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WYPR Features

AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

There are few things more precious than the relationship between a boy and his mother.

It appears that relationship between Shaquille O’Neal and his mother, Lucille, may be enough to nip a bizarre feud in the bud.

Jayne Miller

Feb 24, 2017

Tom talks with WBAL TV’s Jayne Miller.

msa.maryland.gov

Ethel Ennis,  the Baltimore vocalist with the buttery-soft voice, was born in Baltimore but enjoyed international renown performing in London and Paris and cities around the world—and received many tempting invites to live in any one of them. Yet she chose to come home to live and work in Baltimore. She explained, “You don’t have to move up by moving on. You can bloom where you were planted.” And so she did.

Crossing Barriers, Building Relationships

Feb 24, 2017
Bge.com

Sarah Hemminger on the need to form relationships between Baltimoreans and how "TouchPoint Baltimore" seeks to break down barriers.

Ian Belknap

Feb 23, 2017
Ian Belknap Twitter

What do Malcom X and Julius Caesar have in common? Ian Belknap, Artistic Director for The Acting Company explains. 

Russell Snyder

Feb 23, 2017

Today's guest is Russell Snyder, President & CEO of Volunteers of America Chesapeake. He tells us about the accomplishments and the future plans for the VAC's Baltimore Re-entry Center.

Karen/flickr

When many of us were growing up, it was quite customary for someone to be on strike. Over time, the strike or work stoppage has become a rarely used instrument for labor unions to extract better treatment from employers or higher levels of compensation. According to data recently made available by the U.S. Labor Department, fewer major work stoppages occurred over the past ten years than occurred each year from 1947 to 1981.

Elyce Feliz/flickr

Data seemingly indicate that many people are resigned to the notion that their retirement income will largely come from Social Security. For instance, a recent study by the non-partisan US Government Accountability Office or GAO indicates that as many as half of all households with Americans 55 years old or older have no retirement savings at all.

Maryland Winter Wine Event

Feb 22, 2017
Jon Connell/flickr

Al visited the annual Maryland Winter Wine Gala and had a chance to taste the very best wines from the Free State.  He was impressed by the quality and provided this list of highlights.

EPA Chesapeake Bay Program

The Chesapeake Bay defines Maryland geographically, historically and culturally.  And for millennia, what defined the Chesapeake Bay were oysters. The shellfish were not only an important food for people -- but, more importantly, they were the ecological cornerstone of the living bay, filtering and cleaning the bay’s waters; providing a home for blue crabs, fish and countless other species; and building reefs that were the necessary foundation for the reproduction of more life.

After the Civil War, however, watermen began ripping the lungs out of the bay by using ships to drag heavy metal rakes with bags across the bottom.  By 1891, Maryland’s oyster commissioner, Dr. William K. Brooks, began raising alarms that the bay’s seafood industry was not sustainable.

“Everywhere, in France, in Germany, in England, in Canada, and in all northern coast states [of the United States,] history tells the same story,” Brooks wrote.  “In all waters where oysters are found at all, they are usually found in abundance. And in all of these places the residents supposed that their natural beds were inexhaustible until they suddenly found that they were exhausted.”

What if just one year could change your life? It can. If it happens at an early age.

Jo Sau/flickr

There has certainly been much concern expressed about the declining economic circumstances of American men in recent decades. But American men are hardly alone in facing adversity. The Resolution Foundation, a British think tank, has published new research indicating that British men born between 1981 and 2000 will earn $12,500 pounds less in their twenties than Generation X men.

Smabs Sputzer/flickr

I was making the rounds at my local farmers market last week, looking for something off the beaten path in the meat department. I stopped by Woolsey Farm's stand, famous for their excellent lamb, and it hit me. I could get a pound or two of ground lamb and see what I could do with it.  

Lamb and beef are mostly interchangeable, but there are differences. Lamb's flavor is quite distinct from beef, so a lamb cheeseburger might not exactly hit the same spot. But ground lamb is nothing if not versatile, and it does open up doors to more exotic culinary traditions. 

Climate Change

Feb 21, 2017
The National Aquarium

With 2016 on the books as the hottest year on record after a string of increasingly warm years, let’s take a look at the simple things that each of us can do every day to make a positive difference in the fight against climate change. 

David Slater/flickr

On my drive into the office last Monday, I saw one of my favorite misunderstood native creatures. It was the first thing in the morning, and a large brown-black bird was standing on the roadside with enormous, outstretched wings. It looked like a white-tailed deer had been struck by a car the night before, as its lifeless body lay on the road’s shoulder. I slowed as I passed, and the bird’s featherless, leathery red head followed me as I rolled by.

A Dynamic Economy?

Feb 20, 2017
Michael Daddino/flickr

We economists could easily make the case that America’s economy is in fine shape. Jobs are being created, unemployment is low, wages are rising faster than inflation, which remains contained, and national output remains ascendant. But while economists express such views, our fellow countrymen and women don’t seem to be buying it.

"Ascendant" Baltimore

Feb 20, 2017
tedstake.monumentalsportsnetwork.com

Under the category of “It’s always nice to be wanted,” that was a really sweet civic kiss that Ted Leonsis threw at Charm City on the front of the local newspaper Sunday.

Leonsis, who owns the indoor sports teams in Washington and the arena they play in, called Baltimore "ascendant" in The Baltimore Sun, to explain why he bought two Arena Football League teams and placed one at Royal Farms Arena.

Indeed, Leonsis said that while people think it’s crazy for him to own both the Washington Valor and the Baltimore Brigade, he thinks the Brigade can stimulate Royal Farms Arena, create jobs and bring people into downtown.

Mark Hillary/flickr

On today's episode, Hector gives a few more insights from a TransAmerica survey, focusing on the 11 percent of Americans who are uninsured.

Defining the Salad

Feb 19, 2017
Jeremy Keith/flickr

In this week's episode, Tony and Chef Wolf define what makes a salad, give a tutorial on how to make a basic vinaigrette and mayonnaise, and share what wines to pair with salad. And stay tuned for a Chef's salad challenge.

Judson Mills

Feb 17, 2017

In today's episode of In the BromoTom talks with Judson Mills who stars in The Bodyguard: The Musical at the Hippodrome Theater, February 28-March 5, 2017.

The Rise in Contract Employees

Feb 17, 2017
Kathryn Decker/flickr

Even as hiring activity remains brisk and more firms spend resources training employees, many American companies are activity planning to hire fewer people in the future. As indicated by writer Lauren Weber, the outsourcing wave that moved thousands of apparel manufacturing jobs to China and dozens of call center operations to India remains just as likely to happen within companies across the U.S. and in virtually every industry.

"Strawberry Time"

Feb 17, 2017
Ewan Traveler/flickr

Gil tells us about a time before WWII when strawberries were grown and picked by Baltimoreans.

Uncovering History in St. Mary’s County

Feb 16, 2017
smcm.edu

What can found oyster shells tell us about an area’s past inhabitants? Dr. Julia King, professor of anthropology at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, shares how she and her students are delving into the history of Secowocomoco, a farmland in St. Mary’s County in Southern Maryland.

Job Training

Feb 16, 2017
flickr

With the economy approaching completion of its eighth year of recovery, employers large and small are complaining that they can’t find workers with the right skill sets. Skilled workers in manufacturing, construction, logistics, finance, technology and other industries have been steadily scooped up as the economy has expanded. The result is that more businesses are now spending resources to train people to satisfactorily fill available job openings.

frankieleon/flickr

A piece published earlier this year by writer Dan Caplinger indicates what many of us know – the oldest members of the baby boom generation have now turned 70 and thousands reach standard retirement age each day. Rather than approaching retirement with enthusiasm, many boomers are simply terrified given the paucity of their savings and prospects of expensive needs registered during retirement. While boomers are likely to be more concerned about their retirement prospects than younger Americans, younger folks have reason to be concerned as well.

exeloncorp.com

Joining us today is Calvin Butler, CEO of Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE.) He shares how BGE's Smart Energy Workforce Development Program is preparing the energy industry's future workforce.

This episode originally aired on Oct. 13, 2016.

Trash Free Maryland

Styrofoam:  It’s in our coffee cups, fast-food containers, and even those annoying packaging peanuts that are so devilishly hard to sweep up after you open a box.

Unfortunately this foam – a petroleum product known as polystyrene – ends up littered all over roadsides in Baltimore and elsewhere—and is a persistent floating eyesore in the Chesapeake Bay.Legislation being debated this week in the Maryland General Assembly would ban foam food containers and packaging and instead push companies to use biodegradable alternatives, including paper products.

Job Growth

Feb 15, 2017
Jeremy Sternberg/flickr

Many economists have been indicating that the economy is approaching full employment. This doesn’t mean that the unemployment rate will soon be zero – it means that we are approaching a situation in which a tighter labor market will eventually translate into more inflation, which in turn will produce higher interest rates.

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