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WYPR Features

marylandtransitadministration.blogspot.com

On today's Baltimore Stories, Gil tells us about a transportation option that allowed riders to take in the "charms of Charm City" from a high perch.

Adam/flickr

The economic recovery that began in mid 2009 is at long last showing up more meaningfully in the paychecks of average Americans. The Labor Department recently reported that average hourly earnings have risen 2.9 percent over the past year – that’s the best annual performance since the economic recovery began seven and a half years ago.

Small Museums in Maryland

Jan 19, 2017
Lindsey Baker

This episode originally aired on June 25, 2015

From local history to living history, the arts to architecture, Maryland is host to hundreds of Museums statewide, many of which are small and led by teams of dedicated volunteers. Every Maryland County has a historical society, complimented by dozens of local historical groups.

According to a poll taken by the Maryland State Arts Council, 81% of Marylanders overwhelmingly agree that “a vibrant arts community makes Maryland a better place to live.” Additionally, 86% want Maryland to be known as a place where artists can become successful. Kwame Kwei-Armah, Creative Director of Center Stage joins us to discuss the growth of the theater and the cultural contributions of the arts.

GotCredit/flickr

Most people rely upon Social Security to at least a certain extent to pay for their retirement expenses.  According to US News, 84 percent of people qualify for Social Security payments and an easy majority of retirees, 60 percent, receive at least half of their income from Social Security. According to the Social Security Administration, Social Security is the only major source of retirement income for a third of retirees.

Don’t let cold weather stop your children from spending time outside. Contrary to what you may think, exposure to cold weather is beneficial to a little one’s health and development.

Tuscan Wines for Winter

Jan 18, 2017
žibuoklių jūra/flickr

Al and Hugh give their picks for the best Tuscan wines to drink this winter.

Examining the Economy

Jan 18, 2017
ChelseaViola/flickr

As of this moment, the U.S. economy seems to be in pretty decent shape. Odds of a near-term recession appear low. As reported by The Wall Street Journal, the economy has expanded for the past 11 quarters.  Hiring remains stable. Home prices have been rising. Private construction spending has been expanding. Consumer spending is up, particularly in the form of online sales. However, there were moments in 2016 when things didn’t look quite so good.

Artie Raslich/The New York Times

This week, my program is a musical one.   Here is a song by singer, songwriter, and environmentalist Sean Madden about the amazing and unexpected resilience of nature in the face of political turmoil and trouble.

Historydawg/flickr

Odds are good that a chickadee will visit your property this winter. Universally considered “cute,” the chubby little chickadee has an oversized round head, a short neck, a tiny body and a curiosity about everything, including humans. Its quickness in discovering bird feeders make it one of the first birds most of us learn.

Work-Related Injuries

Jan 17, 2017
Esther Max/flickr

In 2015, there were more than 4800 fatal work-related injuries in America not counting active members of the U.S. armed forces. As reported by CNBC, 10 industries in particular experienced the highest rates of death per 100 thousand workers. Most of these jobs are filled by men.

Fish That Make Sound

Jan 17, 2017
AQUA.ORG

This segment aired on Feb. 16, 2016

When you think of an animal that purrs, grunts, croaks or hums, I’ll bet it’s not a fish. But, I’ll let you in on a secret: More than 150 species of fish on the East Coast of the U.S. are what scientists call “somniferous.” They make noise. Lots of it.

Addressing Addiction in the City

Jan 17, 2017

Sarah Hemminger, Thread co-founder and Chief Executive Officer, comments on the relationship between environment, connection and addiction.

Oysters

Jan 17, 2017
Rebekah Apotre/flickr

In the bleak mid-winter I sometimes ponder the Chesapeake watermen who are out there dredging up oysters for our pleasure. It's tough life, but we're glad they do it, because a Chesapeake oyster is a wonderful thing.  And Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School, there's more to oysters than just shucking and slurping.

Men in the Workforce

Jan 16, 2017
M State/flickr

For much of the past decade, the labor market has arguably been friendlier to women seeking employment than men. That’s because the jobs that have been disappearing in large numbers, like machine operator, are predominantly male oriented while occupations that have been expanding, like health aide, mostly implicate women.

reynermedia/flickr

Greg Tucker and Catherine Collinson discuss the basics of workplace retirement savings.

bour3/flickr

Gil brings us the story of Sidney Friedman and his 1930s advertising campaign for The Chesapeake that dared Baltimoreans to "cut your steak with a fork or tear it up and walk out."

Richard Elzey/flickr

If you are driving right now, you might be able to spot a Ford F-150 pickup truck. In fact, you may be driving one. Since 1977, Ford has sold enough F-series trucks to circle the earth more than three times. As reported by CNN Money, the F-series has been America’s best-selling truck 40 consecutive years. Ford recently announced that it has sold more than 26 million units since the model line’s introduction. Analysts say that the F-series has become more popular due to cultural factors.

Joel McCord and Rachel Baye, WYPR's State House reporter, discuss the sharply partisan exchanges between Gov. Larry Hogan, Senate President Mike Miller and House Speaker Mike Busch.

Laura Wexler

Jan 12, 2017

Joining us today for Why Baltimore is Laura Wexler, co-founder and producer of The Stoop Storytelling Series. Wexler shares how Baltimore has contributed to the success of The Stoop.

Miranda Granche/flickr

Economists have suffered enormous difficulty trying to explain why productivity has failed to expand as rapidly as it has in the past. A recent report supplied by the polling company Gallup singles out anti-competitive and wasteful practices by teachers unions, associations of physicians, universities and local governments. Researchers tracked health, education and housing costs from 1980 to 2014. They find that the combined spending in these three areas rose from 25 percent to 40 percent of GDP since 1980 without commensurate improvements in quality.

401(K) 2012/flickr

A US News article identifies 10 major retirement blunders.  Here they are. 

#1 – not having a plan for your money once you retire. Many people prepare for retirement, and then don’t take steps to manage their cash flow during it.

#2 – forgetting about inflation while you are making your plans. 

#3 – failing to save enough money for retirement – ok, that one is obvious.

The Work of William Christenberry

Jan 12, 2017

On today's Humanities Connection, Kimberly Gladfelter Graham, curator of the exhibit "Laying-by Time: Revisiting the Works of William Christenberry" at the Maryland Institute College of Art, tells us about Christenberry's artistry and vision.  

The Maryland General Assembly’s annual session opens today in Annapolis.  By far the most important environmental issue that lawmakers will be debating over the next three months is a proposed ban on hydraulic fracturing for natural gas.

Fracking and horizontal drilling techniques have transformed rural parts of neighboring Pennsylvania and West Virginia into oil and gas industrial zones over the last decade.  But Western Maryland, which has the same gas-rich shale rock formations, has not yet experienced any fracking.

Lawmakers in 2015 passed a two-year moratorium on the high-pressure injection of water and chemicals into shale formations to release natural gas. But that moratorium on fracking will run out in October, and then the drilling could start here in Maryland if state legislators fail to act this winter.


There are alternatives to suspension and expulsion. Especially when it comes to very young children. Listen to find out more.

Winter Beers

Jan 11, 2017

Recommendations 

Bellhaven "Wee 90" Scottish Ale ***

(Dark, rich, lively, complex, very malty, excellent)

McEwan's Scottish Ale **1/2

(Warm and comfortable, a cozy brew for chilly weather)

Harviestoun "Old Engine Oil" Black Ale **

(Dark, thick and tasty, but not terribly heavy)

Heavy Seas "21" Anniversary ale, Imperial Rye ESB (pint bottle)

(Unique, robust, rye influence, high in ABV but supple)

Fuller's ESB   **1/2

(All about sweet malt flavors in a full bodied format)

Education Deserts

Jan 11, 2017
anah1ta/flickr

In Baltimore and in many other communities, it is common for people to identify and speak of food deserts – places where it is challenging for residents to purchase nutritious food. According to the Urban Institute, there are also education deserts – places that are many miles away from a community college or other places where one can obtain needed skills training.

Children and Income

Jan 10, 2017
Jon Grainger/flickr

A recent study by the public policy organization, Demos, indicates that the financial burden of having young children can substantially reduce a family’s income and increase its chances of falling into poverty.

The Dumbo Octopus

Jan 10, 2017
OCEAN.SI.EDU

In the vast midwaters of the open ocean, there’s an animal so adorable that the Smithsonian Institution’s website said, "If this video doesn't inspire a whole cadre of budding teuthologists, we don't know what will." Any amateur teuthologists out there want to hazard a guess as to what group of animals they’re referring? Here’s a hint: teuthology is the study of squids and octopuses.

Chet Burrell 1/10/17

Jan 10, 2017

Chet Burrell became President and Chief Executive Officer of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield in December 2007.

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