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WYPR Features

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One of the most polarizing issues in America is illegal immigration. While some insist upon a nation of laws firmly enforced, others favor a more relaxed approach. Economists are also divided, but there are certainly many who believe that if America were to lose vast numbers of illegal workers, the nation’s economy would suffer.  

Anirban has more of this story. 


Danny's

Mar 10, 2017
Maryland Fisheries Service/DNR

Motorists driving north on Charles during March of 1989 were delighted to see, off to their right, high on the two story building at Biddle, a sign, “The Run Is On!” That sign appearing in late March every year was cheering: a favorite Baltimore dish was again available at Danny’s Restaurant—boneless shad and shad roe. But Danny’s is closed, there is no longer public notice that it’s shad season in Baltimore.

Dan Fuccella/flickr

One of the greatest fears of workers is their potential to be replaced by technology. Many of us have already been forced to shift jobs due to automation. As pointed out by writer Binyamin Appelbaum, in 1900, factories and farms employed 60 percent of the nation’s workforce. By 1950, those two sectors employed about 36 percent of the workforce -- by 2014, less than 10 percent of worked in a factory or on a farm.  

Anirban has the rest of this story. 


Preserving the Past

Mar 9, 2017
MARMIA

Siobhan Hagan, president and CEO of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Moving Image Archive tells us about the value of audio-visual preservation.

Russell Hill

Mar 9, 2017

Joining us for today's "Why Baltimore" is Russell Hill, director and professor at The Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology.

Economic Growth

Mar 9, 2017
Jon Welsh/flickr

Last year, the U.S. economy expanded 1.6 percent. During last year’s final quarter, the economy expanded at a 1.9 percent annualized rate and growth is actually not expected to pick up significantly during the current quarter. So much of the talk about faster U.S. economic growth is largely speculative. In this context, one could ask the question, just how much faster could the U.S. economy grow?  

Anirban has more on this story. 


Mr Ehater/flickr

According to new research conducted by the Census Bureau, fewer than one-third of Americans are saving money in the 401k and other workplace retirement accounts. This research is based on an analysis of tax records. This is shocking since nearly 80 percent of Americans work for an employer that offers retirement programs, whether a 401K or a 403B or something else. Only 32 percent of workers sign up for such accounts.  

Anirban has the rest of the story. 


"Mary Clocker"

Mar 9, 2017

In 1638, fourteen year old Mary Lawn sailed to America in search of a better life, beating the odds time and again in the rough and tumble world of colonial Maryland.  

Book information

Tom Pelton

Last week, more than a thousand activists marched down Main Street in Annapolis, then paraded in a circle around the State House, chanting, cheering, and waving signs reading “Don’t Frack Maryland.” 

Even bagpipers joined the protest, with their wailing adding a militant sound to the protesters, two of whom wore skull masks and costumes that made them look like devilish oil rigs.

The people were voicing their support for a bill that would have Maryland lawmakers permanently ban hydraulic fracturing for natural gas in the state.

Two years ago, Maryland imposed a temporary moratorium on the high-pressure injection of water and chemicals into shale rock to release gas. But that moratorium will expire in October, and fracking and drilling will likely begin in Western Maryland after that if lawmakers do not act this spring.


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