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WYPR Features

Tom Blackwell/flickr

It is well known that less educated workers tend to make less money than those with more education.  Recent data indicate that that’s hardly where the differences end. The Federal Reserve Bank’s latest Survey of Household Economics and Decision making, a treasure trove of workforce data derived from the survey responses of more than 600 respondents, indicates that less educated workers also suffer irregular, unpredictable work schedules. 

Fairness in Markets

Jun 13, 2017

"More diverse participation creates better markets" says Josh Fidler. Listen to this commentary for more of his thoughts. 

frankieleon/flickr

What do those in the job market need to be thinking about when it comes to 401K? Catherine gives us some insight. 

Rising Wages

Jun 12, 2017
elycefeliz/flickr

Economists have been debating one of the economy’s central mysteries for months – with unemployment rates so low, why are wages rising barely faster than the pace of inflation.  As workers become more difficult to recruit, the notion is that compensation should be bid higher, but that isn’t happening at the pace one might expect... 

Keith Allison/flickr

If you’re an Orioles fan and you’re looking for a piece of good news from this past weekend, some ray of sunshine from three otherwise lousy days and nights in New York, it may be this: The Birds won’t have to go back to Yankee Stadium until the middle of September. That’s pretty much where the optimism begins and ends from three days of horrors in the Bronx.

Simply put, the Orioles were mugged in New York. They’re certainly not the first tourists to be mistreated in the Boogie Down, but this was ridiculous.

Weird Foods

Jun 11, 2017
caleb boller/flickr

Chef Wolf and Tony explore all the weird things they've tried to cook and some memorable food and drink combinations. And Tony tries to get Chef to tell a turtle story...things get weird on this episode of Foreman and Wolf on Food and Wine.

Butterflies

Jun 11, 2017

Butterflies of all kinds can be found flitting across our listening area’s woods, fields, yards and gardens. In fact, Maryland has more than 150 species of these winged wonders. Brooks wits down with Laura Soder, Irvine’s coordinator of its native Butterfly House, to chat about butterflies.

This episode originally aired in June 2016. 

Jellyfish

Jun 11, 2017
THE NATIONAL AQUARIUM

Mysterious, misunderstood jellyfish are swimming right in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Let's take a look at what their presence indicates and how climate change is playing a role. 

This episode originally aired in March 2017. 

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

You may have noticed that the stock market has been on quite a tear recently. However, volatility may be on the way back. Recently, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged by more than 370 points, or by 1.8 percent during a single day due to political turmoil in Washington, D.C. But that was just one day and the stock market quickly recovered.

Anirban has more. 


There was a time after last year’s elections that many experts were predicting a sharp bounce in economic growth in the U.S. As indicated by writer Nelson Schwartz, that sharp bounce is beginning to look more like a small bump. It is not that the economy is necessarily weakening or that a recession is imminent. Rather, it appears that the pace of growth this year won’t be much more than it was last year or the year before that.  

Anirban has more. 


William Warby/flickr

Out on Dulaney Valley Road at Dance Mill Road, a yellow school bus turns into a narrow road. In minutes, the school children-- as thousands did before and after —disembark. They have come this day in 1955 to Cloverland Farms—to see cows milked! But in 1981 the milking barn closed---leaving subsequent generations of children believing, this story goes, that maybe chocolate milk comes from brown cows.

Mad About Menhaden

Jun 8, 2017
BRIAN GRATWICKE/FLICKR

Why are Atlantic Menhaden in demand? Listen to find out!

Ricardo/flickr

While there has been a considerable volume of discussion recently regarding the curtailment of immigration in America, recent data indicate that through 2016, the foreign born share of the labor force continued to expand. According to U.S. Labor Department data, last year, there were 27 million foreign born people in the U.S. Labor Force. That translates into nearly 17 percent of the workforce. 

Anirban has more.

Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger tells us about the economic impact of the Port of Baltimore.

Politics and newspaper publishing prove a potent mix in the early 19th century in Baltimore. 

Tom Pelton

Baltimore, my home, has its troubles. But one thing the city has done remarkably well over the last year is to encourage urban bicycling – which cuts down on traffic and air pollution, and supports a healthier quality of life.

As part of a new network of bicycle lanes, the city last fall opened a protected, double-wide bike lane down 2.6 miles of Maryland Avenue, connecting the Johns Hopkins University campus at 29th Street, in the north, to Pratt Street and the Inner Harbor, in the south.

In past decades, city officials have painted numerous bike lanes on streets, of course. But these have been essentially meaningless, because cars drive right over them, sometimes killing cyclists. But this new Maryland Avenue bike lane is different. It’s a biking superhighway, 10 feet wide, totally protected from traffic by a line of white plastic divider sticks, and then a row of parked cars, which have been moved a dozen feet away from the curb.


Sweet Vermouth

Jun 7, 2017

Click on the picture for the wine list. Radio Kitchen food for thought: The Market Report.

Click on the image for the list. 

Rural Poverty

Jun 7, 2017
cisc1970/flickr

When people consider the presence concentrations of poverty in America, they may envision the conditions frequently associated with inner cities. Indeed, beginning at some point during the 1980s, the nation’s most challenging communities were often found in cities, where a combination of crime and suburban flight rendered large cities less economically vibrant.

Anirban has more. 


Depressed Daddies

Jun 7, 2017

Becoming a father is wonderful. But many dad, like mothers, can be more vulnerable to depression after the birth of a child.But you’re not alone and help is available. Listen now. 

Ricardo/flickr

Despite forecasts suggesting that 2017 would be better for the global economy than 2016, economic growth during 2017’s initial quarter in developed economies slowed sharply. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development recently indicated that the combined economic output of its 35 members expanded just 0.4 percent during the first quarter.  

Anirban has more. 


Jamyla Krempel

It's been an odd spring to say the least. A lot of cool damp weather, punctuated with a few sunny days:  it makes me wonder how things are doing down on the farm. And Chef Jerry Pellegrino, one of Baltimore's leading chefs, knows to keep his eye on the Farmers Markets at this time of year.

Click on the picture to learn what local farms are unloading at Maryland markets!

The Nutria

Jun 6, 2017

 

With the exception of my kids after those messy, artificially flavored orange popsicles, there’s only one animal I can think of that has orange teeth. While some people might be turned off by this critter’s hairless, rat-like tail, it’s actually the teeth that stick with me.

The hooked, stubby, Tang-colored fangs protrude forward prominently. They are long, sharp and perfect for eating marsh plants.

And they belong to an animal called the nutria.

This segment aired July 2016. 

The Importance of Relationships

Jun 6, 2017

What predicts healthy, happy aging? Several studies show the answer is relationships. Sarah Hemminger of Thread tells us about the importance of having diverse, quality relationships.

elycefeliz/flickr

How much do you need for retirement? Catherine discusses the factors that will lead you to the right conclusions.

dcJohn/flickr

This was supposed to be the week where Serena Williams was going to take the next step towards removing Margaret Court from the record books.

Williams needs one more win at a major tennis tournament to match Court, who won 24 Grand Slam tournaments during her 17-year career.

The clay surface at the French Open, the site of this week’s tournament, hasn’t always been kind to Williams, but, as the world’s No.1 ranked player, she would have had a decent chance to tie Court.

That is, until Williams revealed her pregnancy a few weeks ago, which took her out of the French Open as well as Wimbledon and probably the U.S. Open for this year.

But, by the time Williams returns next year, Court may find herself irrelevant for reasons that have nothing to do with the Grand Slam record.

Better Bridges

Jun 5, 2017
melissaclark/flickr

One of our standard national narratives is that America’s infrastructure is collapsing. Our pipes leak, our water is polluted, our bridges obsolete, and our airports prehistoric. What is less often heard are some of the improvements being made to infrastructure. For instance, as indicated by writer David Harrison, America’s bridges are actually getting sounder.  

Anirban has more.


John Tornow/flickr

On today's Foreman and Wolf on Food and Wine Chef Wolf and Tony take it outside, entertaining that is! They give tips on making sangria, decorating, organizing, and everything you need to know to have a successful outdoor event. 

This segment originally aired June 2016. 

Clockwork

Jun 2, 2017
bromoseltzertower.com

On July 7, 2007, Baltimoreans whose habit it was to look up nine stories to the top of the Bromo Seltzer tower to check the time on one of its four clocks --  facing east,  west, north, south—were bewildered. The clocks were out of sync, one with the other, and showing different times. The story--when Baltimoreans didn’t know the time of day!

Kathryn Decker/flickr

The job market has steadily improved for college graduates in recent years. Unfortunately, the cities that tend to offer the most employment opportunities for recent graduates are also typically the most expensive. A recently released report from Trulia estimates the share of apartment listings that would take up less than 30 percent of the typical millennial’s paycheck in major U.S. cities. 


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