WYPR News

News coverage, Series and Commentary from WYPR's award winning news staff.

Train derailment prompts push for safety study

Jun 19, 2016

After a CSX train carrying Acetone, a chemical used in paint thinner, derailed Monday morning, activists renewed calls for Baltimore officials to study the risks of oil trains traveling through the city.

The bill requiring the studies has been in a City Council committee since it was introduced in January.

Baltimore vigil honors Orlando shooting victims

Jun 14, 2016

A few hundred people gathered in Baltimore’s Station North neighborhood Monday night for a vigil honoring the 49 people killed at a gay night club in Orlando Sunday.  

  Police Officer William Porter testified Monday that Officer Caesar Goodson said, “Sure,” when Porter suggested he take Freddie Gray to the hospital on April 12, 2015.

John Lee

  Gerald Ford, the 38th President, owes his place in history to the fact that Spiro Agnew was a crook. So when the newly renovated Ford Presidential Museum reopened in Grand Rapids Michigan last week, you would have thought they would show the man from Maryland, who made it all possible, a little love. But, no.

Fraser Smith and Bryan Sears, who covers the state house for the Daily Record, talk about Governor Larry Hogan's recent vetoes and the prospects that the General Assembly will override them next year.  

Prosecutors charged Thursday that Freddie Gray was injured because he got a “rough ride” on the way to the Western District police station at the hands of Officer Caesar Goodson.

Gray died from that injury – a broken neck – a week after his arrest in April 2015. Goodson is on trial in Gray’s death.

 

When the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six charged in the Freddie Gray case, begins Thursday morning at Courthouse East, prosecutors will be at a distinct disadvantage.

Circuit Judge Barry Williams ruled during pre-trial motions that prosecutors cannot mention a phone call between Officer William Porter and an investigator in the case in which Porter said he told Goodson that Gray “couldn’t breathe.”

Baltimore’s school system has embarked on an ambitious project to renovate, replace and combine dozens of the oldest schools in the state over the next four years.   

The $1 billion effort aims to shutter and combine dozens of schools and renovate or replace at least 23 – all by the spring of 2021.  

A 2012 report by the Jacobs Project Management Company, a consulting firm, found that 85 percent, or 138 of the schools are in “poor” or “very poor” condition.

    

Fraser Smith and Luke Broadwater, of the Baltimore Sun's City Hall bureau, talk about the possibility of a city government shutdown if city council members don't get what they want.

A power issue at Baltimore City schools headquarters on North Avenue has knocked the system’s web site off line and snarled some plans for final exams.  

School employees, who wouldn’t give their names, say some teachers can’t get into the online tools they need to administer finals and two teachers said there were delays in administering Maryland’s High School Assessments or HSAs due to internet issues.

Headquarters school employees say the power went out at about noon yesterday, forcing them to evacuate the building through dark stairwells without the aid of an intercom system or emergency lighting.

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