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WYPR Features

Destination: Baltimore

Feb 6, 2018

Samuel Hoi, president of MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art,) on Baltimore's growing prominence as a visitor destination.

Pea Crabs

Feb 6, 2018
FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/flickr

Excuse me waiter, there’s a pea crab in my oyster…If you’ve ever opened an oyster and found a little orange crab inside, consider yourself lucky! Many seafood lovers have called this tiny, spider-like crab a delicious surprise for many years. In fact, an article in The New York Times from 1913 recalls a story of a restaurant patron who sent his soup back with disgust upon finding a small orange “critter” in it. He was not aware that the tiny crab that had turned his stomach was a highly-prized delicacy - back in 1913, pea crabs sold for $2 a portion, which is roughly $50 today! Even George Washington was well documented as a fan of this fine food. So, what exactly is a pea crab?

The National Aquarium

Mysterious, misunderstood jellyfish are swimming right in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Let's take a look at what their presence indicates and how climate change is playing a role. 

This episode originally aired in March 2017. 

Tasha/flickr

Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School and I invited a long-time friend of the show, Liz Nuttle to come on and tell us how the creative application of oils and vinegars can make a huge difference.

Say oil and most people think olive oil, especially the authentic extra virgin kind.  But most oils come not from fruit (which the olive is) but from nuts and seeds.  Some of the most popular include our favorite, roasted sesame seed oil, almond oil, hazelnut oil, sunflower oil, grape seed oil, macadamia nut oil, peanut oil, pumpkin seed oil, soybean oil, flaxseed oil, and walnut oil.

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

A new study by the Transamerica Institute highlights the promises and pitfalls faced by 'Baby Boomers,' Generation X-ers and Millennials. As these younger groups could live longer lives, Catherine shares what the implications could be for retirement. 

Also for the week of February 2, American fertility rates. 

Zöe Charlton

Feb 2, 2018

Chris Bedford and Baltimore-based artist Zöe Charlton discuss the meanings behind her surreal life-size figurative drawings and how people relate to images of bodies.

McKeldin's Speech

Feb 1, 2018

On the summer night of July 11, 1962 at the Republican National Convention in Chicago, those in the hall and millions watching television saw and heard Theodore R. McKeldin, former Mayor of Baltimore and incumbent Governor of Maryland, nominate General Dwight David Eisenhower for president of the United States...

Venroy July, Counsel for Miles and Stockbridge on what draws people to Baltimore, and what makes them stay.

We’ve spoken repeatedly about the notion that you would likely be better off financially in retirement if you worked for more years and waited to begin claiming Social Security.  Not only does working longer allow one to save more money for retirement, but delaying the receipt of Social Security benefits increases the value of monthly benefits.  Here’s another reason to hold off collecting those Social Security checks – if you retire early, you are more likely to die earlier as well...

Ira Aldridge: London’s First Black Othello

Feb 1, 2018

In 1833, English audiences were shocked to see an African American man play the role of Shakespeare’s Othello. Ira Aldridge was London’s first African-American Othello and is the subject of the play Red Velvet by Lolita Chakrabarti. Shirley Basfield Dunlap, Director of Red Velvet at Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, tells us about Aldridge. Dunlap is an Associate Professor, and the Theatre Coordinator, at Morgan State University.

After working together for 22 years, Matthew Henson and Robert E. Peary located the North Pole in April, 1909. History, however,  would record only Peary's name as having made the discovery.

http://bodegasborsao.com

Al and Hugh give their picks for Spanish Garnachas, a red grape variety. 

Invest Now.

Jan 31, 2018

Nobel Prize-winning economist James Heckman explains a simple idea in which everyone profits: invest in little kids. 

Tom Pelton

Twelve years ago, Baltimore spent $2.2 million on an erosion control project in a stream called the Stony Run that flows through a beautiful wooded park in North Baltimore. The city brought in bulldozers, cut down about 150 trees, and built rock walls and dams in an effort to slow the water’s flow.

The project succeeded in creating a series of pools in which minnows now live. But there is no evidence that it achieved its main objective: catching and reducing sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus pollution being washed downstream into the Chesapeake Bay.

Then, about two years after it was built, rain storms overwhelmed the system. The storms knocked the streamside boulders down into the waterway and required the construction crews and backhoes to return to the park again to fix it, temporarily.

A few years later, this fix was undone by another set of rain storms that again bashed the rocks out of place -- requiring a new round of repairs, this time costing $500,000. 

Goulash

Jan 30, 2018
Elsie Hui/flickr

I sometimes wonder if the concept of long, slow cooking didn't develop in the bleak mid-winter.  There's something about filling your home, hour after hour, with the aromas of something tasty bubbling away in a kettle. One such dish that I try to make at least once a winter is goulash, that soul satisfying stew of slowly cooked beef and onions...and of course a bowl full of spices. And Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School can vouch for this, it should come as no surprise that goulash comes in about a million different versions, as is typical of most simple, irresistible dishes.

With today's episode we start our second year of the Weekly Reader... which means there are now 52 shows archived on our website. Today, we add to those recommendations with a couple of fascinating new memoirs. 

Improving Patient Education

Jan 30, 2018

Dr. Redonda Miller, president of The Johns Hopkins Hospital, comments on the need for clearer and relevant patient education.

Blue Crabs

Jan 30, 2018
AKZOphoto/flickr

As I sat in my car this morning, with the defroster on and the heat blasting, I thought about warmer weather. It seemed like just a few weeks ago I was sitting at the dinner table with friends and family enjoying one of my favorite Maryland treats – Blue Crabs. It will be awhile before I get to dig into this summer staple again and it seems like forever until I’ll need air conditioning in my car.

Theresa Keil, National Aquarium

They’re seldom seen, but Baltimore’s Inner Harbor plays an important role in their life cycle. Learn more about the American Eel. 

For the week of January 26, Anirban covers car sales, the U.S. trade deficit and the U.S. debt burden. 

Elizabeth Strout

Jan 26, 2018

Tom talks with Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Elizabeth Strout.

Elizabeth is recommending:

The Collected Stories of William Trevor

Number Writers

Jan 26, 2018
frankieleon/flickr

In the 1940s and 1950s, before the Maryland lottery and the casinos, the betting action on the street was “on the numbers” -- and illegal. It was the bookmakers who took the bets and who controlled the action that were the target of Captain Alexander Emerson’s raids on their “places of business.” His continuing raids, staged to get them to shut down their operations and send them to jail, made him a threat to and the nemesis of their livelihood. When he died there was a coffin-side eulogy for him by a former victim…

Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger tells us about the economic impact of the Port of Baltimore.

This is a rebroadcast.

Documenting Traditions in Maryland

Jan 25, 2018

Did you know that Business Insider reported that, in 2016, over 68 million people watched documentary films on Netflix? How do filmmakers create a documentary that both resonates with an audience and helps to preserve local history?  Matt Kelley, filmmaker and CEO of Human Being Productions, talks about the company’s mini-documentary series, Traditions.  Each video in the series centers on the history of a Maryland institution.

Dashiell Hammett, born on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1894, worked for the Pinkerton Detective Agency before turning to writing, creating such memorable characters as Sam Spade and The Thin Man.

The New York Times

Earlier this month, the Trump Administration announced that it would open up the entire Eastern Seaboard to offshore drilling – including at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.

“Offshore energy production will reduce the cost of energy, create countless new jobs, and make America more secure and far more energy independent,” Trump said.

Immediately after the announcement, the Republican governor of Florida, Rick Scott – leader of a politically important swing state where Trump maintains a waterfront mansion -- met with Trump’s secretary of the interior, Ryan Zinke. The governor voiced his strong objection to the offshore drilling near his state, because oil spills and unsightly oil platforms might put Florida’s tourism industry at risk.

Zinke quickly switched positions, and announced that Florida – but only Florida – was exempt and would not have offshore drilling.

 

So now we are into 2018, which means that we are in the midst of another year during which people will be both fretting about and preparing for retirement.  As indicated by U.S. News, there are some reasons to believe that your retirement will be meaningfully better than the one your grandparents lived. At the heart of this optimism are technological advances...

On this episode, Marion reviews three new books that feature rather unstable female protagonists. 

missy/flickr

During these cold, dark weeks I like to pass the time cozying up with some of my old cookbooks.  One book I return to time and again is called "Scheherazade's Feast" by Habeeb Salloum.  The book finds inspiration in the cuisine of the medieval Arab world, including the region of Morocco. The recipes are adapted for the modern kitchen, and as Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School can attest, Moroccan cooking is outright fabulous. And to boot, it pairs up extremely well with locally produced Maryland meats, seafood and vegetables.

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