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WYPR Features

National Park Service

Populations of frogs and other amphibians have been declining around the world and biologist Lisa Schloegel believes that she may have discovered why.

Schloegel and her fellow researchers concluded that the breeding and farming of bullfrogs in Brazil, Taiwan and China, and the international sales of these live frogs may be spreading a fungus that causes a disease called chytridiomycosis, which is often deadly in amphibians.


Babies and toddlers don’t need fancy electronics to become STEM experts. They need the time and dedication of parents and educators.

Dunes

Mar 14, 2017
The National Aquarium

They might just look like piles of sand, but ocean sand dunes play a critical role in protecting our waterfront communities from the devastating effects of storm systems while providing important natural habitat for dozens of species. Let’s take a closer look!

Daniela Pasta and Pastries Facebook

If you can't just hop on a plane and fly to somewhere exotic, like, say, Sardinia, you can do the next best thing. And that would be to book a table at Daniela Restaurant in Hampden where you will be treated to the next best thing.

Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School and I invited Chef Daniela Useli to tell us about how she brings a little piece of Sardinia to Hampden.

To read more, click here

Fungi

Mar 14, 2017
Andy Roberts/flickr

On a recent hike through a forest in Howard County, my kids and I discovered something interesting growing on the side of a decaying beech tree stump. Each of the shelf-like fleshy growths were white-to-cream in color, oyster-shell-shaped and about the size of a CD. The top sides were smooth, almost velvety, but the undersides were heavily gilled like an infinite accordion. They were wild mushrooms, of course.

Improving Baltimore's Image

Mar 14, 2017

In this commentary, Augie Chiasera talks about his work on an image and perception task force which will create an action plan for improving Baltimore's overall image.

Construction Growth

Mar 14, 2017
Juan Camilo Trujillo/flickr

U.S. productivity growth, measured in terms of output per hour of labor has been anemic over the past several years.  As indicated by writer David Harrison, since 1995, overall productivity has expanded at a compound annual rate of less than 1.8 percent. Remarkably, America’s construction sector is actually less productive now than it was in 1995 according to a study released by the McKinsey Global Institute.  

Anirban has more of the story. 


Fats

Mar 13, 2017
Brett/flickr

Fat gets a bad rap. Tony and Chef discuss what "fat" brings to your food.

This segment originally aired on May 19, 2015.

RyanWhiteHealth/flickr

With all the changes to health insurance, one aspect that is talked about less but impacts millions of Americans is the expansion of Medicaid health insurance. Hector De La Torre discusses Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act and what happens if the ACA is repealed.

mprgomes/flickr

One of the most polarizing issues in America is illegal immigration. While some insist upon a nation of laws firmly enforced, others favor a more relaxed approach. Economists are also divided, but there are certainly many who believe that if America were to lose vast numbers of illegal workers, the nation’s economy would suffer.  

Anirban has more of this story. 


Danny's

Mar 10, 2017
Maryland Fisheries Service/DNR

Motorists driving north on Charles during March of 1989 were delighted to see, off to their right, high on the two story building at Biddle, a sign, “The Run Is On!” That sign appearing in late March every year was cheering: a favorite Baltimore dish was again available at Danny’s Restaurant—boneless shad and shad roe. But Danny’s is closed, there is no longer public notice that it’s shad season in Baltimore.

Dan Fuccella/flickr

One of the greatest fears of workers is their potential to be replaced by technology. Many of us have already been forced to shift jobs due to automation. As pointed out by writer Binyamin Appelbaum, in 1900, factories and farms employed 60 percent of the nation’s workforce. By 1950, those two sectors employed about 36 percent of the workforce -- by 2014, less than 10 percent of worked in a factory or on a farm.  

Anirban has the rest of this story. 


Preserving the Past

Mar 9, 2017
MARMIA

Siobhan Hagan, president and CEO of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Moving Image Archive tells us about the value of audio-visual preservation.

Russell Hill

Mar 9, 2017

Joining us for today's "Why Baltimore" is Russell Hill, director and professor at The Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology.

Economic Growth

Mar 9, 2017
Jon Welsh/flickr

Last year, the U.S. economy expanded 1.6 percent. During last year’s final quarter, the economy expanded at a 1.9 percent annualized rate and growth is actually not expected to pick up significantly during the current quarter. So much of the talk about faster U.S. economic growth is largely speculative. In this context, one could ask the question, just how much faster could the U.S. economy grow?  

Anirban has more on this story. 


Mr Ehater/flickr

According to new research conducted by the Census Bureau, fewer than one-third of Americans are saving money in the 401k and other workplace retirement accounts. This research is based on an analysis of tax records. This is shocking since nearly 80 percent of Americans work for an employer that offers retirement programs, whether a 401K or a 403B or something else. Only 32 percent of workers sign up for such accounts.  

Anirban has the rest of the story. 


"Mary Clocker"

Mar 9, 2017

In 1638, fourteen year old Mary Lawn sailed to America in search of a better life, beating the odds time and again in the rough and tumble world of colonial Maryland.  

Book information

Tom Pelton

Last week, more than a thousand activists marched down Main Street in Annapolis, then paraded in a circle around the State House, chanting, cheering, and waving signs reading “Don’t Frack Maryland.” 

Even bagpipers joined the protest, with their wailing adding a militant sound to the protesters, two of whom wore skull masks and costumes that made them look like devilish oil rigs.

The people were voicing their support for a bill that would have Maryland lawmakers permanently ban hydraulic fracturing for natural gas in the state.

Two years ago, Maryland imposed a temporary moratorium on the high-pressure injection of water and chemicals into shale rock to release gas. But that moratorium will expire in October, and fracking and drilling will likely begin in Western Maryland after that if lawmakers do not act this spring.


Yalumba

Mar 8, 2017
yalumba.com

Yalumba is one of Australia's best known wineries.  Long known for their famous Yalumba Pipe Port, their portfolio also includes a strong lineup of tables wines.

Click here for the complete wine list.

Alternative Facts

Mar 8, 2017

Lies, fibs, tall tales, or shall we say “alternative facts.” Whatever you want to call them, it’s a natural part of a child’s development to experiment with the truth. But they need you to guide them.

Energy Prices

Mar 8, 2017
Tarah6801/flickr

Despite all the drama emerging from Washington, D.C. and other national capitals around the world, the U.S. economy continues to show signs of gathering momentum. As indicated by writer Neil Irwin, some of the factors at work may turn out to be temporary. For instance, energy prices were very low about a year ago, but have since recovered, helping to drive more investment into oil exploration and similarly situated activities. For instance, energy prices were very low about a year ago, but have since recovered, helping to drive more investment into oil exploration and similarly situated activities.

Anirban has more of the story. 

 

Women's History is American History

Mar 7, 2017

Dr. Kaye Wise Whitehead shares her reflection on and appreciation of Women's History Month.

Spinach

Mar 7, 2017
Kristin/flickr

It's a comfort to think that spring is creeping up on us and in a few weeks the markets will be open with the first produce of the year, some of it grown in hoop houses.  And one of the first things we can expect is spinach, and that makes us smile.

The first spinach, which often has been exposed to cold crisp air, is often the sweetest.  Besides its marvelous flavor, spinach is, as Popeye averred, really healthy for you.  It's a great nutrient delivery vehicle, and the only caveat we can offer is not to over-cook it.

To read more click here.

Healthcare Spending

Mar 7, 2017
RyanWhiteHealth/flickr

For years, various agencies have been striving to reduce America’s health-related expenditures. Despite those efforts, a recent report from nonpartisan experts at Health and Human Services concludes that healthcare spending will continue to claim an expanding share of national resources for the foreseeable future – and that’s regardless of what the new president and congress do with the Affordable Care Act. 

Anirban has more of the story. 


The Signifance of Auschwitz

Mar 6, 2017
Jewish Museum of Maryland

Deborah Cardin, deputy director of programs and development at the Jewish Museum of Maryland tells us about "Remembering Auschwitz: History, Holocaust, Humanity" and the significance of Auschwitz today. This exhibition is supported by Maryland Humanities.

Baby Box

Mar 6, 2017

Boxes are the latest trend. You can subscribe to have a box deliver your meals. There’s one with razors and organic shaving cream. And one with new desserts to try. Now there’s a box that saves baby’s lives.

David J/flickr

If people expect an economy to expand slowly, then that economy is likely to expand slowly. In other words, expectations are likely to become self-fulfilling prophecy. This is the conclusion of a new paper authored by three economists. As reported by The Wall Street Journal, the economists, including Olivier Blanchard from the Peterson Institute for International Economics, generate key insights relative to productivity.

Anirban has more of the story. 


Alex Schierholtz/flickr

For three years now, the Ravens have been model citizens on the subject of domestic violence, assiduously avoiding any player who had a direct connection to inflicting hurt on a woman or child.

The video of former running back Ray Rice that surfaced in the spring of 2014 and the fallout that followed pretty much ensured that team owner Steve Bischiotti would be highly circumspect bordering on hostile about any player carrying that baggage.

But Bischiotti and his brain trust have a potentially significant challenge to their stance, namely a pressing need and a player with domestic violence issues who could fill that need.

Brandon Marshall, who was just released by the New York Jets, is a six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver.

RyanWhiteHealth/flickr

With the change in Washington, there's a lot of talk about repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. But what's changed for consumers, if anything? Hector De La Torre gives us some insight.

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