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WYPR Features

Brittany Lindsey

Soup - a liquid dish, typically made by boiling meat, fish, or vegetables, etc., in stock or water  

That cool snap in the air is so welcome after a particularly hot summer.  And it may be my imagination but I think that cool air carries the aroma of cooking food in a way that puts a smile on my face.  This is the time for soup making, ideally a day-long process that puts a keen edge on your appetite. Here are some of Jerry and Chef Amy von Lange's ideas for simple soups.

Cleaning Up the Harbor

Oct 11, 2017

Michael "Mike" Hankin, President and CEO at Brown Advisory tells us about the efforts to clean up Baltimore's harbor, which he plans to swim across in 2020.

Almost every Irish Catholic friend I can think of has a “crazy nun story.” On this edition of "The Weekly Reader," we feature books about nuns, including Alice McDermott’s latest, "The Ninth Hour" and "Saints for All Occasions," the fourth novel by J. Courtney Sullivan. 

Tom Pelton

Most consumers know the ‘buy local’ and 'organic' labels for produce. But not everyone knows that just because something is grown locally and organically does not mean it is good for the Chesapeake Bay.

After all, factory-farmed chicken from Maryland’s Eastern Shore is local, but organic manure from this industry and Pennsylvania dairy farms are major sources of water pollution.  People who want to pick food that is healthy for both the bay and their bodies should consider supporting visionary farmers who are also dedicated to clean water.  That would include farmers like Brett Grohsgal, 56, who has been running the Even’ Star Organic Farm in southern Maryland for almost 20 years.

Instead of growing vast fields of a monoculture – like corn or soybeans –  Grohsgal allows half of his 100 acres in St. Mary’s County to remain forested.  And he aggressively rotates 70 different crops -- including cucumber, sweet potatoes and flowers -- from plot to plot on much of his remaining land. To protect the health of the two streams that flow through his property, he planted rows of black locust trees and loblolly pines to act as natural water filters.

Grohsgal is part of the new "Fair Farms" movement in Maryland.  Fair Farms is an alliance of 90 farmers, environmental organizations and farmers that supports growers who are not only organic, but also using practices like forested buffers along streams, which many conventional farmers do not use.

Medicare.gov via AP

Hector tells us about a Medicare change that has "nothing to with what you're hearing in Washington." 

Joy/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.   

As the weather begins to chill, Tony and Chef Cindy talk about soups and the challenge of matching them with wine. We hear from Eva Dehlinger of Dehlinger Winery about her favorite soup and wine pairings.

HK Elevators

Oct 6, 2017
Steve Snodgrass/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.   

On a Saturday afternoon in 1946, on an elevator in the popular downtown department store, Hochschild Kohn, a uniformed elevator operator was calling out to passengers, “Fourth  floor, Ladies dresses, special sale today!” An elevator operator selling merchandise while calling out floors? So beloved was this custom that when the store installed automatic elevators, they had to call the operators back. To call out floors and merchandise!

Abolitionist "Captain" John Brown made quite an impression on Frederick Douglass when they met, but, while bound by the same passion, 

the two men went on to fight to end slavery by very different means. 

Better Living Through the Humanities

Oct 5, 2017

What is the importance of the humanities to the future of our nation? Dr. Jim Salvucci, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Buena Vista University offers this reflection of how the humanities bring meaning to our lives.

There is a notion there when people retire, their spending immediately plunges. After all, retirement implies a rapid transition to fixed income, including perhaps income from Social Security. But it doesn’t work like that. For many people, retirement appears to be a multi-year transition rather than representing a discrete point in time...  

Tom Pelton

In the early 19th century there was a Baltimore tavern owner and merchant named Joseph Hart. He had his own, unconventional way of looking at the world – and he did not trust banks.

He was also somewhat strange and secretive. And so all of the money that he earned from his tavern, he snuck offshore in a boat and buried on a tiny, marshy island east of Essex, at the mouth of the Back River in the Chesapeake Bay.

As legend had it, the tavern owner – in his legitimate business dealings or otherwise – also somehow came into possession of a barrel full of gold pieces.  And so he also buried that on what became known as Hart Island.


Economists agree: investing in early childhood saves money. 

marylandwine.com

Al and Hugh discuss some of the winning wines in the Maryland Governor's Cup Competition. Click on the image for the list. 

Click on the image for the list.

Bryan Maleszyk/flickr

We're in the middle of our harvest season, when farmers all over Maryland are bringing in the food they've worked so hard to produce.  In Italy this season is celebrated with the Feast of San Martino, who quite logically is the patron saint of grape pickers, winemakers and sommeliers. So to fill us in on this festival, we've invited a friend whose knowledge and understanding of this Feast is first rate, Chef Sergio Vitale of Aldo's Restaurant in  Little Italy. Chef Sergio gave us a few ideas for celebrating San Martino. Here they are.

Aquaculture

Oct 3, 2017
BRIAN GRATWICKE/FLICKR

We all want to do what's best for our ocean planet but we're drowning in choices. And consumers are asking 'what is best?' In this episode, John sheds some light on seafood and aquaculture.

Confronting the Sites of Confederate Monuments

Oct 3, 2017
MICA

Samuel Hoi, president of the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, offers a follow-up plan for what to do with the vacant sites of Confederate monuments. 

Sophia Bevilacqua/flickr

Catherine tells us about the dark side of 401K loans. 

Goldenrod

Oct 3, 2017
Friends of the Prairie Learning Center and Neal Smith NWR/flickr

The end of summer is often announced by the arrival of Goldenrod, the yellow clusters of tall stemmed flowers popping up everywhere. If you’re like me, you dread this change of season not because of the colder weather settling in but because of the dreadful allergies it brings with it. My son and I both suffer from seasonal allergies and this time of year can be the worst. Our sneezing, wheezing, coughing, and itching was thought to be a result of those yellow flowers we’ve seen sprouting up everywhere. However, while Goldenrod does produce pollen, it is falsely accused of your seasonal suffering.

Kenneth Leung/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.  

It is one of the most efficient and cost effective (not to mention delicious!) ways to get your protein. This week it’s all about beans. Tony and Chef Cindy explore what is and isn’t a bean, they share some recipes and chat Ian Seletsky of Richfield Farms in Carrol County, MD. Ian grows a variety of beans on his farm and shares some first-hand insights on these lovely legumes.

Austin Kirk/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.  

It’s been 24 years, nearly a generation, since Charles Barkley uttered the famous words "I am not a role model." 

At the time, many people, myself included, thought Barkley was copping out, of begging out of the time-honored tradition of sports figure as hero or heroine.

Perhaps it was just naivete, but we used to live in a time where you could admire someone simply because he played sports, where you could ascribe heroic traits to a man simply because he hit a baseball, threw a touchdown or dunked a basketball.

Kyle Leslie

Click on the image for the podcast. 

Weather at the Fair

Sep 30, 2017

Click on the image for the audio.  

Gil tells us about the people who made sure the Baltimore City Fair went on without a hitch. 

Young Workers

Sep 28, 2017

As challenging as many older workers have found it to save money for retirement, the situation may be even worse for younger workers.  The rising cost of education represents a major challenge for Millennials trying to get a head start on saving for retirement.

Kathryn Decker/flickr

Click on the image for The Morning Economic Reports for the week of September 25.

redspotted/flickr

Click on the image for The Morning Economic Reports for the week of September 18.

Samuel Hoi

Sep 28, 2017

A recent Kauffman Foundation study revealed that in 2016 Maryland ranked 13th in the country for startup activity. The Greater Baltimore region alone boasts an impressive number of higher education institutions, for which there is no shortage of ideas and ambition being produced. Joining us today for Why Baltimore is Samuel Hoi, President of the Maryland Institute College of Art, or MICA.

Aranami/flickr

Click on the image for The MERs for the week of September 11.

Killdeer

Sep 28, 2017
Becky Matsubara/flickr

Last spring, our Nature Preschool class thought they found an injured bird while exploring the property. The bird, who had two black bands across its white chest, was fluttering on the ground with what appeared to be a broken wing. What the students didn’t realize is that they were actually witnessing a great performance. . .

WBAL-TV

Last week, in the far south Baltimore neighborhood of Curtis Bay, an accident at a chemical factory released a huge cloud of chlorosulfonic acid – a gas that can burn the lungs and even be fatal.

Longshoreman Kasimir Kowalski was working nearby.  “A truck of chemicals inadvertently pulled off with the line still hooked up, and ripped the line and the chemicals came out and hit the ground and that’s why you got the flume,” he said.

The Baltimore Fire Department issued a “shelter in place” warning. City officials told 18,000 households within a mile radius of the Solvay Inc. USA chemical plant at 3440 Fairfield Road in Baltimore to remain indoors, close their windows, and try to avoid contact with the toxic yellow cloud drifting over the city.

No serious injuries were reported. But several Curtis Bay residents were angry about the lack of effective safety procedures and good public information about the numerous chemical and industrial plants that surround their homes.

 


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