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WYPR Features

Catonsville Nine 50th Anniversary

Apr 5, 2018

In 1968, activists in our own backyard protested the Vietnam War in a way that would become a landmark in our nation’s history of civil disobedience. 2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Catonsville Nine. Joby Taylor, Director of the Shriver Peaceworkers Fellows Program at UMBC, tells us more about the historic events in Maryland and plans to acknowledge their impact.

There continues to be much discussion regarding America’s retirement crisis. Far too many people lack adequate retirement savings, and face diminished living standards once they stop working. In response, there has been a move toward automatic enrollment in employer-sponsored retirement plans.

Chablis

Apr 4, 2018
Lee Coursey/flickr

Al and Hugh give their picks for some notable chablis. 

Childhood brain development has been the focus of much study over the last few decades. Childhood moral development, on the other hand, has received significantly less attention. Until now.

If the word “essay” doesn’t trigger panic attacks and terrible memories of high school or college exams, have we got a pair of books for you! On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we feature new work from Tim Kreider and Carina Chocano.

A Child’s Hopes Realized

Apr 4, 2018

April is Autism Awareness Month where we honor and recognize the millions of children, families and individuals around the world who are impacted by autism.

Union of Concerned Scientists

On Monday, the Trump Administration announced that it will be eliminating air pollution control standards for cars and trucks imposed six years ago that would have required a doubling in the fuel efficiency of vehicles by 2025.

This could mean larger gas-guzzlers on our roads. The President’s rationale for this and other recent regulatory rollbacks is his claim that environmental rules hurt the economy.

“Let’s cut the red tape,” President Trump said.  “Let’s set free our dreams, and yes, let’s make America great again. And one of the ways we’re going to do that is by getting rid of a lot of unnecessary regulation.”

This argument clashes with the historical record, which shows that auto makers enjoyed record-setting sales in 2016 and 2015 even under tighter fuel-efficiency standards imposed by the Obama Administration in 2012.

Greening Baltimore

Apr 3, 2018
Michael Busada

Will Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation discusses a partnership between the CBF and Baltimore City to add more green space in Baltimore through 90 projects in over 30 neighborhoods. 

Gemma Billings/flickr

At long last the moment is at hand, the culinary equivalent of baseball's Opening Day.  This coming weekend will mark the return of the Baltimore Farmers Market under the old JFX.  And for Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School, this means that his cooking classes will have a lot of great local food to work with.

The National Aquarium

Red-eared slider turtles are native to the mid- and south-central United States, so what are they doing swimming in the tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay?

Catherine helps us explore what it takes to successfully retire ahead of the 65 year mark.  

Black Aggie

Apr 2, 2018

On a moonless night in 1938, a Hopkins undergrad was taken on a fraternity initiation—a teen-age ritual through the 1960s, a visit to see “Black Aggie.””Aggie” was a bronze statue, weather-darkened hence the “black” description, created to honor a well- known Baltimorean, Felix Angus. “Aggie” stood dark and mysterious in the Druid Ridge Cemetery at Stevenson Road and Park Heights Avenues. The sculptor was Augustus Saint Gaudin—who started out to create a beautiful statue, but through years of visits by teenagers to his dark statue on a dark nights in a darkened cemetery--wound up changing the pop culture of Baltimore.

One of the many perks of being the Executive Director of a nature center is my proximity to the front line of the battle against invasive species in our region. As our human world becomes ever-more connected, the creatures we share our planet with like sometimes like to join us for the ride. Unfortunately, when new species are introduced to our shores, they often have a devastating impact on our native flora and fauna. Such is the case with the Spotted Lanternfly, an invasive insect that arrived in Pennsylvania in 2014.

Automation, American tourism, credit card debt, bricklayer job security, and working mothers. 

"She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her." - This is the text of a Gestapo transmission regarding OSS agent Virginia Hall, a Baltimore native who fought with the Resistance in France during World War II. This is her remarkable story.

Black Aggie

Mar 30, 2018

On a moonless night in 1938, a Hopkins undergrad was taken on a fraternity initiation—a teen-age ritual through the 1960s, a visit to see “Black Aggie.””Aggie” was a bronze statue, weather-darkened hence the “black” description, created to honor a well- known Baltimorean, Felix Angus. “Aggie” stood dark and mysterious in the Druid Ridge Cemetery at Stevenson Road and Park Heights Avenues. The sculptor was Augustus Saint Gaudin—who started out to create a beautiful statue, but through years of visits by teenagers to his dark statue on a dark nights in a darkened cemetery--wound up changing the pop culture of Baltimore.

A Message of Gratitude

Mar 29, 2018

Maryland Humanities Executive Director Phoebe Stein joins us with a message of gratitude and an exciting announcement regarding our Humanities Connection segment.

Earlier this year, it appeared that something quite rare was about to occur.  One of the fifty U.S. states, Washington State, was striving to pass a bill that would have instituted a new payroll tax to help cover the cost of long term care, whether in a nursing home, a residence, or elsewhere in a community.

Today's guest is Kimberly Groves, President and CEO of KCW Engineering.

Black Aggie

Mar 29, 2018

Dr. Morgan Pritchett and his cemetery experience with "Black Aggie" as part of his fraternity initiation.

Baltimore Waterfront Partnership

Mr. Trash Wheel is a water-driven trash-interceptor and collection machine that was installed four years ago at the mouth of the Jones Falls, where it empties into Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

It was invented by Baltimore entrepreneur John Kellett and has succeeded in collecting more than 1.5 million pounds of garbage over the years. It has also collected a large social media following, with 30,000 followers on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

ACEs & Latino Kids

Mar 28, 2018

A report from the nonprofit Salud America! shows that eight-in-ten or 78% of all Latino children in America have faced at least one Averse Childhood Experience. This is the fastest growing demographic in America. What can be done to change this trend?

Wetlands (Encore)

Mar 27, 2018

The National Aquarium is getting serious about Inner Harbor water quality. Listen to learn more about how ingeniously designed floating wetlands are bringing natural habitat—and cleaner urban waters—back to Baltimore.

Visitors to Assateague Island have seen the beautiful ponies that roam free. Even those who have not had the benefit of visiting these creatures in person have likely read Margarite Henry’s book, "Misty of Chincoteague."

But the differently-named ponies--Assateague and Chincoteague--present some confusion.  Are they the same ponies? Different ponies? Do they even live on the same island?

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

Hector tells us how employers can best implement workplace wellness programs.

Flickr/Jeannette E. Spaghetti

Maryland's farms are just about ready to start cranking out good fresh food this spring, and very quickly we're going to be washed away in a food avalanche. Since we can't possibly eat everything we'd like to buy, we have to have a plan B. There's no better expert than Chef JP of Schola Cooking School, and he says it's never to early to start thinking about preserving the bounty.

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, two books that take us behind the scenes at a pair of workplaces that might make you want to keep your day job.

This week: Job growth, mortgage rates, government spending, and the success of Black Panther

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Freeman Hrabowski, President of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) tells us about the contributions of UMBC's alumni.

Dr. Sheri Parks

Mar 22, 2018

Tom talks with University of Maryland Professor Dr. Sheri Parks.

Sheri is recommending:

Digging to America by Anne Tyler

In the Midst of Winter, by Isabel Allende

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