WYPR Features | WYPR

WYPR Features

Jack Reitnauer, farm manager of Warwick Mushroom Farms, tells us how the success of Warwick, the largest of mushroom farm in the Western hemisphere, equals success for the region. 

In 1907, Ernest Wardwell wrote his account of the Pratt Street Riot, and how he , though not yet 16 years old, joined the ranks of the 6th Massachusetts Volunteer Militia and went off to war.

On this episode of The Weekly Reader, two new coming of age stories that also happen to be great reads.

Riesling

Apr 18, 2018
antidigital_da/flickr

Although the best Riesling may grow in Germany, other regions are having great success with the ultra-classy varietal. Click the links below to purchase Al and Hugh's recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

It’s hard to read a person’s mind. It’s even harder to read a baby’s mind. But a study from the University of Washington provides new insight into the workings of the infant brain.

Tom Pelton

In a park in West Baltimore, a spectacular arched stone bridge rises over a stream called the Gwynns Falls, which flows into Baltimore’s Inner Harbor and the Chesapeake Bay.

Although the bridge is beautiful and trees beside the stream are blossoming, when you look at the stream, you see that the Gwynns Falls is troubled. A whirpool of sludge twists under the bridge, with a gyre of Styrofoam cups and plastic bottles.

Alice Volpitta is the lead water quality scientist for Blue Water Baltimore, a nonprofit that is fighting to clean up this and other city waterways.  She points to a sign and a sewer on the banks of the river.

“Baltimore City Department of Works has posted a temporary health warning sign next to this manhole to indicate there has recently been some sort of sewage overflow coming out of this manhole,” Volpitta said. “And if you get closer, you can smell the sewage.”

Lauren Knowlton/flickr

There's an old saying that if they give you a lemon, make lemonade.  It seems to me you can say the same about the invasive Blue Catfish, a scourge of the Chesapeake Bay. And Chef Jerry Pellegrino will tell you, if there is one thing we've learned about this fish, it's that it is very tasty to eat.  So in this case revenge can be served piping hot.

To stir up interest in luring the Blue Catfish to our dinner plates, the folks at Maryland's Best Seafood are holding a contest to find the best recipe.  But before you start experimenting, here's a little basic knowledge.

The National Aquarium

Though not particularly well known, swell sharks are unassuming, harmless to humans and completely fascinating. Listen in as we discuss one of the most remarkable animals we’ve ever had the pleasure to meet. 

simplyaj10/flickr

There isn’t a lot that Adam Jones hasn’t done in his 10 years as the cornerstone of the Orioles lineup.

He’s led the team to the playoffs. Two weeks ago, he got the 2018 season off to an auspicious start with a walk-off home run in extra innings to win the team’s Opening Day game. 

Minks

Apr 17, 2018
World Atlas

As the steward of the thirteen chickens that live in my family’s coop, I’m always on the lookout for would-be predators. Through fairytales and stories, we are often told to watch out for foxes in our hen houses, but there is a predator that can be wilier, slyer, and sneakier than a fox.  This animal is ruthless and demonstrates some downright vampiric tendencies. It has a thirst for blood…chicken blood…and can be found throughout Maryland.

The predator I’m speaking of is the American mink. For some of us, our only experience with a mink of any kind is a childhood memory of our grandmother’s fur coat. Minks aren’t an animal that we would often associate with our region, but they are very common.

apox apox/flickr

Hector walks us through a major accreditation program for physicians, health care plans and medical groups provided by the National Committee for Quality Assurance.

This week: Americans' net worth of income, immigration policy, the uninsured, work-life balance in Asian countries, and IRS audits.

Bill Haley

Apr 13, 2018

In the 1950s Baltimore’s downtown movies were suffering—so many of its patrons had moved to the suburbs. Among the movie theaters abandoned in the exodus was Keith’s, at Lexington and Liberty Streets... The management of Keith’s was at long last faced with a decision—try to keep the movie theater open by bringing in sure-fire live attractions, or close the place. It decided to do the former and so brought in super-rock star Bill Haley and His Comets. In a quirky Baltimore twist, Bill Haley, whom Keith management brought in to keep the place open, was the one who closed it down. This is the story of how.

Our American Family at Historic Sotterley

Apr 12, 2018

Last year, Historic Sotterley, a former plantation in Southern Maryland, began the Descendants Project. They gathered information about anyone affiliated with Sotterley, whether they were enslaved, employed or otherwise associated with the site. This month, Sotterley hosts Our American Family, funded with a grant from Maryland Humanities. The event will connect existing and emerging stories of Sotterley descendants with members of the public interested in Southern Maryland’s history. Jeanne Pirtle, Education Director at Sotterley, tells us more about the project.

On this week's Why Baltimore, Towson University President Kim Schatzel discusses what makes the Baltimore region so unique.

Continuing the Fight: Lavinia Margaret Engle

Apr 12, 2018
Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame

The ratification of suffrage did not mark the end of the fight for women’s voting rights, according to Lavinia Margaret Engle. Women needed to stay organized to overcome any obstacles they might face in exercising their new right, she believed. So she helped to establish the Maryland League of Women Voters and led the organization for more than a decade.

Downward Mobility

Apr 12, 2018

A recent Forbes article concludes that there are 8.5 million older workers and their spouses who will experience downward mobility in retirement absent some deviation from current trend. Who are these endangered 8.5 million?

Jenny Ondioline/flickr

It's a perfect wine for the season and Al and Hugh have their recommendations for some delicious Pinot Noirs for under $25.00.  Click the links below to purchase Al and Hugh's recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

The Washington Post

At Midnight on Monday, the Maryland General Assembly’s annual session ended with applause and a traditional Latin phrase for adjournment.

“Sine die!” a state lawmaker called out, receiving loud and sustained applause in the senate chambers.

The most significant environmental bill to pass this year came in reaction to President Trump’s announcement in January that his administration would open up the East Coast to offshore drilling, including off Ocean City Maryland and at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.

State Delegate Kumar Barve, the Democratic chair of the House Environment and Transportation committee, co-sponsored a bill that will hold any drilling companies strictly liable for paying for the full cost of any damages and cleanups from oil spills.

Ravioli

Apr 11, 2018
blue moon in her eyes/flickr

As our region's markets slowly wake up this spring, we begin to encounter all sorts of tempting food. With items like fresh baby spinach sharing space with the last of winter's butternut squash our minds start conjuring up recipe ideas. One of the best ways to make use of fresh Maryland produce is to become adept at making ravioli. Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School points out, it's no exaggeration to say the possibilities are endless.

Here's some tips about making ravioli.

Get Outside Now

Apr 11, 2018


Over 55% of parents surveyed in ten countries said their children spent less than an hour a day playing outside. Shockingly the researchers determined that one in ten children never play outside. Let’s get children outside…now.   

Reflecting on MLK's Legacy

Apr 10, 2018

Rev. Alvin C. Hathaway of Union Baptist Church reflects on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination, and how the fight for justice continues. 

I was out for a walk recently when I thought I saw a small bird flying in the distance. Its wings were a purple-ish brown color with buttery yellow edges that were bordered by bright blue spots. This bird seemed like it was in no particular rush to be anywhere—it was just flying around aimlessly. No native bird I could think of had coloring like this, and birds are unlikely to fly without direction. It was then that I realized I wasn’t looking at a small bird at all—I was instead watching the flight of a large mourning cloak butterfly. The arrival of mourning cloak butterflies in our region is one of the ways that our natural world tells us that spring time is here to stay.

They aren’t from this area, but they have certainly made themselves comfortable along our shores. Learn more about the adaptable, carnivorous cormorant not at home around the Chesapeake Bay. 

On this episode of The Weekly Reader, we review a pair of new novels that redefine the concept of a "quiet" retirement.

First time homebuyers, executive compensation, job openings, globalization and the possibility of recession. 

Titanic

Apr 5, 2018

William and Lucy Carter were just two of the passengers on the ill-fated, maiden voyage of the "unsinkable" Titanic in the early hours of April 15, 1912. Traveling first class, they survived the disaster, though their marriage did not.

Rosemary

Apr 5, 2018

It was on the cold morning of February 3, 1964 when the wrecker’s ball smashed into the south wall of Ford’s theater, between Eutaw and Howard streets, where it had stood since 1871. A pile of rubble was all that was left of the grand store house of theater memories. Later that morning, two elderly ladies, could be seen sprinkling on the debris what was later reported to be rosemary. One of the ladies was heard to say, “As Ophelia said in Hamlet, ‘Here’s rosemary, for remembrance.’” The ladies remarked that it was a cold morning. For Baltimore theater goers it was a very cold day. 

Stephen Towns

Apr 5, 2018
Joseph Hyde

Christopher Bedford talks with Baltimore-based artist Stephen Towns about his first museum exhibition, Rumination and a Reckoning, and his choice to use quilting as a medium to narrate the life of Nat Turner and his 1831 rebellion. Towns is also a Sondheim Artscape Prize Finalist whose work will be on view in another exhibition at the BMA June 20 – August 5.

Jacob Hsu

Apr 5, 2018
Jacob Hsu/Linked In

This week's guest: Jacob Hsu from Catalyte, a software development firm.

Pages