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WYPR Features

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

Blue crabs are an important part of the Chesapeake region’s culture, diet, and economy. But crab remains are rare in archeological sites around the Bay. This has led some scientists to believe that Native Americans did not eat the beautiful swimmers that today we find so delicious.

"What we know about Native Americans ate is based on some historic records, but also on looking at the trash piles that Indians left, mostly on the shoreline of Chesapeake Bay," said Tuck Hines, Director of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. "And the majority of those trash piles are made up of oyster shells. But not much in the way of blue crab remains are generally found in those trash piles or 'middens.'"

 

Postpartum depression affects an estimated one out of nine women. These new moms must not only must acclimate to raising a newborn child, but also with the symptoms of this newfound depression. That’s no small feat.

Maison Ogier/Facebook

Al and Hugh recommend some Ogier wines from the complex Rhone Valley. 

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review three new books that explore the idea of immortality. Who doesn't want to live forever?

Mushrooms

Feb 13, 2018
Andrejus Garkusa/flickr

Underneath the earth, spanning hundreds of miles below our feet, is a massive colony. Often referred to as the “internet of fungus”, this vast system of roots has the ability to connect with plants several miles away. Mycelium, the living body of a mushroom, is made up of a web of tiny filaments. It allows fungi, and other species, to communicate with each other. It helps plants receive water and nutrients and it can even help protect plants against certain infections. While all of this is happening below the ground, the mushroom we see above the earth is just as fascinating.

Winter Tapas

Feb 13, 2018
Jessica Spengler/flickr

Having been in Spain last Spring, Al came back with all sorts of ideas about serving tapas to his friends when they came over.  One might think tapas are warm weather concepts to, but it ain't necessarily so. There are cold winters in Spain, but that doesn't mean the tapas hibernate. 

The National Aquarium

From record storm surges in Texas to rampant wildfires in California, the news about climate change is, quite frankly, a little scary. Listen in to learn how to empower kids to mature into conservation-savvy adults.  

The Growth of the Inner Harbor

Feb 13, 2018

Michael Hankin, president and CEO at Brown Advisory, describes how downtown Baltimore has grown to be "integral to our identity" as a city, and discusses the 'Inner Harbor 2.0' project. 

apox apox/flickr

Hector walks us through a major accreditation program for physicians, health care plans and medical groups provided by the National Committee for Quality Assurance.

Voting on the Aquarium

Feb 9, 2018

On the evening of November 2, 1976, Baltimoreans were glued to their TV and radios—following the election results of Question 3 on the ballot—whether or not the city should build and operate what would be known as the National Aquarium in the Inner Harbor. It was a controversial idea from the outset, with City Councilman Emerson Julian calling the proposed aquarium, derisively, “nothing but a fish tank.” This is the story of how that so-called “fish tank” became one of the most visited tourist attraction in the world.

Also: Job loss due to automation and the coffee economy. 

Click the image for the Reports for the week of February 5.

All of us have grown up understanding the concept of retirement. The notion is very simple – we work, we save, and then we stop working and enjoy a whole lot of free time during which we take care of grandchildren, golf, knit, travel, or all of the above. But as indicated by Kiplinger, hundreds of years ago, most people didn’t grow old so there was no need to retire.  People often worked to survive until they were simply unable to work any longer...

Mike Janke, co-founder of Data Tribe, tells us why his company has invested in Baltimore, and why tech companies can flourish here. 

Baltimore Life Under Jim Crow

Feb 8, 2018

How can stories of desegregation during the Jim Crow era influence current policies around race, segregation, and opportunity in America in 2018 and beyond? Towson Professors Gary Homana and Morna McDermott explore this question, and preserve the stories of seven African-Americans who grew up Baltimore during the Jim Crow Era, in their documentary Voices of Baltimore: Life under Segregation.

The Billings Gazette

Last week, the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee held a hearing on the Trump Administration’s management of the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Chairman John Barrasso, a Republican from Wyoming, made a case frequently repeated by the administration: that by eliminating environmental regulations and slashing the budget and power of EPA, President Trump had unleashed job growth and a booming economy.

“The administration’s deregulatory approach is working,” Barrasso said. “According to the last Energy Information Administration quarterly report, coal production in the West is 19.7 percent higher than in the second quarter of 2016.  In addition, the stock market is reaching record, all-time highs.”

That cheerleading faded a bit over the next few days when the stock market plummeted.

Economist Roger Bezdek said it would be wrong to credit President Trump for either the rise in the market – which actually began under President Obama – or blame him for its sudden fall.

Turning adversity into advocacy

Feb 7, 2018

Greg is a young adult who, as a teen, was diagnosed at Kennedy Krieger with a rare, currently incurable, neurogenetic disorder. Greg has turned his adversity into motivation to help others.

Dr. Ali Fatemi, Director of Kennedy Krieger’s Division of Neurogenetics, shares how Gregg is educating physicians about rare disorders like his and encouraging families to seek diagnoses from experts, like those at Kennedy Krieger.

Children have been sitting in front of screens ever since the advent of television. From TVs to smart phones and laptops to LeapFrogs children and adults are fascinated by the near endless possibilities of these devices...

Before he made a name for himself in the vaudeville scene in New York, Eubie “Mouse” Blake got his start playing honkytonk music in the pool halls, saloons, and brothels of East Baltimore.

Alaska, Ho!

Feb 7, 2018

On today's episode, we review two new novels that put the "wild" in the Alaska wilderness.

Cameron Kennedy/flickr

Al and Hugh discuss some interesting Grenache wines from France. 

Destination: Baltimore

Feb 6, 2018

Samuel Hoi, president of MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art,) on Baltimore's growing prominence as a visitor destination.

Pea Crabs

Feb 6, 2018
FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/flickr

Excuse me waiter, there’s a pea crab in my oyster…If you’ve ever opened an oyster and found a little orange crab inside, consider yourself lucky! Many seafood lovers have called this tiny, spider-like crab a delicious surprise for many years. In fact, an article in The New York Times from 1913 recalls a story of a restaurant patron who sent his soup back with disgust upon finding a small orange “critter” in it. He was not aware that the tiny crab that had turned his stomach was a highly-prized delicacy - back in 1913, pea crabs sold for $2 a portion, which is roughly $50 today! Even George Washington was well documented as a fan of this fine food. So, what exactly is a pea crab?

The National Aquarium

Mysterious, misunderstood jellyfish are swimming right in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Let's take a look at what their presence indicates and how climate change is playing a role. 

This episode originally aired in March 2017. 

Tasha/flickr

Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School and I invited a long-time friend of the show, Liz Nuttle to come on and tell us how the creative application of oils and vinegars can make a huge difference.

Say oil and most people think olive oil, especially the authentic extra virgin kind.  But most oils come not from fruit (which the olive is) but from nuts and seeds.  Some of the most popular include our favorite, roasted sesame seed oil, almond oil, hazelnut oil, sunflower oil, grape seed oil, macadamia nut oil, peanut oil, pumpkin seed oil, soybean oil, flaxseed oil, and walnut oil.

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

A new study by the Transamerica Institute highlights the promises and pitfalls faced by 'Baby Boomers,' Generation X-ers and Millennials. As these younger groups could live longer lives, Catherine shares what the implications could be for retirement. 

Also for the week of February 2, American fertility rates. 

Zöe Charlton

Feb 2, 2018

Chris Bedford and Baltimore-based artist Zöe Charlton discuss the meanings behind her surreal life-size figurative drawings and how people relate to images of bodies.

McKeldin's Speech

Feb 1, 2018

On the summer night of July 11, 1962 at the Republican National Convention in Chicago, those in the hall and millions watching television saw and heard Theodore R. McKeldin, former Mayor of Baltimore and incumbent Governor of Maryland, nominate General Dwight David Eisenhower for president of the United States...

Venroy July, Counsel for Miles and Stockbridge on what draws people to Baltimore, and what makes them stay.

We’ve spoken repeatedly about the notion that you would likely be better off financially in retirement if you worked for more years and waited to begin claiming Social Security.  Not only does working longer allow one to save more money for retirement, but delaying the receipt of Social Security benefits increases the value of monthly benefits.  Here’s another reason to hold off collecting those Social Security checks – if you retire early, you are more likely to die earlier as well...

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