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WYPR Features

charlie holzhausen

There are a lot of Baby Boomers and members of Generation X who like to complain about Millennials – who represent the youngest members of the U.S. workforce. Those of us from older generations complain about their seemingly insatiable appetite for flex time and for positive feedback regardless of the quality of their work. They also don’t seem to cherish the things that we cherished, like television. 

Anirban has more on this story.


Joe Howard

Mar 24, 2017
http://msa.maryland.gov

On December 2, 1968, in the Baltimore City Courthouse, Joseph Howard, the very first African American ever to be elected to a 15-year-term as a judge serving on the Supreme Bench of Baltimore, was being sworn in. But before the afternoon was over, the newly appointed judge would have an experience that as a Judge he did not expect.

As spring draws near it's time to break out the pinot noirs, the perfect red wine for a transitional season.  Hugh reviews new releases from one of his favorite California wineries.

Click here for the full list. 

Kevin Conklin

Mar 24, 2017

Kevin Conklin, vice president of operations for PANDORA Jewelry on why Baltimore was a front-runner for Pandora's relocation.

Aranami/flickr

Economic data has been pretty upbeat since last year’s presidential election. There is evidence of stepped up business investment, more rapid hiring, and more confidence among investors. In response, many economists have raised their forecasts for near-term economic growth and inflation.  

Anirban has more. 


Savings Behavior

Mar 23, 2017
Philip Brewer/flickr

People expect to live longer these days, and available evidence suggests that that has begun to impact their savings behavior. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the American lifespan now averages nearly 79 years. As reported by CNBC, a recent analysis of data by Ascensus pulled from more than 4,000 employer-sponsored retirement plans points to a number of emerging trends. 

Anirban has more. 


The Washington Post

It was one of the most stunning reversals in Maryland political history.  On the campaign trail, Governor Larry Hogan praised hydraulic fracturing for natural gas as a potential economic gold mine for the state. And, once in office, the Republican proposed regulations that would have allowed fracking for the first time in Maryland, although the rules were put on hold by Democratic lawmakers.

But then, unexpectedly on Friday, Hogan called a press conference in Annapolis to suddenly announce that he was supporting a bill that would permanently outlaw fracking in the state.  His endorsement positions Maryland to become the first state in the U.S. with rock formations containing natural gas to legislatively ban fracking, which has been linked to air and water pollution and higher rates of asthma attacks and premature births.

Governor Hogan said: “Because the legislature has failed to enact our tough regulations, and because there is now a move by the senate president to allow for fracking, today I have decided to announce my full support for the Maryland fracking ban, which has been sponsored by Senator Bobby Zirkin of Baltimore County.” 

 

The Humanities Explore Fundamental Questions

Mar 22, 2017

Students who study the humanities as part of a well-rounded liberal arts education explore questions fundamental to the human existence. Who are we? Where have we been?

Oscar Ucho/flickr

Economists are ubiquitous in the world of public policy. As pointed out by writer Neil Irwin, walk half a block in downtown Washington, for instance, and there is a good chance you will pass an economist. Turn on cable news, and you will find an abundance of economists, often ones who serve a chief economist function for some organization of note.  

Anirban has more. 


Urban Conservation

Mar 22, 2017
NATIONAL AQUARIUM/FLICKR

John and Curtis Bennett, Conservation Project Manager at the National Aquarium discuss urban conservation efforts. 

This segment originally aired on Jan. 3, 2017.

Creative Commons

The year is 1929. Baltimore is sharing in the good life of the Roaring Twenties, until October 29, when the stock market crashed and the lights went out. The day marked the beginning of a decade known as the Great Depression. Author Gil Sandler narrates a history he wrote of the Great Depression, as it was lived out in Baltimore.

They were years of sorrow for white and black, young and old, rich and poor. One out of four were out of a job and couldn’t find one.. Paychecks stopped, as did payments of rent and mortgages. Families were evicted from their homes. Money to buy groceries was scarce. Banks failed; some shut their doors forever, taking with them the life savings of depositors.

Though times were dark, people found ways to get through them. And survive them. 

Gil tells this history with small stories that made up the big story-- through to the end of the Depression era in the late 1930s.In the end, you will hear how the Great Depression of the 1930s has affected our lives profoundly—down to today.

Anti-bias education builds self-awareness and confidence in young children. It teaches them to celebrate the differences that make our country.

With St. Patrick's Day looming we thought it would be a good idea to help you think past corned beef and cabbage and take a fresh look at modern Irish cooking.  And as Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School says, it seems to be high time to re-calibrate our thinking.

So with that in mind, here are a few classic Irish recipes done up for modern tastes and techniques.

Click here for recipes. 

Lifestyles and Healthcare

Mar 21, 2017

Chet Burrell on how the way we live our lives affects the healthcare options we seek.

James Tipton/flickr

One of the emerging mysteries in the U.S. macroeconomy is the growing gap between the number of workers losing their jobs and the number applying for unemployment benefits. One would expect these things to move together. When one loses a job, it is perfectly natural for them to seek out unemployment benefits to bolster their spending power until they are able to secure replacement employment.

Anirban has more on this story.

frankieleon/flickr

According to the Government Office of Accounting 29% of households age 55 or over have no savings of pensions. Half of American households have no retirement savings. In today's episode of Clear Path, Catherine Collinson shares some retirement mistakes to avoid.

The Best Paying Jobs

Mar 20, 2017
apox apox/flickr

Money isn’t everything, and yet people often rank job quality based on how much the typical person makes in a given occupational category. Career website Glassdoor recently ranked the 25 best paying jobs in America.  The Glassdoor report is based on an analysis of salaries Glassdoor users entered on the site during the one year period ending in February 2017. 

Anirban has more on the best paid positions. 


Salamanders

Mar 20, 2017
marylandbiodiversity.com

One of the more peculiar native animals in our listening area seems like it could have come from the inspired imagination of a Hollywood director.

This segment originally aired on March 17, 2015.

For many young people, it’s time for spring break – so the last thing one should talk about is bad grades. But that’s precisely what U.S. infrastructure received during the most recent assessment supplied by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Every four years, the Society publishes an analysis regarding the capabilities of American infrastructure, including the nation’s seaports, airports, water systems and roads. American infrastructure received a grade of D+, unchanged from its last report card delivered in 2013.  

Here's more from Anirban.


Artis Olds

Mar 17, 2017

Tom talks with Artis Olds who performs in Stomp at the Hippodrome Theater, March 18 & 19, 2017.

Learn more about the Bromo Arts and Entertainment District. 

The Moon Is Blue

Mar 17, 2017

On the afternoon of July 11, 1953, the Chairman of the Maryland Board of Movie Censors emerged from the viewing room, the fifth floor of the Equitable Building on Calvert Street, and made an announcement that shook the town: the Board would not allow the movie “The Moon Is Blue” to be shown. What happened next was historic.

Bridging the Divide

Mar 16, 2017

 

On March 29, following a four-part series from the Baltimore Sun, Maryland Humanities, Loyola University Maryland, and the Sun are hosting a community conversation on school segregation in Maryland. Sun Enterprise Editor Diana Sugg tells us about the recent history of segregation in our schools.

Caroline Popper

Mar 16, 2017

On today's episode of "Why Baltimore," Caroline Popper, CEO of Popper and Company,  describes why Baltimore is a prime location for her healthcare consulting firm.

liz west/flickr

American wealth is on the rise. Thanks primarily to a surging stock market during the final quarter of 2016, aggregate household wealth increased 2.3 percent to end at nearly $93 trillion. The value of household stock and mutual fund portfolios leapt by more than $700 billion during the fourth quarter. The value of homes rose by roughly another $560 billion.  

Anirban has more. 

Margaret/flickr

Perhaps lost among last year’s election cycle was the fact that there were some really strange dynamics at work in the U.S. labor market. Even as the population grew older, the participation rate, the measure of all adults who are working or looking for work – stabilized. As reported by Bloomberg, that bucked a long-lived downward trend and surprised many economists in the process. It turns out that the labor force participation rate stabilized in large measure because of people in their 60s.  

Anirban has more. 


On February 19, 1951, Joseph "Tunnel Joe" Holmes escaped from the Maryland State Penitentiary via a 70 foot long tunnel under the jail. 

Spanish Preview

Mar 15, 2017
David McSpadden/flickr

Al will be going to Spain later this spring, and he is boning up on some of the lesser known regions. For this week's program he is looking at Alicante, Jumilla, Bierzo, and Calatayud.

Click here for the complete wine list.

Cristine Jones/flickr

There has been considerable discussion recently about bringing high quality jobs back to America.  Many policies have been proposed, including a border adjustment tax and other mechanisms that would induce Americans to purchase more goods and services from one another.  But such mechanisms would generally not address structural shifts in how people are employed in America.  

Anirban has more of this story. 


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