WYPR Features | WYPR

WYPR Features

Dave McSpadden/flickr

Al and Hugh discuss an assortment of interesting wines that you'll want to pick up this season. 

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we feature two very different novels that start the same way: with a funeral.

Jessica Spengler/flickr

Spring is the season of eggs, themselves symbols of renewal.  It's also a great time for casual Sunday morning brunches. Al suggested and Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School agreed, there are certainly more than a few million egg recipes that would do well for an informal little brunch.  And for best results, you'll want to use fresh Maryland eggs.

Oil prices, disparities in hourly wages, the rate of unemployment, and the growth rate of pregnancies. 

Baltimoreans opened The Sun paper on the morning of October 1964 to read this modest announcement. "Each city recreation center will be conducting a Yo Yo contest." The winner of the contest was promised a huge prize - a trip to Disneyland by Duncan Yo Yo - the manufacturer of the Yo Yo. The winner turned out to be a young 15 year old Carl Pund - who won the contest but in a quirky turn of events, lost the prize. This is Carl Pund's story.

Brown Girls Museum Blog

Mar 15, 2018

How are two women pushing past the gatekeeping that sometimes occurs within cultural institutions? Amanda Figueroa and Ravon Ruffin started Brown Girls Museum Blog, a platform that aims to promote the visibility of people of color, especially women, in the museum field and in academia.

"Moses"

Mar 15, 2018

Between 1851 and 1860, Harriet Tubman freed a reported thousand slaves from the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Bad Mommies

Mar 15, 2018

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, our book critic Marion Winik reviews two new novels about women who seem to lack the maternal instinct.

In today's episode, Guy Filippelli, CEO of RedOwl Analytics tells us why his team made the decision to build a software company in Baltimore. 

You are probably not looking for a reason to retire early.  The reason is fairly obvious.  Early retirement may be much more pleasant that working well into one’s 60s or 70s or beyond.  But here’s another reason that renders early retirement more appealing – it could lengthen your life.  That’s the conclusion of research made available over the years as well as from a 2017 study published in the journal Health Economics.  As indicated by The New York Times, in that study, three economists from the Netherlands analyzed what transpired when some Dutch civil servants could temporarily quality for early retirement in 2005. Men responding to the early retirement offer were nearly three percentage points less likely to die over the next five years than those who did not retire early. Parenthetically, too few women met the early retirement eligibility criteria to be included in the study. In any case, these findings echo those of other studies. For instance, an analysis in the U.S. found that seven years of retirement can be as good for one’s health as reducing by 20 percent the chance of acquiring a serious disease like diabetes or heart conditions. The salubrious effects of retirement have also been discerned in studies using data from England, Germany, and Israel. This likely reflects the fact that for many people, work can be stressful and can leave little time for exercise.  

Thinking about getting a pet? In addition to being a good companion, that furry friend may help with your child’s brain development.

Maryland's Best

Mar 14, 2018
Ralf Smallkaa/flickr

Al and Hugh give a rundown of some of the best Maryland wines.

Tom Pelton

The Baltimore City Council on Monday approved two bills that environmental activists in the city had been fighting to advance for years.

The first bans the construction or expansion of any crude oil terminals in the city. The goal of this legislation, which passed by a vote of 14-1 and now must be signed by the mayor, is to reduce the risk that trains carrying volatile crude oil could derail and explode in the city.

The second bill outlaws a petroleum product: Styrofoam cups and fast-food containers, which do not break down in the environment like paper products, and so create a persistent source of litter, and a blight in streams and along roadsides.

Kevin Schofield/Flickr Creativ Commons

I’ve been to Gunpowder Falls State Park hundreds of times. I’ve gone canoeing through quiet streams, hiked miles upon miles, and fished throughout its narrow corridors. Each time I go, I hope to see an amazing, but elusive, animal that’s on most naturalists’ version of a bucket list. The remarkable ‘water acrobat:’ the river otter.

All About Algae

Mar 13, 2018
Kichigin/Shutterstock

All over our blue planet, wherever you find water, you’ll find algae. From tiny microorganisms to forests of kelp that grow a foot a day, algae are useful and fascinating—but often undervalued and misunderstood.

With St. Patrick's Day looming large more than a handful of people are contemplating beer and how to best use it.  Now if I were making a list of things to do with beer, numbers 1 through 9 would be to drink it.  But slot #10 would actually be how to cook with it.  And as Chef Jerry Pellegriono of Schola Cooking Schol notes, we use various liquids in millions of recipes, why not use beer?

Off the top of his head, Jerry came up with four great uses for beer in cooking:beer batters, especially tempura, which takes advantage of beer's carbonation; braising liquids which utilize beer's natural acidity; in stew and chili recipes, which like the richness of a darker beer; and in baking where you can take advantage of some of the exotic flavors that are found in today's beer.

Expanding Telemedicine

Mar 13, 2018
KEITH WELLER

Dr. Redonda Miller, president of The Johns Hopkins Hospital, tells us how telemedicine is bringing quality care to patients.

Breakfast

Mar 11, 2018

This week on "Foreman and Wolf on Food and Wine" it's all about breakfast: eggs, pancakes, pork, grits, and a Chef's Challenge.

The outdoor recreation economy, African-Americans in the economy, consumer debt and productivity growth. 

Jump Rope (Encore)

Mar 9, 2018
Steven Depolo/flickr

The Great Mystery Show

Mar 9, 2018
Courtesy of Peter Eglington

“Who am I?” “Is there an afterlife?” Science, philosophy, religion, and art have converged to answer some of life’s biggest questions, many of which we still don’t have answers to. The Great Mystery Show at the American Visionary Art Museum celebrates the unknown, the imagination and the search for answers. Rebecca Hoffberger, the museum’s founder and director, tells us more about the exhibit.

"Ten Bears"

Mar 8, 2018

In 1975, The Morgan State University Lacrosse team defeated Washington " Lee in the biggest upset in NCAA Lacrosse history.

To stretch out one’s retirement savings, one may have to eventually move to a lower cost city. Many people from the northeast United States end up moving to the American South, with one of the major factors being warmer weather. But that’s hardly the only factor. States like North and South Carolina tend to have costs of living far beneath what one contends with in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey or Maryland.  One of the difficulties in understanding differential costs of living in various areas is a dearth of comparable data.

Christy Wyskiel, adviser to the president of Johns Hopkins University tells us why Baltimore is a hub for bio and tech innovation. 

The National Aquarium

When looking to make a positive conservation impact, start in the heart of your home. Your kitchen is full of opportunities for going greener. Here are some simple suggestions. 

Funding for the Arts

Mar 7, 2018
The Walters Art Museum

Julia Marciari-Alexander, Executive Director of the Walters Art Museum, discusses the importance of funding for the arts.

Media Matters

For more than a quarter century, the Bay Journal has been a respected voice on the Chesapeake Bay cleanup effort, funded in part through grants from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Then last spring, the journal published stories about the Trump Administration’s proposed deep cuts to EPA and how they would damage the Chesapeake Bay cleanup. In response, a political appointee in the Trump Administration decided that EPA’s $325,000 annual payments to the Bay Journal would be abruptly terminated in the second year of a six-year contract.

The Trump appointee, John Konkus, said: “the American people have major concerns with newspapers and the media,” according to a report by Greenwire. And so Konkus, an EPA communications official who also works as a media consultant for Republican political campaigns, saw no reason for EPA to keep funding the Bay Journal.

In a Senate committee hearing, Maryland Senator Ben Cardin, a Democrat, grilled EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt about what appeared to be a politically motivated attack on the freedom of the press.

 

The Shrew

Mar 7, 2018

I was walking in the woods last week when I saw a small, furry flash race across the ground. It was too small to be a squirrel, and a little too big to be a mouse. I thought that I might have seen a mole, but this animal had small feet and lacked the flappy scuttling motion that a mole’s oversized feet would make. I stood there, puzzled by what I had seen. Was it a rat? What was it? Upon further reflection, I remembered the animal’s long snout and beady eyes. It was then that I realized I hadn’t seen a mouse or a rat or a mole…I had seen a shrew.

Ben’s Basketball Dreams

Mar 7, 2018

A brain injury can happen to a child in a matter of seconds, changing their life forever. Dr. Stacy Suskauer from Kennedy Krieger’s Center for Brain Injury Recovery shares a story about Ben, a boy whose life changed in an instant at the age of 10 when a car struck the bike he was riding. Hear how Ben was determined to play a sport he loves again, and have a college life, despite a traumatic brain injury.

Cry Like a Baby

Mar 7, 2018

Babies cry….a lot. But did you know they cry in womb too? A mother’s stress just may be effect how much.

Pages