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Johns Hopkins professor of psychiatry and mood disorders Kay Redfield Jamison, acclaimed author of An Unquiet Mind, trains her expertise on one of the most acclaimed poets of the 20th century in her new book Robert Lowell: Setting the River on Fire. We discuss how Lowell’s manic-depressive disease influenced his writing, the importance of his strength of character, and how common mania is among the creative.

Maryland GovPics

Nearly 2,700 bills were introduced in this year’s session of the Maryland General Assembly, which came to a close on Monday night. Paid sick leave is in. Fracking is out. Ethics laws for lawmakers were juiced-up, as a long time member is indicted on fraud charges. There was a package of bills to address the opioid epidemic, and a measure that could lead to punishment for drug manufacturers who hike prices unreasonably. Gov. Larry Hogan reached a compromise on a transportation bill, and legislators found a way to allocate additional help to local school jurisdictions, including Baltimore. When asked to assess the third General Assembly since being elected in 2014, the Governor told reporters,“I’m not sure how it could have been any better."

Last night the Maryland General Assembly wrapped up its 437th annual session, passing hundreds of bills in the final hours of Sine Die, as the last day is known. Governor Larry Hogan was generally pleased with the session, but promised to veto a paid sick leave bill. Governor Hogan proposed a bill that would have required businesses that employ 50 or more workers in a single location to provide sick leave. Democrats rejected that bill, in favor of a bill that requires businesses with 15 or more full-time employees to provide employees the opportunity to earn at least 5 sick days a year.  

Tom speaks with House Minority Leader Nic Kipke who represents Anne Arundel County in the Maryland House of Delegates. 

Summoning the Snooze

Apr 11, 2017
Jacob Stewart/Flickr via Creative Commons

When you cannot sleep, the middle of the night can be a harrowing spot. Insomnia is all too familiar for many of us. Dr. Emerson Wickwire, director of the insomnia program at the University of Maryland Medical Center, joins us to talk about the causes of this maddening affliction and how best to summon the snooze. Original air date: November 30, 2016.

AP Photo

The Consent Decree between the city of Baltimore, the Baltimore Police Department and the Department of Justice was the result of a damning report in August 2016 that described a pattern or practice of unconstitutional misconduct by Baltimore police, which has disproportionately affected the city's communities of color.   

When Judge James Bredar signed the Consent Decree this past Friday (April 7), it became an order of the court.

So now, what’s next?  What will court oversight of the police department look like?  How will the Trump Justice Department be involved with an agreement reached during the waning days of the Obama administration?  And if the police department is committed to reform on its own, why is a consent decree necessary?

Joining Tom to address these questions are four people who've been closely following the evolution of Baltimore's Consent Decree over the past two years:

Monique Dixon is Deputy Director of Policy for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund;

David Rocah is the Senior Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Maryland;

Bishop Douglas Miles is Pastor of the Koinonia Baptist Church and Co-Chair Emeritus of BUILD, Baltimorians United In Leadership Development;

and Kevin Rector covers the courts and crime for the Baltimore Sun. 

Sine Die 2017

Apr 10, 2017
Rachel Baye / WYPR

It’s Sine Die – or, translating loosely, “no tomorrow.” Whatever proposals Maryland’s legislators don’t act on by midnight will be let undone. We reflect on what passed, what died, and what elected officials are expected to take up again next year. Our analysts: WYPR Statehouse reporter Rachel Baye and political commentator Barry Rascovar.

Sodanie Chea/flickr

On the menu this week: Baked ham, chocolate bunnies, lamb and the fixings we've come to expect on Easter and spring tables. Plus Chef Wolf and Tony Foreman share some picks for wine and desserts.

Photo montage courtesy Daily Express

It's the Midday News Wrap, our Friday focus on the week's top local, national and international news stories, which certainly came in a cascade this week.  Our special guest and our panel of news analysts help us sort them all out:

After promising an “America First” foreign policy, President Trump last night ordered a cruise missile attack on a Syrian airbase, in response to President Bashir Al-Assad’s latest use of chemical weapons.

Steve Bannon is out as a member of the NSC's inner circle.  Devin Nunes is out, at least temporarily, as the Republican's lead investigator on the House Intelligence Committee looking into Russian meddling in the US election.  

Also out: a 60-vote requirement for Supreme Court nominees.

In the U.S. for meetings with Mr. Trump were the leaders of Egypt, Jordan and China.  And the President’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, is in, it seems, on just about everything.   

Tom begins the show today with Senator Chris Van Hollen, who won the seat vacated by Barbara Mikulski last year.  Then, Tom is joined by Domenico Montanaro, lead editor for politics at NPR and Luke Broadwater, reporter for the Baltimore Sun.

Time now for another Stoop story. This week we hear a story from Mark Lowry about growing up in Baltimore’s Charles Village. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Rachel Baye / WYPR

Days before the General Assembly session ends, legislators are involved in heated arguments about whether state law should limit local police cooperation with federal immigration enforcement. Reporter Josh Hicks of the Washington Post fills us in.

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