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WYPR Podcast

Healing Amid Corruption

Jul 17, 2018

The effects of The Gun Trace Task Force, a group of now nine police officers accused of robbery, drug, and racketeering are just being assessed. To a get a sense of the fall-out over one of the worst scandals in BPD history which talk to Ivan Potts, who was arrested by GTTF. We also talk to Corey Winfield, a violence mediator from Safe Streets on how he thinks the scandal will impact the streets.

Curious about how the original seed got planted for Out of the Blocks? This week marks the ten-year anniversary of Aaron Henkin & Wendel Patrick’s audio bro-mance, and on this episode the two friends unearth archival audio from when they first crossed paths. They originally met in 2008, when Wendel was Aaron’s musical guest on WYPR’s old radio show, The Signal. Aaron liked Wendel’s music, Wendel liked Aaron’s interviewing style, they hit it off, and the rest is history. Plus: Did you know that ‘Wendel Patrick’ isn’t Wendel Patrick’s real name? Take a trip down memory lane with the guys and enjoy the back-story!

A Valuable Perspective - Gary Blauvelt

Jul 10, 2018

Roland Park Place resident Gary Blauvelt talks about his 41 years of teaching and leadership at Friends School of Baltimore.

Essential Tremors - Tim Kinsella (Joan of Arc)

Jul 10, 2018

Tim Kinsella has made at least two indelible marks on contemporary music—first as frontman of emo hingepoint Cap’n Jazz, then as ringleader of the unpredictable Joan of Arc. In this episode, he talks about formative encounters with Bauhaus, Can, and composer Arnold Dreyblatt.

Scientific American

On December 3, 1926, the great mystery writer, Agatha Christie left for a weekend in Yorkshire. Her car was found abandoned nearby. The police couldn't locate her for ten days. Finally, she was found registered at a hotel under a fake name apparently suffering from severe amnesia. On this episode, Katie explains some of the theories behind her bizarre disappearance. Plus, recommendations for your summer reading, and the Doctor Who episode that best explains Christie's disappearance.

Funny thing about making a podcast:  You never know who’s listening.  Turns out, Baltimore’s mayor, Catherine Pugh, is a fan of Out of the Blocks, and she invited producer Aaron Henkin to join her in front of a live audience for a conversation about the show.  (Aaron got to ask her some questions, too.)  This episode is a recording of the event, which happened Monday evening, June 25th, at the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company’s theater in downtown Baltimore.  

The Mosby Effect, Part 4: The Torturous Path to Reform

Jul 2, 2018

In the final episode of our four part series on the impact of the indictment of six officers in the death of Freddie Gray, we look at the myriad of reforms efforts which happened after Mosby's decision to charge, and the changes which have occurred to the process of policing in Baltimore as a result.

Joy in Medicine - Political Advocacy in Medicine

Jun 22, 2018

Elizabeth and Charlie talk about advocacy, especially around drug pricing.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

In this episode, we meet the founder of the Detroit Artists’ Test Lab, the head of an African American podcast network called Audiowave, neighborhood activists young and old, a closet poet, and the woman who taught The Slide to a generation of skaters at Royal Skateland roller rink.

The Mosby Effect, Part 3: The Disappearing Warrant

Jun 14, 2018

In the third part of our series examining the often-overlooked consequences of State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby’s decision to indict six officers in the death of Freddie Gray, Jan Bledsoe, one the lead prosecutors speaks publicly for the first time.

Essential Tremors - Greg Saunier (Deerhoof)

Jun 12, 2018

Deerhoof has become one of the country’s most unusual and prolific rock bands, and drummer Greg Saunier has been in the driver’s seat the whole time. His ecstatic attack—and his minimal kit—have helped define and distinguish the group, which formed in San Francisco in the mid-1990s.

The Mosby Effect, Part 2: "A Cautionary Case from The Past"

Jun 8, 2018

In the second episode of our four part series examining the far reaching and often overlooked implications of Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby's decision to charge six officers for the death of Freddie Gray, we recount the trial and the aftermath of last major prosecution of a Baltimore police officer for manslaughter.

It was very common in the 1600's for Christians to keep a human skull on their desk to remind them of their own mortality
Katie Marquette/The Walter's Art Museum

Throughout all of human history, human beings have consistently struggled with how to grapple with their own mortality.  The faces we give to Death, in our dreams and our nightmares, can be extremely revealing when trying to understand our deepest fears.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

On the east side of Detroit, the streets of MorningSide are lined with stately, brick Tudor-style houses.  But today, one in four of those houses is abandoned, boarded up, gutted, or burned out.  The foreclosure crisis of 2008 hit MorningSide like a tidal wave, and the neighborhood is struggling to sprout again from the rubble. There’s a lot of buzz about a new Renaissance in downtown Detroit, but the locals in this corner of town are wondering when – and if – the revival is going to make its way to them.  In the meantime, they’re holding their own and looking out for each other.  In this special episode, Out of the Blocks teams up with Michigan Radio’s MorningSide 48224 podcast to share voices from MorningSide.

The Mosby Effect, Episode 1: Shot in the Back

May 31, 2018

In the first episode of our four part series looking at the continuing consequences of the indictment of six officers in the death of Freddie Gray, we go back in time to explore just how difficult it was to prosecute police in the past. To do so, we examine the last major prosecution for a death at the hands of police prior to the Gray case, the shooting of Edward Lamont Hunt.

Ever build one of those snap-together model kits when you were a kid? Think of this episode as a sort of snap-together podcast kit. It includes a demo of a fully mixed and produced Out of the Blocks audio feature, followed by the original interview it was cut from, the accompanying musical score, and lots of bonus interviewing tips.  This episode is a fun tool for anyone who’s interested in learning about podcast production techniques. Listen along, then take apart this episode to build your own version! 

Special thanks to our interviewee, Nate Couser, of The Artist Exchange Radio Show, and check out this story-making toolkit at The Peale Center.

Essential Tremors - Owen Gardner (Horse Lords)

May 15, 2018

Baltimore quartet Horse Lords have become an underground sensation on the back of their trance-inducing polyrhythmic rock attack. In this episode, guitarist Owen Gardner traces his sound back to Africa, to an almost forgotten folk tradition, and to hunting down the avant-garde while growing up in Iowa.

National Aquarium

The National Aquarium in Baltimore’s inner harbor is home to more than 20,000 animals– in air, water and on land. So, what does it take to keep the place afloat?

The Lingering Consequences of Zero Tolerance

May 9, 2018
Patrick Semansky/AP Photo

Morgan State University graduate Evan Howard tells his story of how he was arrested and held in Central Booking for 56 hours without committing a crime during the height of Baltimore's zero tolerance era, and with the repercussions for him that linger years later.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

The owner of a falafel stand gives a lesson in gratitude, a minimalist overcomes cerebral palsy by sheer force of will, a female boss takes the helm at a men’s barbershop, an apparel entrepreneur reflects on a family tragedy with a silver lining, and a friendly neighborhood barista whips up chai lattes and plays experimental doom metal.

Joy in Medicine - MEPRA

May 7, 2018
JH Medicine

Elizabeth and Charles talk about Mindful Ethical Practice and Resilience Academy (MEPRA) with founder/developer Cynda Rushton.

Daniel Goodrich www.danjgoodrich.com

On this episode, producers Adam Droneburg and Calvin Perry take listeners deep underground and back in time. They discover the lost history of the catacombs underneath Lexington Market, a place with a confusing and fascinating history involving crime bosses, communists, and secret raids.

A Valuable Perspective: Margaret Budd

May 3, 2018

Ms. Margaret Budd, Roland Park Resident and a woman that has been on a musical journey most of her life.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

The bartender at The Drinkery tells the history of 'the gayborhood,’ a handyman-turned-comedian reflects on comedy as a flashlight in the dark, a pizza-maker from Pakistan shares words from the Koran about living with good intentions, a master clock-maker ponders the passage of time, and two shop owners share an address and a mutual admiration.

Essential Tremors - Susan Alcorn

Apr 20, 2018

Susan Alcorn spent years playing her pedal-steel guitar in country bands across Texas. But she has also taken the instrument into less typical territory, applying its sinuous tones to jazz, free improvisation, tango, and her personal blend of all of the above. In this episode, she recalls her seminal encounters with 20th-century composition, free jazz, and a steel-player’s steel player.

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela: An Appreciation

Apr 11, 2018
Photo Courtesy Sahisotry.org.za

Today, a reflection on the work and legacy of the late Winnie Madikezela-Mandela, a fierce advocate for social justice who was considered by many South Africans to be the mother of their nation.  

She is widely revered in South Africa and around the African continent for her relentless fight against the South African apartheid system which, for nearly 50 years, subjected the native Black population to violence, intimidation and segregation.

Winnie Madikizela Mandela died last Monday at the age of 81. 

Dr. Emira Woods joins us in Studio A.  Dr. Woods is a  scholar with the Institute for Policy Studies, and a member of the International Working Group for Africans Rising, a network of African social justice movements. 

Joining us from Boston is Dr. Xolela Mangcu.  He’s a Professor of Sociology at the University of Cape Town, and  the author and co-author of nine books, including a biography of the late anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

The 200 block of W Read Street was Baltimore’s ground zero for hippies, head shops, gay nightlife, and wild fashion.  In this episode, we explore the past and present of the neighborhood with a vintage clothier, a husband-and-husband duo that runs a hair salon, a father and son who operate a 70-year-old key shop, and a guy who loves to smoke a good cigar.

hummusforthought.com

The classic Noir films of the 1940s and 50s – black and white mysteries noted for their moral ambiguity, tough-talking detectives, and classic femme fatales – seem to epitomize Old Hollywood glamour. Yet, these films were often operating on very low budgets, relying on the allure of Noir tropes to retain an audience. We’ll talk with film expert Marc Sober about some of the classics of the genre.

Dogs in the ICU at Johns Hopkins

Apr 4, 2018
JH Medicine

Elizabeth and Charlie talk about dogs and their healing value in the ICU at Johns Hopkins.

Chinatown ID, Seattle, part 2

Mar 26, 2018
all photos by Wendel Patrick

Devotion to family.  That’s the overarching theme in this episode, as we return to Seattle’s Chinatown International District once more to visit with sons and daughters who are committed to honoring and preserving their families’ legacies. 

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