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WYPR Features

Saving the Bay

Oct 17, 2017
Michael Busada

Will Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation discusses the organization's efforts to protect the bay.

zeevveez/flickr

Catherine shares some new research on caregivers.

Click on the image for the MER's the week of October 9. 

www.personalcreations.com

Do you know any four-year-olds who might actually be superheroes? What about a three-year-old who is a master chef? In the quickly developing mind of a young child these possibilities are as real as can be. A multitude of new research shows overwhelming benefits of a child’s make-believe play.

Unpaid Eldercare

Oct 13, 2017

For a growing share of older Americans, retirement may be approaching, but so too is a new job:  unpaid care for the elderly...

Rob Crim

Oct 13, 2017

The BioHealth Innovation Index compared Central Maryland’s innovation cluster with the most prolific in the country, including Boston, Pittsburgh, and San Diego. Home to more than 70 federal labs, numerous research institutions, and more than 275,000 people working in the BioHealth industries—the region ranked #1 in talent, based on concentration of workers and level of education. Joining us today for Why Baltimore is Rob Crim, President and CEO of Vaya Pharma USA, a UMB BioPark company that makes medical food products to manage nutritional imbalances.

Death of an Arabber

Oct 13, 2017
Andrew Hazlett/flickr

On July 23, 2017, four horse-and-wagons formed a funeral cortege at the entrance to the Wylie Funeral Home at 701 Mt. Street. Crowds had gathered to say goodbye to Eugene Allen, among the last of Baltimore’s street Arabbers, who with their memorable yells, sold fruits and vegetables off of their horse and wagons. We may have lost Mr. Allen but, cherishing horse and wagon selling in Baltimore, we have his yells.

Arabber calls (originally aired in 1989) provided by All Things Considered.

Winston Frazer

Oct 13, 2017

Winston Frazer, President and CEO of Danae Prosthetics joins us for today's '"Why Baltimore."

"Hound Dog"

Oct 12, 2017

The story behind the hit song and its tie to Baltimore. 

Grab Bag of Bottles

Oct 12, 2017
Stewart Butterfield/flickr

This week, Hugh and Al talk about wines produced by folks who are known for something else.

Edible Plants

Oct 12, 2017
Chris Luczkow/flickr

My kids used to gather a bucket full of plants and twigs they foraged from our backyard and offer it to me and my wife as “soup.” While most of those ingredients were inedible, you’d be surprised how many were edible and rich in vitamins and minerals! Their favorite food to serve, and most easily harvested, was Dandelions. I can remember the shock on their faces when I put the whole thing, stem and flower, in my mouth, chewed and then swallowed.

Manatees

Oct 12, 2017
aqua.org/blog

These gentle giants have rebounded in recent years, making their way off the endangered species list, but we must be vigilant to protect their resurgence. Let’s check in with manatees.   

Connecting with Students through Literature

Oct 12, 2017
Brittany Lindsey

Soup - a liquid dish, typically made by boiling meat, fish, or vegetables, etc., in stock or water  

That cool snap in the air is so welcome after a particularly hot summer.  And it may be my imagination but I think that cool air carries the aroma of cooking food in a way that puts a smile on my face.  This is the time for soup making, ideally a day-long process that puts a keen edge on your appetite. Here are some of Jerry and Chef Amy von Lange's ideas for simple soups.

Cleaning Up the Harbor

Oct 11, 2017

Michael "Mike" Hankin, President and CEO at Brown Advisory tells us about the efforts to clean up Baltimore's harbor, which he plans to swim across in 2020.

Almost every Irish Catholic friend I can think of has a “crazy nun story.” On this edition of "The Weekly Reader," we feature books about nuns, including Alice McDermott’s latest, "The Ninth Hour" and "Saints for All Occasions," the fourth novel by J. Courtney Sullivan. 

Tom Pelton

Most consumers know the ‘buy local’ and 'organic' labels for produce. But not everyone knows that just because something is grown locally and organically does not mean it is good for the Chesapeake Bay.

After all, factory-farmed chicken from Maryland’s Eastern Shore is local, but organic manure from this industry and Pennsylvania dairy farms are major sources of water pollution.  People who want to pick food that is healthy for both the bay and their bodies should consider supporting visionary farmers who are also dedicated to clean water.  That would include farmers like Brett Grohsgal, 56, who has been running the Even’ Star Organic Farm in southern Maryland for almost 20 years.

Instead of growing vast fields of a monoculture – like corn or soybeans –  Grohsgal allows half of his 100 acres in St. Mary’s County to remain forested.  And he aggressively rotates 70 different crops -- including cucumber, sweet potatoes and flowers -- from plot to plot on much of his remaining land. To protect the health of the two streams that flow through his property, he planted rows of black locust trees and loblolly pines to act as natural water filters.

Grohsgal is part of the new "Fair Farms" movement in Maryland.  Fair Farms is an alliance of 90 farmers, environmental organizations and farmers that supports growers who are not only organic, but also using practices like forested buffers along streams, which many conventional farmers do not use.

Medicare.gov via AP

Hector tells us about a Medicare change that has "nothing to with what you're hearing in Washington." 

Joy/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.   

As the weather begins to chill, Tony and Chef Cindy talk about soups and the challenge of matching them with wine. We hear from Eva Dehlinger of Dehlinger Winery about her favorite soup and wine pairings.

HK Elevators

Oct 6, 2017
Steve Snodgrass/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.   

On a Saturday afternoon in 1946, on an elevator in the popular downtown department store, Hochschild Kohn, a uniformed elevator operator was calling out to passengers, “Fourth  floor, Ladies dresses, special sale today!” An elevator operator selling merchandise while calling out floors? So beloved was this custom that when the store installed automatic elevators, they had to call the operators back. To call out floors and merchandise!

Abolitionist "Captain" John Brown made quite an impression on Frederick Douglass when they met, but, while bound by the same passion, 

the two men went on to fight to end slavery by very different means. 

Better Living Through the Humanities

Oct 5, 2017

What is the importance of the humanities to the future of our nation? Dr. Jim Salvucci, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Buena Vista University offers this reflection of how the humanities bring meaning to our lives.

There is a notion there when people retire, their spending immediately plunges. After all, retirement implies a rapid transition to fixed income, including perhaps income from Social Security. But it doesn’t work like that. For many people, retirement appears to be a multi-year transition rather than representing a discrete point in time...  

Tom Pelton

In the early 19th century there was a Baltimore tavern owner and merchant named Joseph Hart. He had his own, unconventional way of looking at the world – and he did not trust banks.

He was also somewhat strange and secretive. And so all of the money that he earned from his tavern, he snuck offshore in a boat and buried on a tiny, marshy island east of Essex, at the mouth of the Back River in the Chesapeake Bay.

As legend had it, the tavern owner – in his legitimate business dealings or otherwise – also somehow came into possession of a barrel full of gold pieces.  And so he also buried that on what became known as Hart Island.


Economists agree: investing in early childhood saves money. 

marylandwine.com

Al and Hugh discuss some of the winning wines in the Maryland Governor's Cup Competition. Click on the image for the list. 

Click on the image for the list.

Bryan Maleszyk/flickr

We're in the middle of our harvest season, when farmers all over Maryland are bringing in the food they've worked so hard to produce.  In Italy this season is celebrated with the Feast of San Martino, who quite logically is the patron saint of grape pickers, winemakers and sommeliers. So to fill us in on this festival, we've invited a friend whose knowledge and understanding of this Feast is first rate, Chef Sergio Vitale of Aldo's Restaurant in  Little Italy. Chef Sergio gave us a few ideas for celebrating San Martino. Here they are.

Aquaculture

Oct 3, 2017
BRIAN GRATWICKE/FLICKR

We all want to do what's best for our ocean planet but we're drowning in choices. And consumers are asking 'what is best?' In this episode, John sheds some light on seafood and aquaculture.

Confronting the Sites of Confederate Monuments

Oct 3, 2017
MICA

Samuel Hoi, president of the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, offers a follow-up plan for what to do with the vacant sites of Confederate monuments. 

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