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WYPR Features

Hector sorts out the essentials of the upcoming open enrollment period. 

Click on the image for the MER's the week of October 16. 

Brian Ralphs/flickr

I consider myself to be an experienced fisherman. I spent most of my childhood with a fishing rod in my hands and I've braved extreme weather in hopes of catching that "legendary" fish. Occasionally, I will take my two children, Jack and Emma, to a nearby lake or pond where we spend all day casting lines. One day during a fishing expedition, we ran into some serious competition. Our challenger had long, skinny legs, a graceful neck, and the ability to grab fish straight out of the water!

Cold Stunned Turtles

Oct 23, 2017
The National Aquarium

Each fall, the National Aquarium’s Animal Rescue team takes in cold stunned turtles from the northeast region. Learn more about what this condition means in these endangered animals.

Matt DiCarlo

Oct 20, 2017

Tom talks with Matt DiCarlo, Associate Director of The Color Purple. 

Learn more:

The Hippodrome 

The Bromo Tower Arts & Entertainment District

Taura Musgrove

Oct 20, 2017

Joining us today for "Why Baltimore," is Taura Musgrove, graduate student at Johns Hopkins University and creator of the app "Freedom Fighter." 

The Diplomats

Oct 20, 2017
JD Hancock

In the early afternoon of August 23, 1963, three African American diplomats, dressed in full and colorful diplomatic attire, entered Miller Brothers restaurant at Fayette and Hanover Streets—in those days, strictly segregated. They introduced themselves as representatives of the Republic of Gabon. But they were not. Who were they? They ordered lunch, enjoyed it, and left—and made history. The story…

Working Seniors

Oct 19, 2017

Many of us worry that we will not have the financial capacity to actually retire. We are living longer, which is a good thing, but our lives are also more expensive and many of use to not have an extensive financial safety net.  Accordingly, record number of Americans older than 65 are working – now nearly 1 in 5 as indicated by The Washington Post.  

Oktoberfest Beers

Oct 18, 2017
@joefoodie/flickr

Click  on the image for Al and Hugh's brew picks. 

Ecowatch

Earlier this year, I was in southeast Texas, taking pictures of an oil refinery for a report about air pollution and the harm it causes to lower-income communities like Port Arthur, Texas.

As I stood on a public roadway, a private security guard pulled up behind my car and demanded to know who I was and what I was doing.  I showed him my driver’s license and patiently explained the environmental journalism project I was researching. He reported me to the FBI as a potential terrorist.

My wife was startled when an FBI agent showed up at our house in Baltimore to investigate. I provided the agent with a detailed, written description of the report about air pollution I was working on. That seemed to satisfy the FBI, although it sent a chill down my spine.

I told my story to Alleen Brown, a reporter with The Intercept who has been investigating the increasing coordination between oil and gas companies, their private security firms, law enforcement – and efforts to smear and intimidate environmentalists.

“Yeah, actually that story doesn’t surprise me at all,” Brown said.

"Joe Gans"

Oct 18, 2017

In 1902, Joe Gans, a black boxer from Baltimore, became Lightweight Champion of the World. 

The Night Heron

Oct 18, 2017
The National Aquarium

As a variety of public and private organizations strive to improve the water quality of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, we are seeing a resurgence of native species not only below the water’s surface, but soaring high above as well, like the graceful night heron.

If you have ever been to New Orleans, you know that there is something special, almost magical, about the city. On this edition of "The Weekly Reader," we feature two novels that capture the unique physical and emotional landscape of The Big Easy, Margaret Wilkerson Sexton’s "A Kind of Freedom" and C. Morgan's "The Floating World." 

Your Song

Oct 18, 2017
ElizaC3/flickr

It happens all over the world regardless of language or culture—a mother sings to her baby to soothe, to comfort, and to connect. Researchers at the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music found that this ritual has profound effects on mothers too.  

Forced Servitude at Hampton

Oct 18, 2017

History tells us that many Americans, whether black or white, shared similar experiences in early America. Some of that history has been uncovered right in our backyard through the Hampton National Historic Site. Anokwale Anansesemfo, historian of the African Diaspora in America and national park ranger at Hampton, tells us more about Hampton’s history of forced servitude.

Irvine Nature Center/Facebook

One of my family’s favorite places to vacation in the summer is the beach. We always enjoy exploring the beach and seeing the wildlife that lives there. I love watching the sandpipers poke in the sand for insects in between the waves crashing on the shore. However, recently we’ve noticed new hotels, parking lots, and buildings popping up around our favorite beach town and it made me wonder how much we're losing in return. 

Damien Walmsley/flickr

They do fast food a little differently in England;  I learned that my first trip over.  Scattered around every English town of any size are little food trucks selling fish and chips.  And even though we can't quite match the original, we can give fish and chips the old college try. And Chef JP, fish and chips are a tasty treat...and perfect for watching football.

Fish and chips certainly is not a hard dish to make, and given our great choices of firm white fish here in Maryland, we can easily whip up a convincing batch. Did someone say rockfish?

Saving the Bay

Oct 17, 2017
Michael Busada

Will Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation discusses the organization's efforts to protect the bay.

zeevveez/flickr

Catherine shares some new research on caregivers.

Click on the image for the MER's the week of October 9. 

www.personalcreations.com

Do you know any four-year-olds who might actually be superheroes? What about a three-year-old who is a master chef? In the quickly developing mind of a young child these possibilities are as real as can be. A multitude of new research shows overwhelming benefits of a child’s make-believe play.

Unpaid Eldercare

Oct 13, 2017

For a growing share of older Americans, retirement may be approaching, but so too is a new job:  unpaid care for the elderly...

Rob Crim

Oct 13, 2017

The BioHealth Innovation Index compared Central Maryland’s innovation cluster with the most prolific in the country, including Boston, Pittsburgh, and San Diego. Home to more than 70 federal labs, numerous research institutions, and more than 275,000 people working in the BioHealth industries—the region ranked #1 in talent, based on concentration of workers and level of education. Joining us today for Why Baltimore is Rob Crim, President and CEO of Vaya Pharma USA, a UMB BioPark company that makes medical food products to manage nutritional imbalances.

Death of an Arabber

Oct 13, 2017
Andrew Hazlett/flickr

On July 23, 2017, four horse-and-wagons formed a funeral cortege at the entrance to the Wylie Funeral Home at 701 Mt. Street. Crowds had gathered to say goodbye to Eugene Allen, among the last of Baltimore’s street Arabbers, who with their memorable yells, sold fruits and vegetables off of their horse and wagons. We may have lost Mr. Allen but, cherishing horse and wagon selling in Baltimore, we have his yells.

Arabber calls (originally aired in 1989) provided by All Things Considered.

Winston Frazer

Oct 13, 2017

Winston Frazer, President and CEO of Danae Prosthetics joins us for today's '"Why Baltimore."

"Hound Dog"

Oct 12, 2017

The story behind the hit song and its tie to Baltimore. 

Grab Bag of Bottles

Oct 12, 2017
Stewart Butterfield/flickr

This week, Hugh and Al talk about wines produced by folks who are known for something else.

Edible Plants

Oct 12, 2017
Chris Luczkow/flickr

My kids used to gather a bucket full of plants and twigs they foraged from our backyard and offer it to me and my wife as “soup.” While most of those ingredients were inedible, you’d be surprised how many were edible and rich in vitamins and minerals! Their favorite food to serve, and most easily harvested, was Dandelions. I can remember the shock on their faces when I put the whole thing, stem and flower, in my mouth, chewed and then swallowed.

Manatees

Oct 12, 2017
aqua.org/blog

These gentle giants have rebounded in recent years, making their way off the endangered species list, but we must be vigilant to protect their resurgence. Let’s check in with manatees.   

Connecting with Students through Literature

Oct 12, 2017

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