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Rachel Baye

 

As many as 80,000 voters may have to cast provisional ballots in Tuesday’s primary as a result of a glitch in computer software installed last year by the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration.

The last day of campaigning for Baltimore City State’s Attorney has turned heated. Candidates are leaving nothing to chance.

apox apox/flickr

What’s in a couple of letters behind a man’s name?

Well, in sports, those letters Jr. or Sr. can tell a story of sustained excellence.

Four years ago, former Ravens wide receiver Steve Smith added the letters Sr. to his jersey to reflect his status as the paterfamilias in a group where his younger son, Steve, may follow the old man and his big brother, Peyton, into the family business.

Rachel Baye

A record 222,000 voters cast ballots during the early voting period that ended Thursday. About six percent of eligible, active voters cast ballots early, a slight increase over early voting during the last gubernatorial primary in 2014, but a slight decrease from the presidential primary in 2016.

About 49,000 Marylanders — one in every five who voted early — cast their ballots on Thursday. About 5 percent of Republican voters and about 8 percent of Democrats cast ballots.

Baltimore Police Department

 

Convicted former Baltimore police detective Daniel Hesl was sentenced to 18 years in federal prison today. U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake ordered the sentence for the former Gun Trace Task Force officer after she denied his request for a new trial.

John Lee

Baltimore County Republican Councilman Wade Kach has been accused of grandstanding and fiscal recklessness by fellow council members and administration officials. Kach who is running for his second term, scoffs at the accusations.

 

 

John Lee

In the closing days of the hotly contested race for the Democratic nomination for Baltimore County Executive, Councilwoman Vicki Almond is getting financial backing from a well-known developer. 

 

One of Almond’s opponents, State Senator Jim Brochin, said that makes his case that she is in the developers’ pocket. Almond countered her integrity is being attacked unfairly.

 

 

Photo Courtesy Jim Shea for Maryland

Jim Shea has an impressive resume—successful lawyer, chair of the University System of Maryland Board of Regents—but he’s never held public office. Nonetheless, he says he’s the only one in the crowded Democratic gubernatorial primary field, who can beat incumbent Governor Larry Hogan in November.

Mary Rose Madden

Ben Jealous has had the advantage in Maryland’s Democratic gubernatorial primary of having prominent national figures show up to stump for him. There were senators Bernie Sanders, Cory Booker and Kamala Harris as well as comedian Dave Chapelle.

And he’s won the endorsements of liberal leaning national organizations, like SEIU and Friends of the Earth.

Yet he styles himself as a guy who spent childhood summers with his grandmother in West Baltimore.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Last week Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh introduced multiple charter amendments to the city council for review. Yesterday Pugh withdrew all but one charter amendment. Morning Edition Host Nathan Sterner talks with City Hall Reporter Dominique Maria Bonessi.

@TheRealJMcNair/Twitter

There are questions that need answering in the wake of the death last week of former University of Maryland football player Jordan McNair.

Some of those questions may not be resolved until an external review is conducted by the athletic department, but there’s one question that doesn’t need to wait for any review and ought to be the first one to be answered:

Exactly what was McNair or any of his teammates doing on a practice field on May 29?

John Lee

 

Early voting is under way and Baltimore County residents will for the first time elect some of the members of the school board. The way it’s being done can be confusing, but there are those who think electing school board members is the key to mending the current, fractured board. WYPR’s John Lee joined Nathan Sterner in the studio to talk about it.

 

 

Maryland House of Delegates

The state legislature’s ethics committee is investigating Baltimore City House Delegation Chair Curt Anderson for alleged sexual misconduct.

Things are looking up for the Chesapeake Bay, according to scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

The scientists released a report card on the bay’s health Friday morning that found the "positive trajectory" they’ve noted in recent years is now "statistically significant."

Ivan Bates Campaign, Marilyn Mosby Campaign, and Thiru Vignarajah Campaign.

The race for Baltimore State’s Attorney has become one of the most contentious in the city’s history, and it’s anyone’s guess who will win the top prosecutor’s job.

John Lee

The race for the Republican nomination for Baltimore County Executive pits an establishment candidate with the governor’s seal of approval against a self-described crusader who is counting on votes from Trump supporters. The battle between State Insurance Commissioner Al Redmer Junior and Delegate Pat McDonough has been contentious.

Rachel Baye

Former Montgomery County Council Member Valerie Ervin is dropping out of the governor’s race and endorsing Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker, she announced Wednesday.

Recent Immigrants Shut Out of Elite High Schools

Jun 13, 2018

Updated 3:32 p.m., 06-14-18

While Baltimore’s schools are losing students every year, there is one population that is growing rapidly: students whose first language isn’t English. But many of those students are shut out of the elite city high schools.

Now, a group of Latinx students at Baltimore City College is trying to change that.

Rachel Baye

Four Democratic candidates for governor and three for lieutenant governor discussed education policy at a forum Tuesday night hosted by the Real News Network in Baltimore.

The forum’s focus was the state panel studying how to revise Maryland’s education funding formulas and modernize the state’s approach to education more broadly. The group is known as the Kirwan Commission because it’s led by University System of Maryland Chancellor Emeritus Brit Kirwan. It plans to publish its recommendations at the end of the year, and they are expected to come with a large price tag.

Mosby: 'Nothing to Hide' on Conviction Rate

Jun 12, 2018

Incumbent Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby has come under fire from her challengers for supposedly exaggerating her conviction rate. But Mosby insisted during an appearance on WYPR's Midday Monday that she’s not hiding anything.

Mosby has been touting a 90-plus percent conviction rate ahead of the June 26 primary. But her challengers say that rate doesn’t count cases she had to drop and that distorts the picture.

 

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Five bills were introduced at Monday night’s Baltimore City Council meeting that would bring major changes to the city’s charter. WYPR’s Dominique Maria Bonessi spoke with Morning Edition Host Nathan Sterner about the changes.

@Capitals/Twitter

How do you quantify frustration, in a sports context?

How much pain and ache can a heart take over a team’s repeated failures?

And how long do you wait for success before you give up hope?

For hockey fans in this region, those questions have seemed to have no answers since the day in 1974 when the Washington Capitals began play in the NHL.

Rachel Baye

Democratic state Sen. Richard Madaleno has known he wanted to run for office since he was 9 years old.

Mary Rose Madden / wypr

Baltimore’s police department was already notorious (see the 2016 DOJ report).   

But this year, eight former police officers were convicted on federal racketeering charges stemming from an FBI investigation. They belonged to an elite task force charged with getting guns off the city’s streets. Instead, the plainclothes cops roamed Baltimore neighborhoods at will, robbing people on the street, breaking into homes to steal money, drugs or guns and planting evidence on their victims.   

Corrupt Cops Get Stiff Sentences

Jun 8, 2018

Two members of the Baltimore Police Department’s disbanded Gun Trace Task Force were sentenced to lengthy prison terms Thursday for a host of crimes ranging from racketeering to wire fraud.

U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake sentenced Sgt. Wayne Jenkins, a leader of the disgraced task force, to 25 years, five years less than the maximum prosecutors had requested. She sentenced Marcus Taylor, one of only two members of the unit to stand trial, to 18 years.

John Lee

Construction is getting under way on the controversial $350 million Towson Row project after years of delay. Once it’s done, it will be home for shops, offices, student housing, residences and a hotel. The project is considered the transformational centerpiece of Towson’s redevelopment. But only one of the candidates running for Baltimore County Executive  supports it.

 

 

Photo courtesy BCPS

The Baltimore County School Board Thursday night voted to make Verletta White the Interim School Superintendent for another year, beginning July 1. The vote was 8-4, with the board divided between the majority that wanted to make White the permanent superintendent, and the minority that opposes her.

 

 

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

The nine Democrats running for governor faced off Wednesday in their fourth debate, which was taped and will air on WMAR-2 News on June 13 at 8 p.m. WYPR’s Rachel Baye discusses the debate with Nathan Sterner.

John Lee

The Baltimore County School Board meets Thursday evening to talk about naming an interim school superintendent for the next year. The issue of whether the current interim superintendent, Verletta White, should remain on the job is dividing not only the school board, but the candidates running for county executive as well.

 

 

Eric Minor

By the end of this week, five of the eight convicted cops from the Baltimore Police Department's disbanded Gun Trace Task Force will have been sentenced and could be serving anywhere from 10 to 30 years in federal prison.

Six of them pleaded guilty and two were found guilty by a jury on federal charges of racketeering, conspiracy to racketeer and wire fraud for falsifying overtime claims. The case has left some wondering why it took federal, rather than local, Baltimore  authorities to catch this crew.  

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