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WYPR Programs

The​ decade-long ​legal​ ​struggle​ ​between​ ​Maryland​ ​and​ advocates for ​its historically​ black​ ​​universities​ ​and​ ​​colleges​ ​is​ ​back​ ​in​ ​federal​ ​court. The​ ​HBCU coalition alleges​ ​Maryland​ ​has​ ​underfunded​ ​its​ ​historically​ ​black​ ​institutions and​ ​allowed​ ​other​ ​state​ ​schools​ ​to​ ​duplicate​ ​their​ ​programs, draining​ ​students​ ​away​ ​and keeping HBCUs from achieving racial diversity. “Frankly what happens is that white students will not go to the HBCU. They’ll go to the traditionally white institution if both schools offer the same programs," says our guest, Jon Greenbaum of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. He is one of the lawyers representing the coalition. We hear a different view from commentator Laslo Boyd, former acting state secretary of higher education.

Beck/flickr

Tony and Chef Cindy take you through everything you need to know about getting the right product, using the right process and choosing the right wine. Stay tuned till the end of the program for a Chef's Challenge.

Dyer's Deceit

Jan 6, 2017
broadcastpioneers.com

Gil on the (Minor League) Orioles' play-by-play announcer Bill Dyer and his so-called "lucky chair."

Today, members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences started voting on nominations for this year’s Academy Awards. Ann Hornaday of the Washington Post  and Jed Dietz of the Maryland Film Festival weigh-in on some of the late Oscar contenders.  Fences is a hit.  Silence is making a lot of noise, and Moonlight, which has already won several pre-Oscar awards, is re-opening in Baltimore at the Charles Theatre.

Auckland Photo News/flickr

You may have heard the song “The Twelve Days of Christmas” a lot over the past few weeks. While it’s unlikely that you would actually purchase a Partridge in a Pear Tree or Two Turtle Doves or Six Geese a-Laying, etc., you could conceivably. Each year, the PNC Index calculates the cost of purchasing the 12 sets of items listed in that song, including those 11 pipers piping and 12 drummers drumming.

Time for the next installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. Mario Rolando Diaz recounts his escape from El Salvador during the country’s Civil War. His story has been edited for brevity. The full version is available here.

You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Instagram: @ShareaBabyMD / ShareBaby Baby Pantry

Babies go through dozens of diapers each week - an expensive but necessary purchase to keep infants healthy. But when families can’t make ends meet, they may resort to stretching out their supply. Social worker Eliseba Osore saw first hand the need for free diapers. Osore tells us how, as an Open Society Institute Community Fellow, she plans to expand her diaper bank into a free baby pantry - with clothing, furniture, and other supplies.

Charleston's TheDigitel/flickr

Many people approaching retirement or already retired are scrambling for income. With interest rates still often hovering around the rate of inflation, many older Americans are trapped between safer investments that yield little income and riskier investments that could generate higher returns but which could also ultimately undermine their savings.

The Price of a Penny

Jan 5, 2017
Alejandro Mallea/flickr

When you find all those pennies in your pockets or in the crevices of your couch, your probably feel pretty annoyed. Pennies are not very valuable and in sufficient numbers are heavy and bulky. But the next time you find a penny, you might want to consider how expensive it was to manufacture.

Mithun

Today, a conversation about State Center, the sprawling office complex in West Baltimore that stretches from Howard St. and Martin Luther King Blvd. in West Baltimore, across both sides of Eutaw St, and all the way north and west to Dolphin St. and Madison Ave.  State Center houses various state agencies. It was built more than 50 years ago, and people who work in and manage the buildings agree that they are in serious disrepair. They’ve agreed about that for a long time. Ten years ago, developers were asked by the administration of Gov. Bob Ehrlich to suggest a plan to upgrade and revitalize the state offices in a way that would also revitalize the surrounding West Baltimore neighborhoods. Gov. Ehrlich got the ball rolling and his successor, Gov. Martin O’Malley, kept it spinning, but it’s been rolling very slowly, and it has encountered more than a few bumps.  Twenty-six million dollars later -- after many public hearings and multiple approvals at various stages by various state agencies, the project is shovel-ready. The Hogan Administration, however, is apparently not ready. Why not?

Tom is joined in the studio today by Caroline Moore. She is CEO and founding partner of Ekistics LLC, the developer that has been working on the State Center project since 2006. John Kyle is here as well. He’s the President of the State Center Neighborhood Alliance, which represents the nine neighborhoods surrounding State Center and nearby institutions,  such as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the University of Maryland Medical Center. We’re also joined by Natalie Sherman, a reporter who covers real estate and economic development for the Baltimore Sun.  And Tom spoke earlier by phone with Doug Mayer, the Governor’s communications director, so you’ll also hear what the State has to say about the status of the project and the State’s apparent change of heart about proceeding with the plans.

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