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At the far southern end of the Chesapeake Bay, Jonathan White, a former rear admiral in the U.S. Navy, was helping to lead a tour of the world’s largest naval base, Naval Station Norfolk. While some dismiss climate change as a hoax, Admiral White described the very real threat that sea-level rise caused by global warming poses even to the military.

 “If we just did nothing with this base, it’s easy to see that in a worst-case scenario of a couple of meters of sea level rise by the end of the century, much of this base would not be usable,” said White, an oceanographer and former director of the Navy’s Task Force on Climate Change. “You wouldn’t even be able to get to the ships to even pull the ships in to the piers here. So you are going to have to do something to respond to that level of sea level rise.”

Chase Carter

As many as 15 women have come forward to accuse presidential candidate Donald Trump of sexual assault or harassment. The allegations began to roll in after a 2005 Access Hollywood video surfaced earlier this month. In the video Trump is heard bragging to  former NBC anchor Billy Bush about sexually assaulting women. Trump denied the sexual assault allegations -- by insulting several of his accusers -- and also dismissed the language heard on the video as "locker room talk."

Many have pointed out that his so-called locker room talk is indicative of a larger societal problem; rape culture.  

Maryland’s jails hold hundreds of people who judges say could be released on bail, but the defendants haven’t come up with the cash to pay the 10% bail fee. This month Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh issued an opinion that it’s probably unconstitutional to hold defendants in jail because they can’t afford to pay.  Frosh says the system upends the lives of many charged with minor crimes -- and doesn’t make Maryland’s citizens safer.

And we talk to a bail bondsman who agrees bail should be set so people can pay, but thinks most people awaiting trial in jail should be behind bars.

Read the opinion from Attorney General Brian Frosh.

Time for the second installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series! Andrew Stephenson didn’t always want to be a lawyer. Growing up in Dublin, Ireland, Andrew learned a lot in the kitchen from his mother and dreamed of owning his own restaurant. After high school, he began working in kitchens. Eventually Andrew moved to London to start law school, but continued cooking, taking a job at a restaurant in a posh neighborhood called Primrose Hill. His story has been edited for brevity. 

Josh Koonce/Flickr via Creative Commons

Baltimore’s mayor is asking the state to chip in $30 million for police reforms she expects to be mandated by a consent decree with the U.S. Justice Department. That court-enforceable decree is still being worked out, but our guest tells us these changes are costly because cities like Baltimore have put off reforms for decades. Years of neglect mean that the remedies - such as a warning system to spot troublesome behavior by officers - will be expensive. Criminal justice expert Samuel Walker is Professor Emeritus of Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska. He has written more than a dozen books on policing and criminal justice, and has advised police departments across the country. 

John Shields/Kenneth Lam, Baltimore Sun

Resident foodies John Shields, owner of Gertrude's and Sascha Wolhandler, owner of  Sascha’s 527 Restaurant & Catering  join Tom for our regular segment Whatcha Got Cookin'.

It's the season for root vegetables, dark leafy greens, pumpkins and squashes. John and Sascha share ways to turn up your turnips and take the bland out of Brussel sprouts. 

Football season is underway and that means tailgating. We'll talk about ways to turn your chicken wings and chili menu into a gourmet feast.

Johns Hopkins University

Today, we consider some important issues in the field of bioethics.

Tom welcomes Dr. Jeffrey Kahn to Studio A.  Dr. Kahn is the director of the Berman Center of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University.  Folks in his field think about things like the ethical ramifications of research, how doctors interact with patients, public health policy, and global approaches to things like food distribution and allocation of medicine.  Different approaches have different outcomes, and bioethicists think about those outcomes through the prism of the moral dimension of those choices.

We thought we’d start by talking about the public health issue that has dominated the headlines since this summer.  The Zika virus grabbed the public health spotlight and spread like crazy in certain parts of the world, including an outbreak that has been controlled in the Miami area. One of the approaches to eliminating the virus that scientists are considering involves genetically modifying mosquitoes and then releasing them into the environment. On the surface, it may seem that changing the genetic make-up of some insects shouldn’t be cause for alarm. But like so many of the issues that Jeff Kahn and his colleagues consider, it’s not that simple.

Dr. Kahn also weighs in on the topic of babies now being born with more than two biological parents. They actually carry the genetic material of three parents. To the parents who otherwise might not have biological children, the technology that makes this possible is a blessing. But is it a good idea? What are the consequences of these new possibilities? Tom asks Dr. Kahn about framing the questions we should be asking in bioethics, to find the answers we need.

Photo by Joan Marcus

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is a play adapted from the 2003 mystery novel by British writer Mark Haddon. The novel is told from a first-person perspective by Christopher John Francis Boone, a 15-year-old boy living in suburban England who describes himself as "a mathematician with some behavioral difficulties."

Christopher's condition is never identified, but he appears to fit the profile of someone living on the autism spectrum, with a condition once referred to as Asperger's syndrome.  Haddon has blogged that he is not an expert on autism, and that "Curious Incident is not a book about Asperger's....if anything, it's a novel about difference, about being an outsider, about seeing the world in a surprising and revealing way."

We discuss a new novel about bootleggers, mobsters and baseball players -- specifically, the greatest player of all time, Babe Ruth, born and raised in Baltimore. The book is "The Babe Ruth Deception," and it’s the third book of fiction by historian David O. Stewart. His nonfiction works include books about James Madison, Aaron Burr, and the Constitutional Convention. David O. Stewart joins us to discuss the book.