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WYPR Programs

Lisa Nickerson/Kennedy Krieger Institute

When an adult has a stroke, signs and symptoms are often recognizable. But what if the victim is a toddler? Or an infant … someone who may not be able to sense or communicate that something is amiss? Pediatric stroke is more common than you think. We hear from Dr. Frank Pidcock, medical director of Kennedy Krieger Institute's ‘Constraint Induced Movement Therapy’ program. Then we visit Brooklynn, who suffered a stroke at the age of one and a half, and her mother, Nikki Wolcott at a therapy session.

Ivy Bookshop

In his new history: "Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom," Russell Shorto Russell Shorto traces the disparate lives of six people in the 18th century, from slave to general to aristocrat … and what freedom and the American Revolution meant to each of them. We meet a black man enslaved in Africa who engineers his freedom in America and an Indian warrior steering between his instincts and the will of his people. There’s an English aristocrat, an American-born daughter of a British officer , a shoemaker who becomes a local politician, and a Virginia planter named Washington. Shorto writes that we are still fighting the Revolution.

Centers for Disease Control

To date, more than 60 women have accused Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct. The accusations range from indecent exposure to rape. A new piece in the New Yorker written by Ronan Farrow alleges that Weinstein hired private investigators to collect information on his accusers and the journalists who tried to expose him in an effort to suppress stories about his predatory behavior.  

In the days after the New York Times published the initial story on Weinstein detailing a few of the allegations, more people came forward with sexual assault allegations against other powerful men in Hollywood including producer James Toback and actor Kevin Spacey. At least 60 women have accused Bill Cosby of sexual assault; a majority of those accusations came to light in 2014 and 2015. The trial in one of those cases ended in a mistrial earlier this year. 

photos by Wendel Patrick

This is quite possibly the first time ever that a musical score for a podcast was written for, and performed by, a full symphony orchestra.   Here’s how it happened:  Out of the Blocks collaborated with the BSO for a special concert series called, “Baltimore Voices.” The concerts featured recordings of four Baltimore City teenagers sharing beautiful and honest stories about their lives.  Wendel Patrick composed an original score for each story.  And The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performed Wendel’s scores live, while the stories aired on the sound system in the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.

photo by Kenneth K. Lam - Baltimore Sun

We begin with a look at the Baltimore Police Department's trial board hearing that's considering, in the first of three administrative proceedings, whether disciplinary action should be taken against Officer Cesar Goodson, Jr., one of six officers indicted in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray in 2015.  He drove the van that transported Mr. Gray.  Goodson was acquitted of the charges, including one for second-degree "depraved heart" murder, brought against him by State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby.  But last week and again today (Monday), he sat before a three-member panel engaged by the Police Department to determine whether or not his actions merit disciplinary action.

Of the six police officers originally charged in the Freddie Gray case, just three face trial board hearings: Goodson,  Lt. Brian Rice (tried and acquitted) and Sgt. Alicia White (charges dropped).  Trial boards for Rice and White are expected to begin, respectively, later this month and  sometime in December.  Officers Garrett Miller (charges dropped) and Edward Nero (tried and acquitted) chose to receive one-week suspensions rather than face the trial boards.  A sixth officer involved in the Freddie Gray case, William Porter (charges dropped), faces no discipline.

David Jaros is on the faculty of the University of Baltimore Law School.  Debbie Hines is an attorney in private practice in Washington.  They both paid very close attention to Officer Goodson’s criminal trial last year.  They join Tom in the studio to talk about what the trial board hearings say about the ability of the Baltimore Police department to police itself, and whether these disciplinary proceedings can restore community trust in the force.

Last week, CSX Transportation shocked the Hogan administration and local officials by withdrawing its support for an expansion of the Howard Street Tunnel. What does that decision mean for the city and for the Port of Baltimore? And, what does it mean for the current tunnel, which was built in the 1890s? It was the site of a large chemical fire after a 60 train-car pile-up, which did severe damage to underground infrastructure, 16 years ago.    

 Colin Campbell is a reporter for the Baltimore Sun who wrote about CSX's decision to tank the tunnel plans.  David Warnock is the co-founder of Camden Partners, a venture capital firm, and a former candidate for Mayor. They join Tom to talk about the Howard Street tunnel. 

Kamau High, managing editor of The Afro-American newspaper, joins Tom to talk about the local stories his newsroom is covering. There have been some changes in the leadership of the local chapter of the NAACP, and a racially-charged controversy erupted last week, when some students at local private schools dressed up as Freddie Gray for Halloween. 

Bruno Fazenda / Flickr via Creative Commons

More than 4,600 children in Maryland live in out-of-home placements such as foster care, and studies show that LGBT youth tend to be overrepresented in the foster system.

Judith Schagrin is the assistant director for children’s services for Baltimore County. She gives us an overview of the training potential foster parents undergo. And we hear from former foster youth who identify as LGBT.

Did their sexual orientation affect their experiences? Did they feel prepared when they left foster care? How does Baltimore County ensure foster parents stand by ALL children?

Over nearly five decades, BrickHouse Books has nurtured scores of authors whose voices might otherwise not have heard. It’s arguably the oldest continually operating small book publisher in Maryland. Since 1973 (circa photo), poet and author Clarinda Harriss has been BrickHouse’s editor and driving force … creating subdivisions to publish poetry and LGBT manuscripts. Proceeds from sales get reinvested in the next book. What keeps Harriss at it?

Here’s a stoop story from Joe Sugarman about becoming a father for the second time … and how he and his wife followed their birth plan a little too by-the-book. You can hear his story and others at StoopStorytelling.com

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