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John Lee

Sparrows Point, once the home to Bethlehem Steel in Southeast Baltimore County, is starting to come back to life. And more than a year into the Point’s rebirth, there are already hundreds of jobs on site, due in part to what the steel-making giant left behind. Back in January, officials announced that Fed Ex would be the first major tenant at the Point, with plans to build a distribution center. It’s expected to open in the spring with about 150 employees. A few weeks ago, Under Armour said it was going to build an e-commerce distribution center with about 1,000 employees expected.

Rachel Baye

In a speech in Baltimore Monday afternoon, Donald Trump promised the National Guard Association of the United States that he would support military growth and defeat ISIS if elected president.

P. Kenneth Burns

The Baltimore City Council gave preliminary approval Monday to a tax financing package for the proposed Port Covington development project. The package is expected to pass a final vote at the council’s next meeting Sept. 19. But Monday’s vote didn’t come before some members said they were concerned about how one of the bills – authorizing $660 million in tax bonds – was moved out of committee and to the full council.

P. Kenneth Burns

The Baltimore City Council will get a look Monday at all three bills that are part of the largest tax financing package for a development project in city history. That’s because Councilman Eric Costello led efforts to wrest the bill authorizing bonds for the Port Covington project out of its committee.

Being a first year teacher often means instructing with limited classroom experience and Baltimore City Public Schools, like many urban school districts, has more inexperienced teachers than suburban school districts. A local program, called Urban Teachers, grown out of former educators’ experience working in Baltimore’s central office, is trying to change that. Ms. Tierra Woods is greeting her 4 th grade math class as they shuffle into their seats. She’s a first year teacher, but this isn’t her first time leading a class.

P. Kenneth Burns

A Baltimore City Council committee voted Thursday night to send two bills to the full city council as part of a tax financing package for the Port Covington project. The first bill designates the development district while the other creates the tax district for the South Baltimore project. The vote on the third bill to authorize $660 million in tax bonds did not take place. That’s because Councilman Carl Stokes, the committee chair, wanted to give interested parties time for further review. He ended the meeting without calling for a vote on the bond measure.

John Lee

Grove Miller is a retired Cecil County farmer. Much has changed since Miller started farming. “I started farming with horses,” Miller says. “The first tractor I bought was a John Deere H, which now, most lawn mowers have more horse power than that tractor I bought.” Something else has changed. These days, farmers in Maryland think they are getting a bad rap and it goes something like this. Even though agriculture is the number one commercial industry in the state, you don’t hear much about farmers. And when you do, it usually has something to do with polluting the bay.

Tom Chalkley

WYPR's senior news analyst says it's about time somebody--in this case the Baltimore Health Commissioner--came up with a plan to improve the health of Baltimore's citizens.

Hot schools a hot issue in Dundalk and Essex

Sep 1, 2016
John Lee

On a particularly hot day this week, Heather Garner and Drew Lee were hashing out whether to send their son, James, a fourth grader at Bear Creek Elementary, to school. Lee checked a weather app to get the forecast, and found that the expected high temperature for the day was 92 degrees. And even though the un-air-conditioned classrooms would be sweltering, Bear Creek, in Dundalk, would be open.

P. Kenneth Burns

The Baltimore Board of Estimates approved Wednesday a multi-year increase in city water and sewer rates. The board took the action after a nearly three hour public hearing in which everyone who testified opposed the increase. The vote was 3-2. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake along with her appointees; Public Works Director Rudy Chow and Interim City Solicitor David Ralph, voted for the increase. City Council President Jack Young and Comptroller Joan Pratt opposed it. The mayor said the city’s water infrastructure has been “languishing for decades;” that the “can has been kicked down the road” and it needs to be modernized.

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