generations to come.

This segment originally aired July 2016.

 

Joining us today is Calvin Butler, CEO of Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE.) He shares how BGE's Smart Energy Workforce Development Program is preparing the energy industry's future workforce. Butler was just honored with the Industrialist of the Year award last week, and the Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore was just recognized this morning for its partnership with BGE and for its commitment to the region.

This episode originally aired on Oct. 13, 2016.

Albariño Wines

Jun 14, 2017
Evan Bench/flickr

Albariño is a white grape grown in Spain and Portugal. The grape produces varietal, light colored wines. Click on the picture for the wine list.

Early detection can help make a world of difference for a child with autism specturm disorder and his or her family. 

Karine Clessia/flickr

Remember when we used phones primarily to make phone calls. Now we text, tweet, Snap, bank, shop, order food and transportation on our devices. We also play a lot of games. For the first time ever, revenue from computer games exceeded $100 billion globally in a single year. The gamer capital of the world is China, which has overtaken the U.S. in terms of market size.

"The Mermaid"

Jun 14, 2017

In the Spring of 1778, during the war of Independence, 

the HMS Mermaid surrendered to residents of a small town along the Maryland coast rather than be taken as a prize of the French sailors chasing him.  

Aimee Plesa/flickr

I've been firing up my grill for a few weeks now, and ever since we did a show on smoking with wood chips, I've been cooking up some very tasty food. But if you want to increase the flavor of your steaks, ribs and roasts, you can't beat the direct approach:  going with marinades and rubs. And this is where Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School can get very creative. Click on the picture to the left for instructions and recipes.

Click on the image for the book list. 

Think Progress

For decades, the federal government has neglected the infrastructure of Baltimore and other urban areas across the country -- allowing sewage systems to leak, water pipes to burst, and roads to become pock-marked with holes.

So, when Donald Trump promised on the campaign trail last year that he would invest a trillion dollars rebuilding American infrastructure, it seemed like the one area where urbanites and suburbanites, Democrats and Republicans, Trump and even Bernie Sanders, could potentially agree. 

It’s a patriotic impulse:  We need to rebuild a crumbling America.  But then, last week, Trump held a press conference to announce his actual plans. As it turns out, instead of spending more taxpayer money to improve America’s roads, bridges and pipes, Trump plans to do to the opposite.


Tom Blackwell/flickr

It is well known that less educated workers tend to make less money than those with more education.  Recent data indicate that that’s hardly where the differences end. The Federal Reserve Bank’s latest Survey of Household Economics and Decision making, a treasure trove of workforce data derived from the survey responses of more than 600 respondents, indicates that less educated workers also suffer irregular, unpredictable work schedules. 

Fairness in Markets

Jun 13, 2017

"More diverse participation creates better markets" says Josh Fidler. Listen to this commentary for more of his thoughts. 

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