WYPR Programs

  Michael Helfrich stands near a wall of weather-beaten concrete 10 stories tall and nearly a mile long that holds back the force of the Susquehanna River – the largest source of fresh water in the Chesapeake Bay.

Helfrich, the Lower Susquehanna Riverkeeper, explains that the Conowingo hydroelectric dam, built in 1929, has been both a curse and a blessing to the nation’s largest estuary.  It blocks the passage of migratory fish upstream. But until recently, it has also been blocking about half of the soil, fertilizer and other heavy pollutants washed by rain from Pennsylvania farms and towns down into the Bay.

"The dam has accumulated about 185 million tons of sediment and pollution that otherwise would have entered the bay," Helfrich said.

Suddenly, as he spoke, a siren sounded beside the dam.  "Luckily, we’re not down by the river, because there’s the alarm saying that they are going to open some more turbines and the water is going to come up," he said, as a frothing surge of water boiled and grew near the base of the dam.  “That siren is the warning."

Alarms have been going off all over Maryland because of the Conowingo Dam.  Some have called it a pollution "time bomb" that could rattle bay cleanup plans because the Conowingo Reservoir, behind the dam, is now just about full with sediment. The dam's days as a pollution filter are done. And so now major storms scour millions of tons of sediment – loaded with phosphorus fertilizer, as well as more exotic chemicals-- and flush them over the dam down into the bay.


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From a retelling of Shakespeare’s "The Taming of the Shrew" set in present-day Baltimore to a world where humans live among dragons, we’ve got summer reading picks perfect for lazy days at the beach or long flights out of town. Looking to dive into American history while lounging by the pool? Try a humorous account of swashbuckling Revolutionary War hero Marquis de Lafayette. Want to escape to 1940's New York? How about a thriller complete with German saboteurs and the Mafia. We’ve got mysteries, memoirs, and more. 

Dave Wetty, Cloud Prime Photography

Dr. Carol Anderson, author of White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide, joins Tom in-studio to discuss the reasons behind the racial divide in America. While some argue that the Uprising in Baltimore was a result black anger bubbling over after years of systemic and institutionalized racism, Anderson argues that the chasm between whites and people of color has been animated, throughout American history, by white reaction and opposition to any and all progress towards equality made by minorities.  To support her argument, Anderson points to the white southern reaction to reconstruction efforts following the Civil War, Supreme Court decisions in the 1970s that undermined Brown v. Board of Education, the war on drugs and ongoing voter suppression efforts. 

Then, Nutrition Diva, Monica Reinagel, and Evan Lutz, founder of Hungry Harvest join Tom to discuss efforts to end food waste. Hungry Harvest "recovers" discarded produce from local farms, food wholesalers, and packing houses and boxes and delivers it to paying subscribers. For every box purchased, the program also delivers fresh produce to a family in need. 

Dave Wetty, Cloud Prime Photography

Dr. Carol Anderson is the chair of the African-American Studies Department at Emory University, and the author of White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide

According to Anderson, racial discord and inequality in America is the product of white reaction and opposition to any progress made by people of color.  To support her argument, Anderson points to the white southern reaction to reconstruction efforts following the Civil War, Supreme Court decisions in the 1970s that undermined Brown v. Board of Education, the war on drugs and ongoing voter suppression efforts. 

Dr. Anderson joins Tom in-studio to discuss White Rage and how racial animus towards black and brown people in America perpetuates inequality. 

Monica Reinagel; Hungry Harvest

An estimated six billion pounds of produce are thrown away every year in the United States. That's enough to fill up four NFL stadiums. Half of that massive volume of fruits and vegetables doesn't even make it to grocery store shelves because commercial sorters and packers consider imperfectly shaped or slightly blemished produce to be too "ugly" to sell.

To combat this monumental food waste and redirect perfectly edible produce to markets -- and consumers -- that need it, recent University of Maryland graduate Evan Lutz established Hungry Harvest. The non-profit "recovers" this discarded produce from local farms, food wholesalers, and packing houses and boxes and delivers it to paying subscribers. For every box purchased, the program also delivers fresh produce to a family in need.

In this month's Smart Nutrition segment, Lutz and our regular Nutrition Diva Monica Reinagel join Tom in-studio to discuss Hungry Harvest's market-based strategies to end waste and improve equity in the nation's food system.

There are many recent college graduates running around.  Undoubtedly, some are still wondering what they should do and where they should go.  In partnership with LinkedIn, Trulia compiled its new Graduate Opportunity Index.  The index ranks forty of America’s strongest jobs markets based on what they have to offer recent college graduates. 

June 21, 2016 - Radio Kitchen - Mulberries with Gwen Kokes

We are in prime time for berries here in Maryland. Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, are all here or in the pipeline.  But there is one other berry that does well in Maryland that I have absolutely no cooking experience with, and that is the mulberry.  So we invited Gwen Kokes to school us on this big juicy berry.

Jay A. Perman - 6/21/16

Jun 21, 2016

 

Jay A. Perman, MD, became the sixth president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) in July 2010.

A pediatric gastroenterologist, Perman continues to practice medicine through his weekly President’s Clinic, where he teaches team-based health care to students of medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, law, and social work.

Andrew Dyer / Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland’s woods, fields and urban spaces are full of food, if you know how to find it. Cattails, milkweed, wild ginger, mulberries. Did you know stinging nettles were edible? What about pine needles? More and more people are learning to utilize Maryland’s outdoor pantry. Like canning, knitting, and other skills we’d begun to forget, the ancient art of foraging has become trendy. Upscale restaurants now serve ingredients gathered from wild places, and foraging workshops are increasingly popular. What’s the appeal? Which are the greatest delicacies and how do you find them? And what’s the etiquette of filling your plate from the forest? We speak to Nick Spero, a biologist and longtime forager who teaches courses on wild edibles for the Natural History Society of Maryland, and Eric Kelly, the founder of Charm City Farms, an urban agriculture initiative that teaches self-sufficiency skills, including foraging. Kelly also founded a group called 'Foragers of Baltimore'.  

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Greg and Hector discuss young adults, health care, and reality, and how millennials are handling their health care decisions.

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