WYPR Programs | WYPR

WYPR Programs

Maryland Book Bank

Kids from low-income families tend to grow up in homes with fewer books than their middle-class peers. And that difference can undermine how well they read, and what they can achieve in school. The non-profit Maryland Book Bank aims to remedy this imbalance by collecting and distributing free books. Founder Mark Fiering fills us in on efforts to put books in the hands of eager readers. 

photos courtesy DeRay Mckesson; Ezra Levin

In the weeks since President-elect Donald Trump’s electoral college victory, supporters of his Democratic rival for the White House, Hillary Clinton, have been wondering how they can leverage her historic, nearly 3-million vote plurality in the popular vote to resist the Trump Administration and the far-right agenda they believe Mr. Trump and a Republican-controlled Congress will pursue.  For many liberals and progressives in America, the election outcome is sparking new interest in grass-roots organizing and political activism. Today we’re going to explore the emerging anti-Trump movement with two activists who know a thing or two about harnessing citizen power: DeRay Mckesson, a Baltimore public school official who’s been one of the leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement, and Ezra Levin, co-author of a new online ”field guide” for anti-Trump activism called Indivisible.  They also take your calls, emails and tweets during the segment.

Photo by Tom Lauer

Midday’s theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck returns for her weekly review of a local stage production. This week, she discusses the Vagabond Players’ new rendition of The Complete History of America (abridged), written by Adam Long, Reed Martin, and Austin Tichenor and directed by Howard Berkowitz. Starring Fred Fletcher-Jackson, Sean Kelly, and William B. Meister, The Complete History condenses 600 years of American history into 90 minutes of outrageous satire.

The Complete History of America (abridged) runs through February 5th at Vagabond Theatre in Fell’s Point. 

Thousands of Baltimore City residents have outstanding warrants for failing to appear for court dates on misdemeanor charges. A partnership between Baltimore City and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law is offering people a second chance to appear in court. We speak to Doug Colbert, professor of Law at the University of Maryland and director of the law school’s Access to Justice clinic, about who is eligible for a second chance, and how to proceed.

Chesapeake Bay Program / Flickr via Creative Commons

The 2017 General Assembly convenes on this day, facing many environmental issues -- from fracking to pollution trading, tax credits for electric cars to cleaning up the Bay. Tim Wheeler, managing editor and project writer for the Bay Journal, joins us with a preview of the session’s anticipated environmental agenda.

Flickr-Creative Commons

The 2017 Maryland General Assembly opens for business on Wednesday.  During their annual 90-day legislative session, more than 180 lawmakers from across the state, in the Senate and the House of Delegates, will be drilling down into hundreds of pieces of legislation on issues affecting Marylanders in all walks of life – from business, schools and the environment, to transportation and criminal justice.  They’ll be wrestling with complex tax and budget challenges.  And the 2017 session promises what most recent General Assemblies have provided: pitched partisan battles between the Democratically – controlled legislature and Maryland’s Republican governor, Larry Hogan.  Today on Midday, two intrepid State House reporters join Tom for a closer look at some of the key legislative issues before the General Assembly, and predict where Maryland lawmakers and the Governor are likely to clash, and where they might also find agreement.

Erin Cox is The Baltimore Sun's State House bureau chief.   Rachel Baye covers the legislature for us here at WYPR.  They'll be with us for the full hour, and we'll also take your calls, emails and tweets.

Steven Depolo/Flickr via Creative Commons

Today we’re talking about cancer, and a surprising rise in oral cancer. A recent analysis found that insurance claims for oral cancer have skyrocketed over the last five years, particularly among men. What explains this rise, why do men appear to be more vulnerable than women, and what can be done to prevent cancer of the mouth, tongue, tonsils, and throat? Dr. Gypsyamber D'Souza, an associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, joins us in studio.

Joe Mixon and the Tape

Jan 9, 2017
Ervins Strauhmanis/flickr

In the coming NFL offseason, talent evaluators from all 32 teams, including the Ravens, will spend hundreds of hours watching game tapes. They’ll try to find the potential draftee who can make their team better in the short and long term.

Yet the most impactful tape of a prospective NFL player will have footage that has nothing to do with football action.

Joe Mixon is passing up his senior season at the University of Oklahoma to be a professional and there are reports that he’s one of the best running backs coming out of college. But all those reports, his workouts and his highlight tapes and their potential bearing on Mixon’s chance to make a roster pale in comparison to the footage of him punching a woman in the face in July 2014.

Templeton Press

Unemployment is at its lowest in nearly 10 years. However,  almost one in eight men is out of the labor force entirely, neither working nor even looking for work. So who are these men and what’s keeping them out of the job market?

Today, a conversation with Nicholas Eberstadt and Anirban Basu about the historically high number of men in their prime working years who are not in the workforce.

Nicholas Eberstadt holds the Henry Wendt Chair in Political Economy at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). His latest book is Men Without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis.

Anirbahn Basu is the Chairman and CEO of the Sage Policy Group, an economic consulting firm and host of the Morning Economic Report on WYPR. 

Oscar Ucho/flickr

Maybe you had a terrific 2016 or maybe you didn’t. Companies can also have good or bad years. According to CNN Money, here are some of the companies that had a terrible year and hope to bounce-back in 2017.

Pages