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WYPR Features

Kim Schatzel

Apr 6, 2017

On this week's Why Baltimore, Towson University President Kim Schatzel discusses what makes the Baltimore region so unique. 

ladycake711/flickr

Many people are frustrated by the idea of having to work longer than they would like. Our Golden Years are supposed to be about leisurely walks on the beach or 18 holes of golf, not about turning wrenches or entering data. Of course, many people are induced into working extra years for financial reasons. But there are other reasons to work, including personal fulfillment and your health.  

Anirban has more. 


Anyone can pop the cork on a Napa cab or a white burgundy.  But there are a lot of pleasures to be had if you allow yourself to stray off the beaten path.  Al has a few suggestions to help you get pleasantly lost.

Click on the picture for the full wine list. 

Tom Pelton

 

With President Trump proposing to defund and dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency, I thought I’d take a look at a bigger question: Why do we even need environmental regulations?

So I took a trip to the site of the worst environmental disaster in the history of the Chesapeake Bay: Hopewell, Virginia.

There, outside what is now a weedy lot beside a NAPA Auto repair shop at 501 East Randolph Street, back in 1974 and 1975 stood a small three-story building where a company called Life Sciences Products manufactured an insecticide, kepone.

The owners of Life Sciences had a financial incentive to rapidly manufacture 1.7 million pounds of this roach and ant-killing poison for a larger company, Allied Chemical.  Workers earning about $3.75 did not wear masks or gloves, and were told not to worry about the odorless white powder that coated their faces, clothes, and sandwiches at lunch.


Click here for the book information.  

Matt Acevedo/flickr

Perhaps you’ve lived through the following situation – an acquaintance tells you that a common friend, perhaps someone you went to school with or once worked alongside, is now making a lot of money. You ask, well where do they live? They say New York, and you say, well then they’re really not making that much are they?  

Anirban has more. 

Food insecurity

Apr 5, 2017

Food insecurity touches one in six children in our nation. It’s a problem that will affect them into adulthood.

A Green Kitchen

Apr 4, 2017
A Blue View

When looking to make a positive conservation impact, start in the heart of your home. Your kitchen is full of opportunities for going greener. Here are some simple suggestions. 

Erich Ferdinand/flickr

Men are in decline. That seems like a strange thing to say when one considers that last year, nearly 96 percent of all Fortune 500 CEOs were male. But on the other end of the spectrum, men are dropping out of the labor force in large numbers and falling behind women in terms of both college attendance and graduation rates.

Anirban has more on this story.


Reward Vs. Likelihood

Apr 4, 2017
Seth Sawyers/flickr

We know that students who attend school regularly are more likely to graduate from high school, but imagine you are one of Baltimore’s young people who wakes up every morning faced with difficult decisions– will I go to school or do I have to watch a younger sibling so mom can go to work or maybe I have to go to work myself? It’s a tough choice. 

Sarah Hemminger, Thread co-founder and Chief Executive Officer has more on how a young person's brain evaluates reward and likelihood. 


Salsas

Apr 4, 2017

One of the things we do really well in Maryland is peppers.  Our soil and climate are perfect for the entire range of peppers, from the mildest to the hottest.

One of Jerry Pellegrino's favorite thing to do with peppers is to whip up some of the classic Mexican salsas.  Here are a few of his favorite.  Some of these ingredients can be found in the Latino bodegas that a scattered around town.

Click here for salsa recipes from Chefs Amy von Lange & Jerry Pellegrino.

Pillbugs

Apr 4, 2017
Michel Vuijlsteke/flickr

I recently had the chance to join some of the students from the Nature Preschool at Irvine on an early spring walk. It was beautiful out, and we stopped near some decomposing tree stumps to look for insects. The quietest boy in the class suddenly got really animated, and all the students gathered around to see what he had found.

I joined in on the enthusiasm, peering over the heads of many murmuring and excited kids. The little boy gently opened his hand to reveal a tiny, grayish-brown pillbug. As if on cue, and a little like magic, the pillbug froze, then curled up into a perfectly round ball. The students cheered!

reynermedia/flickr

This week on ClearPath, we look at job changers and retirement options. If those job changers have been saving for retirement at the workplace they have to decide what to do with their retirement assets. Catherine guides us through some of their choices. 

Katherine Seery/flickr

A new working paper published by The National Bureau of Economic Research indicates that there are double standards in the nation’s financial advisory industry when it comes to disciplining men versus women. The paper is entitled “When Harry Fired Sally: The Double Standard in Punishing Misconduct."

Anirban has more on this story. 


Dr. Leana Wen

Mar 31, 2017

Tom talks with Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen.

Dr. Wen is recommending:

Organ Grinders

Mar 31, 2017
Maryland Historical Society

Up through the 1940s Baltimoreans knew it was spring when they saw the organ grinders and their monkeys appear suddenly on the street corners of downtown. One such organ grinder was Luciano Ibolito, and his monkey’s name was Julia. And this is the story of how together they would usher spring in Baltimore.

Kathryn Decker/flickr

There was a time several years ago when the job market was flooded with eager applicants. Many people had lost their jobs, unemployment was elevated, and large numbers of college graduates added to the volume of job seekers. As indicated by Bloomberg, during and after the recession, many employers began requiring college degrees for entry level jobs. That was then, this is now.

Anirban has more.


Age Discrimination

Mar 30, 2017

Given the financial strains being placed on programs like Social Security and Medicare and slow labor force growth in recent years, policymakers have increasingly been focused on inducing people to work longer and retire later. Economic research published by the San Francisco Fed indicates that efforts to expand the ratio of older workers in the workforce are being frustrated by discrimination against older workers – older women in particular. 

Anirban has more. 


The History of Work in Kent County

Mar 30, 2017

Nina Johnson, executive director of Sumner Hall in Chestertown tells us about the history of work in Kent County.

Sumner Hall is one of five sites in Maryland that will host The Way We Worked, a Smithsonian Institution Museum on Main Street traveling exhibition. The exhibit will be at Sumner Hall through May 19, 2017.

Mike Subelsky

Mar 30, 2017
Twitter

Mike Subelsky, chief technology officer for Staq on why Baltimore was the perfect city to help him start global software companies.

James Tipton/flickr

Recent data from the Job Opportunities and Labor Turnover Survey or JOLTS indicate that the U.S. labor market continues to strengthen. Though the JOLTS report is a month behind the highly publicized monthly employment report supplied by the Labor Department, it is still followed by economists because of the additional insights it provides. The most recent report indicates that both the rate of hiring and quitting jobs rose in early 2017.  

Anirban has more. 


Did you ever cram for an exam?  It was probably not a successful way to learn. But babies are learning incredible amounts very quickly. Find out how!

"Avalon"

Mar 29, 2017

The story of the founding of the Maryland colony in 1632 by Cecil Calvert, which followed a failed attempt by his father, George Calvert, to start another colony in 1620 called Avalon. 

Click here for book information. 

The Toronto Star

President Trump recently proposed to eliminate all federal funding for the Chesapeake Bay cleanup program, reducing appropriations from $73 million a year down to zero.

His budget, which must still be approved by Congress, is part of a bigger plan to slash the funding and power of the Environmental Protection Agency.  Trump has proposed cutting EPA’s budget by 31 percent nationally, eliminating 3,200 positions, and terminating 50 programs nationally, including not only the Chesapeake Bay Program but also the Great Lakes restoration.

First Whites of Spring

Mar 29, 2017

The daffodils are in bloom, there's bird song in the air, and the first crisp fresh white wines of spring are just begging to be tasted. Al has a set of wines that are perfect for the season.

Click here for the full list. 

WalrusWaltz/flickr

There has been considerable discussion in recent months about the role of immigrants in American society.  Some of this discussion may have made people wonder if the U.S. is as open to people from other parts of the world as it once was. Apparently, many people, including students, have come to the conclusion that America has, at least for now, become a less desirable destination.

Anirban has more. 


Desiree Litchford/flickr

I happen to be as patriotic as the next guy, but even I am forced to admit there are certain things the French do better than just about anybody else.  Perfume, champagne and truffles come to mind... and so do French pastries. Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School agrees.   He has had a number of French guests come into his school lately, and he has learned a thing or two.  Here are three recipes that will challenge you, but give you impressive results. 

Click here for unique French pastry recipes from Chefs Amy von Lange & Jerry Pellegrino.

VIRGINIA STATE PARKS

 

Just imagine this.

There. At the bottom of the river.

There’s a 7-and-½-foot-long, 170-pound, armor-covered behemoth. Its brown, sandpaper-like hide has sharp bony plates along its back. Its fins are large, and its tail is just like a shark’s. And its dark eyes regard you suspiciously as it flexes its blubbery, sucker mouth and the catfish-like whiskers on its chin. The giant prehistoric-looking animal uses its snout to root around the sandy Chesapeake Bay bottom before lumbering away.

Jellyfish

Mar 28, 2017
The National Aquarium

Mysterious, misunderstood jellyfish are swimming right in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Let's take a look at what their presence indicates and how climate change is playing a role. 

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