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NIH Clinical Center / Flickr via Creative Commons

As more people in America speak languages other than English, a program at Howard Community College prepares interpreters for the medical field. Instructor Lisette Albano and interpreter Hyon Lee describe how interpreters improve patient care while acting as a neutral party.

Jim Lukach/flickr

From the humble chickpea to lavish saffron rice. Tony and Chef Cindy talk about their favorite types of beans and peas and some delicious preparations for grains and rice. 

If you are interested in exploring some heritage varieties to cook at home, you can check out Anson Mills for some great ideas.

Courtesy of the Brookings Institute

When the sweeping Republican tax bill was pushed through and voted into law just before Christmas, critics ripped into it as a gift for the wealthy. Many of them focused on the benefits that it will bestow upon the wealthiest of all -- the top 1% — and especially the top 0.1%. Critics worry that the ultra rich are becoming wealthier, while incomes for most other Americans are stagnant.

Today's guest, Richard Reeves, says that the gap that poses the greatest threat to our culture isn’t the one between the insanely rich and the rest of us, but rather, it’s the gap between most people and the so-called Upper Middle Class, the top 20% of Americans, by wealth. That gap, Reeves says, is changing how families are structured and it’s informing our political and personal attitudes about everything. 

Richard Reeves joins Tom live from the studios of NPR in Washington, DC.

msa.maryland.gov

We talk with Baltimore Sun Opinion editor Andy Green and Barry Rascovar, columnist for Political Maryland, to discuss  the wide range of problems and aspirations Maryland lawmakers are bringing to the legislative session that starts Wednesday. Both agree that the election year will shape every issue into a contest for political advantage between the Democratic majority and the Republican governor ... from working to subdue the dire homicides in Baltimore and the escalating overdose deaths statewide, to jumping  hurdles thrown down by the Trump administration, like the new federal tax law that could shake up Maryland’s revenues and undermine health insurance. 

Here’s a Stoop Story from musician Wendel Patrick, co-producer of WYPR's Out of the Blocks, speaking about a photograph that inspired him. You can hear his story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Svklimkin / Flickr via Creative Commons

If you have family photos collecting dust in shoeboxes or digital files encroaching on your computer’s desktop--it may be time for action! Light and water can deteriorate prints, and files can be lost as technology changes. Elizabeth England and Jim Stimpert, archivists with the Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries' Special Collections, offer advice on photo preservation. They will be speaking on January 13th at an event at Hopkins' Homewood Museum.

Danni Williams via Facebook

On this week's edition of the Midday News Wrap: The Labor Department announced that the economy added 148,000 jobs last month, fewer than expected. The stock market is at record levels. The unemployment rate remained steady at 4.1%. Very few other things appeared steady this week. Steve Bannon’s list of BFFs is considerably smaller this week. President Trump says Bannon has lost his mind. People at Breitbart News think Bannon may soon lose his job. The President tweeted about the size of his nuclear button. A new bombshell book by a journalistic flame thrower suggests that many in Trump’s circle question the President’s basic competence for his job, confirming the impression held by about 70 million voters in 2016. And President Trump dissolved the Voter Fraud Commission.

The New York Times reported last night that Special Counsel Robert Mueller appears to be investigating false statements made by the President and inquiries made by the Attorney General as a matter of possible obstruction of justice. And two new Democratic senators were sworn in this week: Doug Jones, the first Democrat to represent Alabama in 25 years, and Tina Smith, who replaces Al Franken as the junior Senator from Minnesota. The Senate now includes a record high 22 women in its ranks, and the Republican majority has been shaved to one.

In Baltimore, sub-zero temperatures have exposed sub-par performance by city and state officials, as classrooms in nearly one third of schools in Baltimore had heating problems. And the FBI made the stunning decision to refuse to accommodate Police Commissioner Kevin Davis’ request that it take over the investigation into the death of Detective Sean Suiter.

Joining Tom in Studio A to discuss this week's news: Julie Bykowicz covers national politics for the Wall Street Journal. Before joining the Journal, she covered the Trump White House for the Associated Press. Michael Fletcher is a senior writer at The Undefeated, the on-line platform of ESPN. He was for many years a national reporter for The Washington Post, where he covered economics and the White House. 

Rachael Boer Photography

Baltimore-based classical guitarists Jorge Amaral and Mia Pomerantz-Amaral joined Tom in studio to give us a fabulous preview of their concert this weekend.

Duo Amaral will be performing a program of Latin American music this Sunday, Jan. 7, at 3 p.m.,  in Columbia, Maryland, as part of the Sundays at Three Chamber Music Series. Click here for more information and tickets.

Photo by Jack English

On this month's edition of Midday at the Movies, Tom is joined by our regular movie maven Jed Dietz, the founding director of the Maryland Film Festival, and by special guest Max Weiss, the managing editor and film critic at Baltimore Magazine, who also writes about culture at Vulture.com, the entertainment website of New York Magazine.

Awards season is underway, and our guests weigh in on some of the films in contention for the year's first major awards presentation: the 75th annual Golden Globes, which happen this Sunday (January 7th at 8PM ET on NBC).  They'll talk about a few interesting omissions from the roster of nominees…and a couple of new biopics: one about Britain's World War II-era prime minister Winston Churchill, called Darkest Hourand a second, which opens tomorrow night, about another legendary figure, of a different sort: 1994 Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding, whose gritty backstory is the focus of I, Tonya.

And we field your calls, emails and tweets about the movies on your mind...

Centers for Disease Control

We’ve heard it over and over: get your flu shot. If you’re older than six months, get your shot. The flu can be more than uncomfortable -- it can be fatal. What goes into the shot that inoculates against the virus? And why do we need a new one each year? Dr. Kathleen Neuzil, Professor and Director at the Center for Vaccine Development of the University of Maryland Medical School, tells us why the influenza virus is a master of mutation, modifying its proteins as it replicates from season to season. To find information on how to protect yourself against influenza, visit this site. For information on where to find flu shots in Baltimore County, go here and in Baltimore City, go here.

Today, we continue our series of conversations with members of the Baltimore City Council who came into office in late 2016 as part of a wave of energetic and idealistic legislators who were elected on the promise of change and new ideas.

One thing that hasn’t changed: Baltimore’s insistent and insidious plague of violence.  In 2017, record numbers of Baltimoreans, lost their lives to homicide. Today we’ll focus on Baltimore City and the issues before the city council as this New Year gets underway. 

thebaltimorebeat.com

The Baltimore Beat  editors return for a regular pulse check. Deputy editor Maura Callahan tells us why arts coverage deserves the same care and attention as news coverage, and The Beat’s editor-in-chief, Lisa Snowden-McCray, talks about the cover story: New Year’s resolutions for Baltimore City--not from people in power, but from artists, professors, activists and The Beat’s own team. Priorities surface about police, public transit and arts funding.

pixabay.com

A warning to listeners who may be tuning in with young children: we will be talking about mature topics today on this edition of Midday Culture Connections.

The sexual assault allegations against powerful men in Hollywood and pretty much every other industry has shined a light on the pervasiveness of predatory sexual behavior. Today, we’ll examine the ways hypersexualized images of women on television, on the internet and in print distort the ways our culture views and treats women. Scholars have called it “pornification.”  

 Pornography dominates the internet. More people view internet porn every month than click on Netflix, Amazon and Twitter combined. So how does pornography affect mainstream popular culture? And how do the images of women we encounter every day affect the ways women view themselves and the ways men view and interact with women?

Creative problem solving is a valuable skill to have in work and in life. Open Society Institute fellow Jackie Bello is dedicated to that concept. She talks about her program, “Bet on Baltimore,” where she teaches young people to think like designers to solve problems.

(This conversation originally aired on November 15, 2017.)

A student is suspended from the University of Tulsa for statements his husband made on Facebook; posters advertising “Straight Pride Week” ordered removed from bulletin boards at Youngstown State University. A law professor is asked to resign when she wears blackface to a Halloween party, to promote a conversation about race. Today on Midday, a conversation about free speech on college campuses. Are trigger warnings and safe spaces in higher education stifling intellectual thought and violating the first amendment or creating intellectually diverse and inclusive campuses? 

Scout out talented students at HBCUs, prepare them for the rigors of law school, mentor them throughout their careers. The Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence aims to boost diversity in the legal profession. We hear from the co-founders, University of Baltimore law professors Michael Higginbotham and Michael Meyerson, and we meet two graduates at the start of their law careers, Annice Brown and Keon Eubanks.

Photo by Robert Kniesche/Baltimore Sun

(This program was originally aired live on October 10, 2017)

In this archive edition of MiddayWYPR and the Baltimore Museum of Industry team up for a special program -- presented as part of BMI's Issues in Industry series -- examining Baltimore's calamitous de-industrialization, the challenge of rebuilding the city's workforce, and the future of work in Baltimore's increasingly dynamic industrial landscape.  Broadcast in front of a live audience at BMI's Communications Gallery, the hour-long discussion featured Midday host Tom Hall moderating a guest panel that included Anita Kassof, BMI’s executive director; Dr. Nicole King, associate professor and chair of the Department of American Studies at UMBC;  Phillip J. Pack, a retired Sparrows Point steelworker and union trainer; Lauren Purviance, with Jane Addams Resource Corp., a Baltimore job training firm; Dr. Julianne Malveaux, a labor economist, author, media commentator and CEO of Economic Education, LLC; and Joe Jones, Director, Center for Urban Families, a Baltimore nonprofit.

The panel also addressed emailed and tweeted questions and comments from the live audience.

Chris Wilson, social justice advocate and entrepreneur, shares a Stoop Story about how his traumatic childhood and a life sentence led him to turn his life around and ultimately, help others.

Melissa Gerr / WYPR radio/Baltimore

Beyond the cacophony of bass drums, cymbals and snares, we hear about why participation in The Christian Warriors, a marching band in West Baltimore, means so much more than making music together. We meet the band’s assistant director, James Parker, who played in the drumline as a young teen. Founder and director Reverend Ernest King tells us about the legacy of dedication and community support that has held it all together. Watch a video of their rehearsal here. Original air date: Sept 15, 2017.

Copyright Epic Photography Jamie Schoenberger

(This program originally aired on October 24, 2017.)

Tom’s guest today is Alice McDermott, the New York Times best-selling author of eight novels. Three of them, After This, At Weddings and Wakes and That Night, were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. Another novel, Charming Billy, won the National Book Award in 1998.

Her eighth novel, The Ninth Hour, published last September, is a profound and moving contemplation on the big issues: love, family, faith, religion and bringing meaning to one’s life. The story is told with tenderness and compassion, by an artist at the height of her creative and literary powers.

Time Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The New York Times, NPR and others have named The Ninth Hour one of the best novels of 2017.  Listen to this archive edition of Midday,  and you'll understand why.

Photo courtesy Goucher College.

(This program originally aired live on October 17, 2017)

Elizabeth Strout is Tom's guest in this archive edition of Midday.  Strout is the author of six novels and many short stories; her most recent book is a series of linked tales called Anything is Possible.  Linking stories together was a structural device that Ms. Strout also employed in what is perhaps her most well-known work, Olive Kitteridge.  The book earned her the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction , and Frances McDormand starred in an adaptation of the story for HBO that won eight Emmy Awards.

Strout writes about people with big hearts who often live in small towns:  A disgruntled former school teacher, Somali immigrants, a school janitor, a successful writer who returns to rural Illinois to reunite with her estranged siblings.  We meet these and many, many more complicated and brilliant and flawed and eloquent characters who are powerfully and compellingly portrayed by a writer whose tremendous gifts of observation and explication are imbued with great magnanimity and compassion.

Elizabeth Strout was a guest speaker at Goucher College hours after our show and again later the same evening.  For more information, click here or contact the Kratz Center for Creative Writing  at kratz@goucher.edu

Maryland Humanities

*This program originally aired on September 21, 2017.  

Nigerian author and essayist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie joins Tom for the hour. Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus is this year's One Maryland One Book selection. Sponsored by Maryland Humanities, students and literature lovers across the state are reading and discussing the book.

Chimamanda is the author of two other novels: Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah, which is being made into a film. She published a short story collection in 2009 called The Thing Around Your Neck, and her 2012 TED Talk  was published as a book, called We Should All be Feminists.  Her latest book is Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in 15 Suggestions.

Because music transcends language barriers and evokes emotion, it’s the tool one of this year’s ‘Open Society Institute Baltimore’ fellows intends has singled out: Amy Tenney plans to harness music’s therapeutic potential with her project, ‘Healing and Community Integration through Music for Refugees and Immigrants.’

Think again if you’ve been assuming curiosity is constant, like gravity. We talk to astrophysicist Mario Livio about his book, "Why: What Makes us Curious". Not only are some people more curious than others, and curious about different questions, but homo sapiens’ capacity for curiosity grew as its brain evolved. For all its variations, Livio deems curiosity an unstoppable drive. Original air date: July 11, 2017.

matryosha/flickr

Tony and Chef Cindy run through some last minute tricks and tips to make sure the holiday goes smoothly. And Chef provides some simple recipes that are fun for the whole family.

On this Friday before Christmas 2017, a spritely and indefatigable 95-year-old raconteur joins Tom in Studio AHis name is Gilbert Sandler, and as WYPR listeners well know, Gil has been telling his Baltimore Stories on this station for the past 15 years.  On this particular Friday afternoon, as he prepares to retire the series next Friday, the story he tells is the story behind this popular and enduring narrative.

Gil and Tom are joined by Fred Rasmussen of the Baltimore Sun, a longtime friend and associate who provides a retrospective on the many quirky and fascinating characters Gil has introduced us to over the years.

photo by Rob Sivak/WYPR

To finish up our week on this Friday before Christmas, we turn to a choir that has recently been formed at Paul’s Place, a service organization in the Washington Village/Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.  Paul’s Place has provided services for the people in that neighborhood for more than 30 years, including hot lunches, clothes, health care, and programs for children. Several members of the Voices Rise Choir  -- Marvin, aka "Wolfman;" Luther; Deborah Travers; Chris Nephew; Wanda Lewis; Marc; Deborah and Ser Floyd -- have been kind enough to come to our studio today and sing us a few Christmas carols.  They're accompanied in the studio by guitarist Dr. Jeremy Lyons.

The directors of the Voices Rise Choir are two brothers who are graduates of the Peabody Institute, Douglas Benjamin and his brother, Benjamin Buchanan.  

Creative Commons/Wikimedia

Nonprofits typically benefit from a flood of holiday donations … in dollars, gifts or time. We meet two women who take a more do-it-yourself approach to giving … by creating their own events to benefit those in need in Baltimore. Shannon Dixon will host her first  “Cookies and Hot Cocoa for the Homeless” event that will take place Sunday, on Christmas Eve from 6pm to 9pm. And Mary England is preparing for her second annual “Scarf Abandonment Project.” She talks about why promoting kindness is a worthy cause all year round.

Here's a Stoop Story from Taya Dunn Johnson about how being a rebellious fourth grader directly affected her Christmas that year -- a lesson that has stayed with her always. You can hear her story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

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