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WYPR Features

Laura Wexler

Jan 12, 2017

Joining us today for Why Baltimore is Laura Wexler, co-founder and producer of The Stoop Storytelling Series. Wexler shares how Baltimore has contributed to the success of The Stoop.

Miranda Granche/flickr

Economists have suffered enormous difficulty trying to explain why productivity has failed to expand as rapidly as it has in the past. A recent report supplied by the polling company Gallup singles out anti-competitive and wasteful practices by teachers unions, associations of physicians, universities and local governments. Researchers tracked health, education and housing costs from 1980 to 2014. They find that the combined spending in these three areas rose from 25 percent to 40 percent of GDP since 1980 without commensurate improvements in quality.

401(K) 2012/flickr

A US News article identifies 10 major retirement blunders.  Here they are. 

#1 – not having a plan for your money once you retire. Many people prepare for retirement, and then don’t take steps to manage their cash flow during it.

#2 – forgetting about inflation while you are making your plans. 

#3 – failing to save enough money for retirement – ok, that one is obvious.

The Work of William Christenberry

Jan 12, 2017

On today's Humanities Connection, Kimberly Gladfelter Graham, curator of the exhibit "Laying-by Time: Revisiting the Works of William Christenberry" at the Maryland Institute College of Art, tells us about Christenberry's artistry and vision.  

The Maryland General Assembly’s annual session opens today in Annapolis.  By far the most important environmental issue that lawmakers will be debating over the next three months is a proposed ban on hydraulic fracturing for natural gas.

Fracking and horizontal drilling techniques have transformed rural parts of neighboring Pennsylvania and West Virginia into oil and gas industrial zones over the last decade.  But Western Maryland, which has the same gas-rich shale rock formations, has not yet experienced any fracking.

Lawmakers in 2015 passed a two-year moratorium on the high-pressure injection of water and chemicals into shale formations to release natural gas. But that moratorium on fracking will run out in October, and then the drilling could start here in Maryland if state legislators fail to act this winter.


There are alternatives to suspension and expulsion. Especially when it comes to very young children. Listen to find out more.

Winter Beers

Jan 11, 2017

Recommendations 

Bellhaven "Wee 90" Scottish Ale ***

(Dark, rich, lively, complex, very malty, excellent)

McEwan's Scottish Ale **1/2

(Warm and comfortable, a cozy brew for chilly weather)

Harviestoun "Old Engine Oil" Black Ale **

(Dark, thick and tasty, but not terribly heavy)

Heavy Seas "21" Anniversary ale, Imperial Rye ESB (pint bottle)

(Unique, robust, rye influence, high in ABV but supple)

Fuller's ESB   **1/2

(All about sweet malt flavors in a full bodied format)

Education Deserts

Jan 11, 2017
anah1ta/flickr

In Baltimore and in many other communities, it is common for people to identify and speak of food deserts – places where it is challenging for residents to purchase nutritious food. According to the Urban Institute, there are also education deserts – places that are many miles away from a community college or other places where one can obtain needed skills training.

Children and Income

Jan 10, 2017
Jon Grainger/flickr

A recent study by the public policy organization, Demos, indicates that the financial burden of having young children can substantially reduce a family’s income and increase its chances of falling into poverty.

The Dumbo Octopus

Jan 10, 2017
OCEAN.SI.EDU

In the vast midwaters of the open ocean, there’s an animal so adorable that the Smithsonian Institution’s website said, "If this video doesn't inspire a whole cadre of budding teuthologists, we don't know what will." Any amateur teuthologists out there want to hazard a guess as to what group of animals they’re referring? Here’s a hint: teuthology is the study of squids and octopuses.

Chet Burrell 1/10/17

Jan 10, 2017

Chet Burrell became President and Chief Executive Officer of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield in December 2007.

Alexandra MacKenzie/flickr

After brunch this Saturday, I was looking out the kitchen window while rinsing some dishes. Perching in a tree overlooking one of our bird feeders was a crow-sized hawk I hadn’t noticed before. From my vantage point, it appeared lightly colored in the front, with dark wings. I turned off the faucet to lean forward and get a closer look, when the hawk swooped into action. It flew toward the feeder, scattering visiting songbirds in all directions. A cardinal took off for the bushes and some house sparrows shot for the forest line.

Michelle Waltman/flickr

A couple weeks ago we resolved to eat more of the many alternative whole grains out there.  Turning away from standard starches like white potatoes and white rice, we are now more interested in some of the more obscure, but delicious grains.

My Colleges/flickr

As the new administration begins to take shape, there's a great deal of speculation among health policy experts about the potential alterations to our current health care system. Greg Tucker and Hector De La Torre discuss what plausible changes could be made to the Affordable Care Act.

Fraser Smith and John Lee, of the WYPR reporting team, talk about the upcoming review of Baltimore County's charter and what that could mean for county residents.

Fraser Smith and Andy Green, of the Baltimore Sun's editorial board, talk about how Gov. Larry Hogan reacts to the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump.

Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about the Christmas wish list newly inaugurated Mayor Catherine Pugh delivered to President-elect Donald Trump when he was in town for the Army-Navy game.

Fraser Smith and John Lee, of the WYPR news team, talk about Congressman Andy Harris' threat to withhold federal money from Baltimore County because of Executive Kevin Kamenetz's immigration stance.

Fraser Smith and Adam Bednar, who covers real estate for The Daily Record, talk about a residential building boom in downtown Baltimore.

Who's in? Who's out?

Nov 25, 2016

Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, WYPR's City Hall reporter, discuss the transition from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to Mayor-elect Catherine Pugh.

Fraser Smith and Karen Hosler, of the WYPR reporting team, talk about newly elected senator Chris Van Hollen's difficult assignment, cobbling together a Democratic majority in the Senate by 2018.

Not rigged

Nov 10, 2016
Tom Chalkley

WYPR's senior news analyst reminds us voting is a celebration of democracy threatened by claims of rigged outcomes and fraudulent campaigns to stop non-existent voter fraud.

Tom Chalkley

This contentious election may be getting you down, but WYPR's senior news analyst tells us we're surrounded by greatness. All we have to do is look around.

Fraser Smith and John Lee, of the WYPR reporting team, talk about what the presidential candidates aren't saying about climate change.

The mayoral election hasn't happened yet, but Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about transitions from William Donald Schaefer to Kurt Schmoke all the way to...Catherine Pugh?

Fraser Smith and Todd Eberly, of the political science faculty at St. Mary's College of Maryland, talk about GOP nominee Donald Trump's refusal to say whether he'll accept the results of next month's election.

Fraser Smith and Rachel Baye, of the WYPR reporting team, talk about how a group of Democrats want to use a wide-ranging mass transit proposal to create a wedge issue for the 2018 governor's race.

How much longer?

Oct 13, 2016
Tom Chalkley

WYPR's senior news analyst asks the question many of us are asking. Can this election please be over?

Fraser Smith and John Fritze, of the Baltimore Sun's Washington Bureau, talk about the changes in Clinton v Trump polling since the presidential nominees debated in September at Hofstra University.

Tom Chalkley

    

WYPR's senior news analyst says it's about time somebody--in this case the Baltimore Health Commissioner--came up with a plan to improve the health of Baltimore's citizens.

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