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WYPR Features

Edible Plants

Oct 12, 2017
Chris Luczkow/flickr

My kids used to gather a bucket full of plants and twigs they foraged from our backyard and offer it to me and my wife as “soup.” While most of those ingredients were inedible, you’d be surprised how many were edible and rich in vitamins and minerals! Their favorite food to serve, and most easily harvested, was Dandelions. I can remember the shock on their faces when I put the whole thing, stem and flower, in my mouth, chewed and then swallowed.

Manatees

Oct 12, 2017
aqua.org/blog

These gentle giants have rebounded in recent years, making their way off the endangered species list, but we must be vigilant to protect their resurgence. Let’s check in with manatees.   

Brittany Lindsey

Soup - a liquid dish, typically made by boiling meat, fish, or vegetables, etc., in stock or water  

That cool snap in the air is so welcome after a particularly hot summer.  And it may be my imagination but I think that cool air carries the aroma of cooking food in a way that puts a smile on my face.  This is the time for soup making, ideally a day-long process that puts a keen edge on your appetite. Here are some of Jerry and Chef Amy von Lange's ideas for simple soups.

Cleaning Up the Harbor

Oct 11, 2017

Michael "Mike" Hankin, President and CEO at Brown Advisory tells us about the efforts to clean up Baltimore's harbor, which he plans to swim across in 2020.

Almost every Irish Catholic friend I can think of has a “crazy nun story.” On this edition of "The Weekly Reader," we feature books about nuns, including Alice McDermott’s latest, "The Ninth Hour" and "Saints for All Occasions," the fourth novel by J. Courtney Sullivan. 

Tom Pelton

Most consumers know the ‘buy local’ and 'organic' labels for produce. But not everyone knows that just because something is grown locally and organically does not mean it is good for the Chesapeake Bay.

After all, factory-farmed chicken from Maryland’s Eastern Shore is local, but organic manure from this industry and Pennsylvania dairy farms are major sources of water pollution.  People who want to pick food that is healthy for both the bay and their bodies should consider supporting visionary farmers who are also dedicated to clean water.  That would include farmers like Brett Grohsgal, 56, who has been running the Even’ Star Organic Farm in southern Maryland for almost 20 years.

Instead of growing vast fields of a monoculture – like corn or soybeans –  Grohsgal allows half of his 100 acres in St. Mary’s County to remain forested.  And he aggressively rotates 70 different crops -- including cucumber, sweet potatoes and flowers -- from plot to plot on much of his remaining land. To protect the health of the two streams that flow through his property, he planted rows of black locust trees and loblolly pines to act as natural water filters.

Grohsgal is part of the new "Fair Farms" movement in Maryland.  Fair Farms is an alliance of 90 farmers, environmental organizations and farmers that supports growers who are not only organic, but also using practices like forested buffers along streams, which many conventional farmers do not use.

Medicare.gov via AP

Hector tells us about a Medicare change that has "nothing to with what you're hearing in Washington." 

Joy/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.   

As the weather begins to chill, Tony and Chef Cindy talk about soups and the challenge of matching them with wine. We hear from Eva Dehlinger of Dehlinger Winery about her favorite soup and wine pairings.

HK Elevators

Oct 6, 2017
Steve Snodgrass/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.   

On a Saturday afternoon in 1946, on an elevator in the popular downtown department store, Hochschild Kohn, a uniformed elevator operator was calling out to passengers, “Fourth  floor, Ladies dresses, special sale today!” An elevator operator selling merchandise while calling out floors? So beloved was this custom that when the store installed automatic elevators, they had to call the operators back. To call out floors and merchandise!

Abolitionist "Captain" John Brown made quite an impression on Frederick Douglass when they met, but, while bound by the same passion, 

the two men went on to fight to end slavery by very different means. 

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