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WYPR Podcast

all photos by Wendel Patrick

Essential Tremors - Susan Alcorn

Apr 20, 2018

Susan Alcorn spent years playing her pedal-steel guitar in country bands across Texas. But she has also taken the instrument into less typical territory, applying its sinuous tones to jazz, free improvisation, tango, and her personal blend of all of the above. In this episode, she recalls her seminal encounters with 20th-century composition, free jazz, and a steel-player’s steel player.

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela: An Appreciation

Apr 11, 2018
Photo Courtesy Sahisotry.org.za

Today, a reflection on the work and legacy of the late Winnie Madikezela-Mandela, a fierce advocate for social justice who was considered by many South Africans to be the mother of their nation.  

She is widely revered in South Africa and around the African continent for her relentless fight against the South African apartheid system which, for nearly 50 years, subjected the native Black population to violence, intimidation and segregation.

Winnie Madikizela Mandela died last Monday at the age of 81. 

Dr. Emira Woods joins us in Studio A.  Dr. Woods is a  scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, and a member of the International Working Group for Africans Rising, a network of African social justice movements. 

Joining us from Boston is Dr. Xolela Mangcu.  He’s a Professor of Sociology at the University of Cape Town, and  the author and co-author of nine books, including a biography of the late anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

The 200 block of W Read Street was Baltimore’s ground zero for hippies, head shops, gay nightlife, and wild fashion.  In this episode, we explore the past and present of the neighborhood with a vintage clothier, a husband-and-husband duo that runs a hair salon, a father and son who operate a 70-year-old key shop, and a guy who loves to smoke a good cigar.

hummusforthought.com

The classic Noir films of the 1940s and 50s – black and white mysteries noted for their moral ambiguity, tough-talking detectives, and classic femme fatales – seem to epitomize Old Hollywood glamour. Yet, these films were often operating on very low budgets, relying on the allure of Noir tropes to retain an audience. We’ll talk with film expert Marc Sober about some of the classics of the genre.

Dogs in the ICU at Johns Hopkins

Apr 4, 2018
JH Medicine

Elizabeth and Charlie talk about dogs and their healing value in the ICU at Johns Hopkins.

Chinatown ID, Seattle, part 2

Mar 26, 2018
all photos by Wendel Patrick

Devotion to family.  That’s the overarching theme in this episode, as we return to Seattle’s Chinatown International District once more to visit with sons and daughters who are committed to honoring and preserving their families’ legacies. 

Creative Commons/Flickr

On this month’s episode, Host Lisa Haynes discusses a remarkable time in the history of Baltimore city with the redevelopment of the Inner Harbor. Her guest is Roland Park Place Resident, Mr. Martin Millspaugh, a life-long resident of Baltimore and one of the master developers of the Inner Harbor project.

Essential Tremors - Ian MacKaye

Mar 20, 2018

Ian MacKaye has exerted a profound influence on music over the past 35 years. He pioneered hardcore punk with Minor Threat. He expanded the possibilities of punk with Fugazi. And he co-founded seminal Washington, DC, indie label Dischord Records.  For this episode of Essential Tremors, he sat down for a wide-ranging conversation about his history, the influence of dub, and how music is like a room.

Melissa Gerr

It's no secret that water goes through filtration before we drink it, but there’s some crazy stuff that happens, like making it chunky in order to clean it.  This gravity led trip through the Ashburton Water Filtration plant answers all your H2O questions.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

Seattle’s Chinatown International District is a bustling, pan-Asian neighborhood of immigrants from China, Japan, Vietnam, and The Philippines.  It’s also a mix of generations, where Americanized children navigate a complex family dynamic with their non-English speaking elders.  Tradition is in a tug-of-war with modernity on the streets of Chinatown ID, where multi-generational family businesses stand side-by-side with the startups of young, artistic entrepreneurs. It all amounts to a beautiful, mutable monument to the American Dream.  This episode was produced in collaboration with KUOW and made possible by a generous grant from The National Endowment for the Arts.

The romance and horror of Edgar Allan Poe's life and works continues to enthrall people hundreds of years after he was born...On January 19, 2018, hundreds of people gathered at his memorial in Westminster Burial Ground to celebrate his 209th birthday and catch a glimpse of the mysterious Poe Toaster.

Joy In Medicine - Bringing Doctors Back to the Bedside, Pt. 2

Feb 27, 2018
Creative Commons/Flickr

Joy in Medicine looks at ways doctors and everyone involved in medicine can focus on the humanity of practice. Elizabeth and Charles continue the discussion in part 2 around bringing doctors back to the bedside.

Wendel Patrick is the composer, producer and performer of the musical score for every episode of Out of the Blocks. In this special installment, he talks about some of his favorite compositions from the show and delves into how (and why) he makes the music.  Wendel can span musical genres from classical to hip hop with compositions that take the listener on an emotional journey full of surprises:  A cell-phone ringtone symphony? Check. A hair-clipper fugue? Check.  This is a must-listen for aspiring music producers or anyone who wants to hear extended music cuts from Out of the Blocks.

Roger Mecca

On this month’s episode, Host Lisa Haynes discusses a remarkable time in the history of Baltimore city with the redevelopment of the Inner Harbor. Her guest is Roland Park Place Resident, Mr. Martin Millspaugh, a life-long resident of Baltimore and one of the master developers of the Inner Harbor project

Essential Tremors - Wendel Patrick

Feb 20, 2018

Wendel Patrick is a Baltimore-based jazz and classical pianist, as well as a sought after hip-hop producer, a lecturer at Johns Hopkins’ Peabody Institute, and a sound documentarian. He’s also the co-founder of the monthly Baltimore Boom-Bap Society and a co-creator of WYPR’s award-winning "Out of the Blocks" podcast. The three songs that changed him range from seminal hip-hop, to a genre-challenging instrumental, to a soul stirring rendition of a Leonard Bernstein classic by one of the most important performers of the 20th century.

It’s  Midday on Music and today we explore  music as a window into Muslim Culture, and the creative work of Muslim women, who are being celebrated in a series at the Creative Alliance in Baltimore this season called Nisa’a Women.  My guests this afternoon are Sudanese singer Alsarah and her band The Nubatones.  The group is in town as the second installment in the Nisa’a Women series.  They are conducting workshops at local schools, they’ll be at a community potluck for refugee and immigrant communities and they will give a concert at the Creative Alliance tomorrow night.

Later on, a discussion about the growing popularity of Contemporary African music. Despite Hip Hop  and Afrobeats artists dominating music charts around the world, they were not well represented at this year’s Grammy awards.  Stephanie Shonekan, University of Missouri Associate Professor of Black Studies and Ethnomusicologist, joins us on the telephone to discuss who wins awards, who doesn’t and  why.  

Faidley Seafood, located in Baltimore's Lexington Market since 1886, is nationally known for its crab cakes. Meet the cast of characters who hand produce hundreds of them daily for locals and tourists; learn what not to do while shucking oysters and finally, get the definitive answer to that burning question: what really is the difference between jumbo lump vs. back fin?

100 S Broadway, part 3

Feb 12, 2018
all photos by Wendel Patrick

If we’re truthful about it, most of us will admit it:  There’s a gap between who we are and who we yearn to be.  In this episode, people confront the sting of getting honest with themselves.  In the end, some find redemption, and some just stare into the abyss.  There’s darkness in this episode, yes, but rays of hope have a way of shining in through the cracks.  As you’ll hear Francesca say, “Life is too short, the world is too cruel. Just love one another.”

Ouija boards have a strange and complicated history, steeped in myth and legend.  No one's quite sure who truly invented the board, but almost everyone agrees that it was Baltimore-native William Fuld who is responsible for it’s lasting popularity.  Harmless toy or portal for dark forces?  Let's find out.

Human beings want to believe the veil between life and death is a thin one. Some people even believe the dead can speak to them. In the first episode of The Noir and Bizarre, we attend a session with a psychic medium and record her attempts to make contact with a clients’ departed loved ones.

Melissa Gerr

Ever walk by the venerable Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore’s Mt. Vernon neighborhood and wonder what exactly goes on inside? Peabody has been fine-tuning musicians from across the globe for more than 150 years.  Renowned cellist and instructor Amit Peled, along with his student Joseph Staten give us a window into what it’s like to teach and learn at one of the world’s finest music conservatories.

Essential Tremors - Jana Hunter

Feb 1, 2018

Essential Tremors talks to musicians and other creative people about the music that shaped them. In the debut episode, hosts Matt Byars and Lee Gardner speak with Jana Hunter, singer, guitarist, and songwriter for Baltimore indie-pop band Lower Dens. 

Joy In Medicine - Bringing Doctors Back to the Bedside

Feb 1, 2018

Joy in Medicine looks at ways doctors and everyone involved in medicine can focus on the humanity of practice.  In episode 1 a discussion around doctors and how their interaction with patients has changed.

Driven by dares, rumors or just plain curiosity, this podcast is about poking around the city, opening doors and finding out who, or what, lies behind them.

The Noir and Bizarre explores the dark and strange stories we tell ourselves about human existence – occult history, ghosts, haunted houses, and secret crimes - with a special emphasis on stories that draw on the rich history and culture of Baltimore. Additionally, the show philosophically asks big questions about spiritual narratives and rituals surrounding life and death. Episode 1 debuts 2/1/18.

Essential Tremors Trailer

Jan 30, 2018

Essential Tremors talks to musicians and other creative people about the music that shaped them. In the debut episode, hosts Matt Byars and Lee Gardner speak with Jana Hunter, singer, guitarist, and songwriter for Baltimore indie-pop band Lower Dens. Turns out the melancholy in the band's mercurial sound has its roots in Jana's experiences with the music of the Smiths, but also Vivaldi and a certain '70s AM hit.  Episode 1 debuts on 2/1/18.

100 S Broadway, part 2

Jan 29, 2018

This episode begins with a recovering addict who’s found peace, purpose, and a modest income folding paper flowers and peddling them to passersby on the street corner.  The episode ends with a Salvadorian immigrant who spends 50 hours a week on an assembly line in a chicken processing plant.  In between are more stories of entrepreneurs and day-laborers, people trying to make a living and trying to live life along the way.

A Valuable Perspective: Embracing Change

Jan 10, 2018

On this month’s episode, Host Lisa Haynes discusses dealing with various changes in life. The guests are Mrs. Catherine Beyer and Mr. Ernest Ritenhouse, both residents of Roland Park Place as they share stories about some of the changes in their life and how they learned to overcome the fear of change and started to embrace it.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

A spectrum of stories exploring the creative impulse: from an emcee, a sculptor, a muralist, a florist, and others in Baltimore’s Station North neighborhood. This special episode was originally commissioned as a sound installation for the 2014 MICA exhibition, Locally Sourced.