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WYPR Features

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Hector walks us through a major accreditation program for physicians, health care plans and medical groups provided by the National Committee for Quality Assurance.

This week: Americans' net worth of income, immigration policy, the uninsured, work-life balance in Asian countries, and IRS audits.

Bill Haley

Apr 13, 2018

In the 1950s Baltimore’s downtown movies were suffering—so many of its patrons had moved to the suburbs. Among the movie theaters abandoned in the exodus was Keith’s, at Lexington and Liberty Streets... The management of Keith’s was at long last faced with a decision—try to keep the movie theater open by bringing in sure-fire live attractions, or close the place. It decided to do the former and so brought in super-rock star Bill Haley and His Comets. In a quirky Baltimore twist, Bill Haley, whom Keith management brought in to keep the place open, was the one who closed it down. This is the story of how.

Our American Family at Historic Sotterley

Apr 12, 2018

Last year, Historic Sotterley, a former plantation in Southern Maryland, began the Descendants Project. They gathered information about anyone affiliated with Sotterley, whether they were enslaved, employed or otherwise associated with the site. This month, Sotterley hosts Our American Family, funded with a grant from Maryland Humanities. The event will connect existing and emerging stories of Sotterley descendants with members of the public interested in Southern Maryland’s history. Jeanne Pirtle, Education Director at Sotterley, tells us more about the project.

On this week's Why Baltimore, Towson University President Kim Schatzel discusses what makes the Baltimore region so unique.

Continuing the Fight: Lavinia Margaret Engle

Apr 12, 2018
Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame

The ratification of suffrage did not mark the end of the fight for women’s voting rights, according to Lavinia Margaret Engle. Women needed to stay organized to overcome any obstacles they might face in exercising their new right, she believed. So she helped to establish the Maryland League of Women Voters and led the organization for more than a decade.

Downward Mobility

Apr 12, 2018

A recent Forbes article concludes that there are 8.5 million older workers and their spouses who will experience downward mobility in retirement absent some deviation from current trend. Who are these endangered 8.5 million?

Jenny Ondioline/flickr

It's a perfect wine for the season and Al and Hugh have their recommendations for some delicious Pinot Noirs for under $25.00.  Click the links below to purchase Al and Hugh's recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

The Washington Post

At Midnight on Monday, the Maryland General Assembly’s annual session ended with applause and a traditional Latin phrase for adjournment.

“Sine die!” a state lawmaker called out, receiving loud and sustained applause in the senate chambers.

The most significant environmental bill to pass this year came in reaction to President Trump’s announcement in January that his administration would open up the East Coast to offshore drilling, including off Ocean City Maryland and at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.

State Delegate Kumar Barve, the Democratic chair of the House Environment and Transportation committee, co-sponsored a bill that will hold any drilling companies strictly liable for paying for the full cost of any damages and cleanups from oil spills.

Ravioli

Apr 11, 2018
blue moon in her eyes/flickr

As our region's markets slowly wake up this spring, we begin to encounter all sorts of tempting food. With items like fresh baby spinach sharing space with the last of winter's butternut squash our minds start conjuring up recipe ideas. One of the best ways to make use of fresh Maryland produce is to become adept at making ravioli. Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School points out, it's no exaggeration to say the possibilities are endless.

Here's some tips about making ravioli.

Get Outside Now

Apr 11, 2018


Over 55% of parents surveyed in ten countries said their children spent less than an hour a day playing outside. Shockingly the researchers determined that one in ten children never play outside. Let’s get children outside…now.   

Reflecting on MLK's Legacy

Apr 10, 2018

Rev. Alvin C. Hathaway of Union Baptist Church reflects on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination, and how the fight for justice continues. 

I was out for a walk recently when I thought I saw a small bird flying in the distance. Its wings were a purple-ish brown color with buttery yellow edges that were bordered by bright blue spots. This bird seemed like it was in no particular rush to be anywhere—it was just flying around aimlessly. No native bird I could think of had coloring like this, and birds are unlikely to fly without direction. It was then that I realized I wasn’t looking at a small bird at all—I was instead watching the flight of a large mourning cloak butterfly. The arrival of mourning cloak butterflies in our region is one of the ways that our natural world tells us that spring time is here to stay.

They aren’t from this area, but they have certainly made themselves comfortable along our shores. Learn more about the adaptable, carnivorous cormorant not at home around the Chesapeake Bay. 

On this episode of The Weekly Reader, we review a pair of new novels that redefine the concept of a "quiet" retirement.

First time homebuyers, executive compensation, job openings, globalization and the possibility of recession. 

Titanic

Apr 5, 2018

William and Lucy Carter were just two of the passengers on the ill-fated, maiden voyage of the "unsinkable" Titanic in the early hours of April 15, 1912. Traveling first class, they survived the disaster, though their marriage did not.

Rosemary

Apr 5, 2018

It was on the cold morning of February 3, 1964 when the wrecker’s ball smashed into the south wall of Ford’s theater, between Eutaw and Howard streets, where it had stood since 1871. A pile of rubble was all that was left of the grand store house of theater memories. Later that morning, two elderly ladies, could be seen sprinkling on the debris what was later reported to be rosemary. One of the ladies was heard to say, “As Ophelia said in Hamlet, ‘Here’s rosemary, for remembrance.’” The ladies remarked that it was a cold morning. For Baltimore theater goers it was a very cold day. 

Stephen Towns

Apr 5, 2018
Joseph Hyde

Christopher Bedford talks with Baltimore-based artist Stephen Towns about his first museum exhibition, Rumination and a Reckoning, and his choice to use quilting as a medium to narrate the life of Nat Turner and his 1831 rebellion. Towns is also a Sondheim Artscape Prize Finalist whose work will be on view in another exhibition at the BMA June 20 – August 5.

Jacob Hsu

Apr 5, 2018
Jacob Hsu/Linked In

This week's guest: Jacob Hsu from Catalyte, a software development firm.

Catonsville Nine 50th Anniversary

Apr 5, 2018

In 1968, activists in our own backyard protested the Vietnam War in a way that would become a landmark in our nation’s history of civil disobedience. 2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Catonsville Nine. Joby Taylor, Director of the Shriver Peaceworkers Fellows Program at UMBC, tells us more about the historic events in Maryland and plans to acknowledge their impact.

There continues to be much discussion regarding America’s retirement crisis. Far too many people lack adequate retirement savings, and face diminished living standards once they stop working. In response, there has been a move toward automatic enrollment in employer-sponsored retirement plans.

Chablis

Apr 4, 2018
Lee Coursey/flickr

Al and Hugh give their picks for some notable chablis. 

Childhood brain development has been the focus of much study over the last few decades. Childhood moral development, on the other hand, has received significantly less attention. Until now.

If the word “essay” doesn’t trigger panic attacks and terrible memories of high school or college exams, have we got a pair of books for you! On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we feature new work from Tim Kreider and Carina Chocano.

A Child’s Hopes Realized

Apr 4, 2018

April is Autism Awareness Month where we honor and recognize the millions of children, families and individuals around the world who are impacted by autism.

Union of Concerned Scientists

On Monday, the Trump Administration announced that it will be eliminating air pollution control standards for cars and trucks imposed six years ago that would have required a doubling in the fuel efficiency of vehicles by 2025.

This could mean larger gas-guzzlers on our roads. The President’s rationale for this and other recent regulatory rollbacks is his claim that environmental rules hurt the economy.

“Let’s cut the red tape,” President Trump said.  “Let’s set free our dreams, and yes, let’s make America great again. And one of the ways we’re going to do that is by getting rid of a lot of unnecessary regulation.”

This argument clashes with the historical record, which shows that auto makers enjoyed record-setting sales in 2016 and 2015 even under tighter fuel-efficiency standards imposed by the Obama Administration in 2012.

Greening Baltimore

Apr 3, 2018
Michael Busada

Will Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation discusses a partnership between the CBF and Baltimore City to add more green space in Baltimore through 90 projects in over 30 neighborhoods. 

Gemma Billings/flickr

At long last the moment is at hand, the culinary equivalent of baseball's Opening Day.  This coming weekend will mark the return of the Baltimore Farmers Market under the old JFX.  And for Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School, this means that his cooking classes will have a lot of great local food to work with.

The National Aquarium

Red-eared slider turtles are native to the mid- and south-central United States, so what are they doing swimming in the tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay?

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