WYPR Features | WYPR

WYPR Features

The Great Mystery Show

Mar 9, 2018
Courtesy of Peter Eglington

“Who am I?” “Is there an afterlife?” Science, philosophy, religion, and art have converged to answer some of life’s biggest questions, many of which we still don’t have answers to. The Great Mystery Show at the American Visionary Art Museum celebrates the unknown, the imagination and the search for answers. Rebecca Hoffberger, the museum’s founder and director, tells us more about the exhibit.

"Ten Bears"

Mar 8, 2018

In 1975, The Morgan State University Lacrosse team defeated Washington " Lee in the biggest upset in NCAA Lacrosse history.

To stretch out one’s retirement savings, one may have to eventually move to a lower cost city. Many people from the northeast United States end up moving to the American South, with one of the major factors being warmer weather. But that’s hardly the only factor. States like North and South Carolina tend to have costs of living far beneath what one contends with in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey or Maryland.  One of the difficulties in understanding differential costs of living in various areas is a dearth of comparable data.

Christy Wyskiel, adviser to the president of Johns Hopkins University tells us why Baltimore is a hub for bio and tech innovation. 

The National Aquarium

When looking to make a positive conservation impact, start in the heart of your home. Your kitchen is full of opportunities for going greener. Here are some simple suggestions. 

Funding for the Arts

Mar 7, 2018
The Walters Art Museum

Julia Marciari-Alexander, Executive Director of the Walters Art Museum, discusses the importance of funding for the arts.

Media Matters

For more than a quarter century, the Bay Journal has been a respected voice on the Chesapeake Bay cleanup effort, funded in part through grants from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Then last spring, the journal published stories about the Trump Administration’s proposed deep cuts to EPA and how they would damage the Chesapeake Bay cleanup. In response, a political appointee in the Trump Administration decided that EPA’s $325,000 annual payments to the Bay Journal would be abruptly terminated in the second year of a six-year contract.

The Trump appointee, John Konkus, said: “the American people have major concerns with newspapers and the media,” according to a report by Greenwire. And so Konkus, an EPA communications official who also works as a media consultant for Republican political campaigns, saw no reason for EPA to keep funding the Bay Journal.

In a Senate committee hearing, Maryland Senator Ben Cardin, a Democrat, grilled EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt about what appeared to be a politically motivated attack on the freedom of the press.

 

The Shrew

Mar 7, 2018

I was walking in the woods last week when I saw a small, furry flash race across the ground. It was too small to be a squirrel, and a little too big to be a mouse. I thought that I might have seen a mole, but this animal had small feet and lacked the flappy scuttling motion that a mole’s oversized feet would make. I stood there, puzzled by what I had seen. Was it a rat? What was it? Upon further reflection, I remembered the animal’s long snout and beady eyes. It was then that I realized I hadn’t seen a mouse or a rat or a mole…I had seen a shrew.

Ben’s Basketball Dreams

Mar 7, 2018

A brain injury can happen to a child in a matter of seconds, changing their life forever. Dr. Stacy Suskauer from Kennedy Krieger’s Center for Brain Injury Recovery shares a story about Ben, a boy whose life changed in an instant at the age of 10 when a car struck the bike he was riding. Hear how Ben was determined to play a sport he loves again, and have a college life, despite a traumatic brain injury.

Cry Like a Baby

Mar 7, 2018

Babies cry….a lot. But did you know they cry in womb too? A mother’s stress just may be effect how much.

Paul Aloe/flickr

Al and Hugh give some picks for light and bright wines to have on your table this spring.

Today, our book critic Marion Winik shares two poetry collections that she says everyone needs to have around the house for moments that call for the perfect poem.

Logan Ingalls/flickr

The first spinach, which often has been exposed to cold crisp air, is often the sweetest.  Besides its marvelous flavor, spinach is, as Popeye averred, really healthy for you.  It's a great nutrient delivery vehicle, and the only caveat we can offer is not to over-cook it. Al and Chef Jerry Pellegrino give two spinach recipes that'll keep you feeling strong and satisfied!

Household debt, oil imports, the French economy, the rural economy, and immigrants in the direct care industry.

Haussner's

Mar 2, 2018

On the afternoon of December 18, 1999, watched anxiously in auctioneering house in Timonium, as the auctioneer rattled off the artifacts for sale from the once and famous and now defunct Haussner's restaurant - weeks earlier a reigning queen at Eastern Avenue and Conkling streets. In the end the memories of thousands of lunches and dinners and of millions of dollars of artwork and 73 years of Baltimore times winds up in a ball of twine - on display in an antique shop on Fells Point.

Spencer Finch

Mar 2, 2018
Mitro Hood.

Moon Dust (Apollo 17) transforms the BMA’s majestic Fox Court, evoking in viewers a sense of wonder. For the next seven years, museum visitors can enjoy the sublime light installation by Spencer Finch. For this episode of Art Matters, the New York-based artist spoke with BMA Director Christopher Bedford about Moon Dust and how the installation’s 447 lights and 150 fixtures are a scientifically precise representation of the chemical composition of moon dust gathered during the Apollo 17 mission.

"Jacob Gruber"

Mar 1, 2018

In 1818, Jacob Gruber, a minister from Pennsylvania, was charged with inciting a slave revolt in Maryland when he preached about abolition in Hagerstown.

Feminist Art History and Linda Nochlin

Mar 1, 2018

In honor of Women’s History Month, each Humanities Connection segment in March will feature a woman in media management, those working at art museums, or in the art history world. Lael J. Ensor-Bennett kicks off the month by teaching us about one of the founders of feminist art history, Linda Nochlin. Ensor-Bennett is the Assistant Visual Resources Curator at Johns Hopkins University.

Kim Klacik

Mar 1, 2018

At Potential Me, we believe a community thrives best when all individuals contribute in ways that utilize their talent and skillset. We began as a non-profit four years ago to support women who are in college, trade school, military bound, or already in the work force, by supplying them with the proper tools needed to not only obtain employment opportunities, but to thrive within them.

What makes a great dog book? Marion Winik shares a trio of classic dog tales and a new one to add to the canine canon. 

Stock Ownership

Mar 1, 2018

There has been a lot of discussion in recent years regarding America’s retirement savings crisis.  One might think that a significant fraction of this crisis has been resolved by a booming stock market, with the logic being that 401Ks and 403Bs have been sufficiently stimulated to better position Americans for their golden years.  But data indicate that rising or falling stock prices have little impact on the income of wealth of most families. The reason?  They own little or no stock.  As indicated by writer Patricia Cohen, an astonishing 84 percent of all stocks owned by Americans belong to the wealthiest 10 percent of households... 

French Reds

Feb 28, 2018
Cameron Kennedy/flickr

Al and Hugh give their picks for some French reds you can trust. 

Full STEAM Ahead

Feb 28, 2018

 


STEM or Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics is an educational philosophy and practice which has really gained momentum of late. But it’s missing something that not only changes the acronym, but the entire program. Add an A for Art and make STEAM.

Natural Gas Now

Next month, the Maryland Public Service Commission will vote on whether to allow a Canadian energy company to buy Washington Gas and Light, a public utility that has provided electricity and natural gas to customers in the District of Columbia and Maryland suburbs for more than a century.

The proposed merger of AltaGas and Washington Gas is part of a trend across the country. Increasing numbers of locally-owned and controlled public utilities are being bought up by large corporate conglomerates based in distant headquarters, according to Paul Patterson, a utility industry analyst at Glenrock Associates in New York.

 “What you are seeing generally speaking in the utility sector is a considerable amount of consolidation for several years now,” Patterson said. “So, in the Washington DC area, for instance, you saw PEPCO – which is a familiar name on the electric side – that was bought recently by Exelon, which owns Baltimore Gas and Electric and some other utilities in Philadelphia and Chicago.”

As part of the discussions over Maryland’s approval of the proposed $4.5 billion AltaGas/Washington Gas merger deal, Governor Larry Hogan’s administration negotiated for the Canadian company to pay $103 million to kick start a natural gas pipeline expansion project in rural areas throughout Maryland, according to the Maryland Energy Administration.

http://icecubez.com/

If any of us are competent home cooks, it's because we have accumulated hundreds and hundreds of small little lessons on how to do it right. And if you spend as much time talking cooking with Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School as Jerry do, you will pick up a think or two. Here are just a few of hundreds of tips Jerry has complied.

David Byron Keener/Shutterstock.com

As part of our continuing look at life in the Inner Harbor, learn more about northern water snakes and the important role they play in this ecosystem. 

"Black Panther," a Blessing to our Culture

Feb 27, 2018

Rev. Alvin C. Hathaway comments how "Black Panther" serves as an introduction to the "majesty, elegance and contributions of African culture."

Rockfish

Feb 27, 2018

We’ve had some unseasonably warm weather recently, which teases so many possibilities for springtime and beyond. Of course, when we’re having such pleasant weather in February, it makes me think of one of my favorite outdoor activities—fishing.

Last year in May, I was out on the Bay for a Saturday fishing trip. The sun was shining, the breeze was blowing—it was a truly picture perfect day in Maryland. Suddenly, my line tightened—I had a bite! As I embarked on one of man’s most harrowing primeval adventures—the battle between a man and a fish on his line—I could feel the excitement build. The fish put up quite a fight, but in the end I had caught a 25 inch Rockfish, also known as a Striped Bass.

Through the 1960s, the southeast corner of the tiny island, where Calvert street splits at Fayette, was where Abe Sherman’s famous but ancient newsstand—some called it a “shack”-- was located and very much a part of Baltimore downtown’s scene of bustle and grit. Hundreds of motorists would passing by would flip Abe a dollar or so and he would flip back a newspaper—he knew who got which. But civic forces wanted his old new stand removed and this is the story of the City Hall’s  and the local pigeons’ attack on his shack and how he beat them all!

Anirban on wage growth, worker strikes, variable pay, unemployment rates and millionaire households. 

Pages